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Author Topic: Tomb Of The Unknown Warrior - Kent connection  (Read 2895 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Tomb Of The Unknown Warrior - Kent connection
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2017, 22:09:54 »
Link to British Pathé footage of the return of the Unknown Warrior: November 1920.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=ug90S6wnWV0 9.48 mins.
The clip starts with the coffin being taken by eight British and Dominion NCOs from the Chapelle Ardente at Boulogne Castle. The coffin is loaded onto a military wagon and escorted to the harbour by French troops. Once at the harbour the coffin is loaded on board HMS Verdun.
As the flotilla comes into Dover harbour it receives a Field Marshals salute of nineteen guns. HMS Verdun docks at Dover's Admiralty Pier at 15.30pm, Wednesday 10 November 1920. From here the coffin is escorted to Dover Marine Station.
The film then jumps to 11 November and we see the coffin, draped with the Union Flag, on a gun carriage at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London.
This link contains more shots of the coffin arriving at Dover, 1.27 to 2.16. http://youtube.com/watch?v=C9O0U-g2VSk.

Having arrived at London's Victoria Station, the coffin was placed on a gun carriage and covered with the 'Padre's Flag'. The cortege then moved to the Cenotaph where it remained while the Cenotaph was unveiled by King George V. The cortege then moved on to Westminster Abbey where the coffin was carried into the West Nave flanked by one hundred recipients of the Victoria Cross.
The service was conducted by Bishop Ryle. King George scattered some French earth on the coffin as it was lowered into the grave by troops of the 3rd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. The Reveille and the Last Post were sounded and the open grave was covered by the 'Actors Pall' and the 'Padre's Flag'. Four servicemen, representing the Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force, kept watch with reversed rifles while the first of around one million mourners filed past.
A week later the grave was closed. Silver sand surrounded the coffin on top of which was placed soil from the Ypres Salient.
The gravestone of black Belgian marble was placed on the grave a year later.

See also Train of the Unknown Warrior @ http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=18866

Photos from the collection of the Imperial War Museums.
More can be seen @ =mediaType%3Aimage]http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?query=%20unknown%20warrior&items_per_page=50&f([0]=mediaType%3Aimage

© IWM (Q 68248) HMS Verdun carrying the body of the Unknown Warrior to Dover at Boulogne.

© IWM (Q 31492) A view of the coffin of the Unknown Soldier in Westminster Abbey, November 1920, showing the inscription on the beaten iron plate.

Offline Jason

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Re: Tomb Of The Unknown Warrior - Kent connection
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2010, 22:35:13 »
Yes, from their web site:

"Photography and filming (pictures and/or sound) of any kind is not allowed in any part of the Abbey at any time"

Nice!  I remember going to Wells Cathedral, and they charged a couple of pounds for a photography permit.  That strikes me as a better idea, but to charge that much and forbid photography strikes me as a bit much.  At least Canterbury and Rochester are alright with photography.

As for the SLR - might be best to leave that until the end of the visit, just in case ;)

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Tomb Of The Unknown Warrior - Kent connection
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2010, 19:19:09 »
Interesting - never knew about the sword!

I found the price of admission looking at something else - makes Canterbury Cathedral cheep at half the price!

I guessed photography was out as all their links on their website to tombs include the option 'buy postcard'!

SLR on high ISO is always handy tho ;-)

Offline Jason

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Re: Tomb Of The Unknown Warrior - Kent connection
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2010, 22:31:01 »
Did you know -

The vicar of St John's Church Margate, David Railton was an ex military chaplain and on his arrival in 1920 became a the instigator for a national monument. Upon the creation of the tomb in Westminster Abbey a Union Flag was obtained to overlook it and this was obtained from St John's being the one Railton used for the covering of the military coffins laid to rest there.


Info from Bygone Kent Vol6 No9.

The coffin was brought from France to Dover Marine station, and then along the North Kent line via Gillingham and Chatham to London Victoria.  There's a commemorative plaque at platform 8, where the train arrived, which was unveiled a few years ago by one of the original pall bearers.

The coffin is made of English oak, and has a crusader's sword from the Tower of London collection attached to the outside.  The brass inlaid letters of the inscription on the tombstone were made from ammunition casings retrieved from the battlefields.

The congregation at Westminster Abbey included mothers who had lost more than one family member in the war, and over 100 holders of the Victoria Cross.

I'd recommend this book to anyone:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Soldier-Neil-Hanson/dp/0552149764/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262555379&sr=8-1

If you want to go into Westminster Abbey to see the tomb of the unknown warrior, and possibly pay your respects, you now have to pay 15 pounds admission.  If you'd like to take a photograph of the tomb of the only man who died in the First World War whose body was repatriated to the UK, you can't.

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Tomb Of The Unknown Warrior - Kent connection
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2009, 19:28:55 »
Did you know -

The vicar of St John's Church Margate, David Railton was an ex military chaplain and on his arrival in 1920 became a the instigator for a national monument. Upon the creation of the tomb in Westminster Abbey a Union Flag was obtained to overlook it and this was obtained from St John's being the one Railton used for the covering of the military coffins laid to rest there.


Info from Bygone Kent Vol6 No9.

 

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