News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Faversham Gunpowder Works  (Read 7250 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline davpott

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
  • Appreciation 46
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2015, 21:59:29 »
I couldn't find my book but I did find this on the tinternet.

"Abandoned jetty of Dans dock near Uplees in Kent, named after Sampson Dan who owned a brickworks nearby and used it for transporting bricks from, but it was later used by the Cotton Powder Company for the loading of gunpowder, cordite and TNT from the site onto ships. Not far from here on 2nd April 1916 a huge explosion occurred as munitions ignited and killed over 100 workers. The works were abandoned in 1919 with the end of WW1 and closed for good."

source http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-abandoned-jetty-of-dans-dock-near-uplees-in-kent-once-used-for-the-32084616.html

Offline davpott

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
  • Appreciation 46
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2015, 13:19:14 »
I seem to recall reading that Dan's dock was originally constructed for shipping bricks from a nearby brickworks. I'll try and find my booklet on the Harty ferry gunpowder works this evening.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 994
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2015, 19:41:15 »
An aerial view of the wharf from google earth 1960

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline mikeb

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 522
  • Appreciation 27
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2015, 13:44:25 »
I didn't know about Bretts S4, but yes that could be the answer to the two parallel tracks.

Having checked properly you're absolutely right S4, the DLR was to a gauge of 3ft 3ins, which is as near as dammit  1mtr. 

Offline Sentinel S4

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1932
  • Appreciation 165
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2015, 12:18:26 »
The Davington line was Meter gauge, I believe. Bretts Quarries worked this are after the gunpowder works had gone, they used a narrower gauge (around the 2'/2'6" mark). Did they send gravel by sea?

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline mikeb

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 522
  • Appreciation 27
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2015, 12:07:22 »
Apologies, these two were left of my post.

Offline mikeb

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 522
  • Appreciation 27
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2015, 12:05:11 »
Yesterday (11th July) I took a walk along the "sea wall" from Harty Ferry to Conyer Creek. I thought the following photo's of the former powder works etc located on the shoreline may be of interest.
1) Dans Dock. The wooden structures appear to be the remains of a wooden dock, but they are for the most part inside, and below, a retaining concrete wall. Was this dock part of the Gun Powder Mills complex? The dock actually breaches the line of the sea wall.  Who was Dan?
2) A substantial concrete foundation the seaward side of the sea wall. Was this part of the Gas works?
3) Adjacent to this foundation,  parallel railway tracks leading down to the remains of a pier. The sleepers are concreted in, but the position of the rail fixings can be seen suggesting a gauge of 2ft. / 2ft. 6ins. ( I didn't have a stick of inches on me!). Certainly narrower than the Davington Railway of 3ft. I would have thought.
4) The remains of what would have been a substantial wharf, perhaps for exporting explosives by barge?
5) A mooring ring set in the wall opposite this wharf. I found several similar bases, but only this one ring.
6) Steps leading down to the mud from the sea wall to, what?
No doubt the whole area was kept dredged when in use and the current mud levels may well be hiding more "treasures". It surprised me how much can still be seen after being abandoned nearly 100 years ago.


amundsen1912

  • Guest
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2013, 02:56:54 »

''The main ingredient of gunpowder is saltpetre, which was imported from India by the Company and then either sold to the government or re-exported. There were numerous gunpowder mills in the Faversham and Dartford areas whose owners grew very rich. We know nothing about the Kent merchants who might have supplied these goods for export. However, we do have information on at least one director of the East India Company from 1758 to1774, who had a business in Kent, Frederick Pigou, a Huguenot. Pigou and his nephew Peter Andrews were in partnership with the Gruebers in the Oare gunpowder works 1768-1798. Pigou also owned gunpowder 'manufacturies' and stores in Dartford and the Erith Marshes''.
http://www.hereshistorykent.org.uk/displaytheme.cfm?pagetype=Themes&themeID=110&category=Black




Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2012, 17:14:19 »
16th May 1925

Explosion at Powder Factory.
Three Men Killed.

Shortly after 2 o’clock to-day, an explosion occurred in one of the press houses at the Marsh Explosive Works at Oare, near Faversham, owned by Messrs. Curtis’s and Harvey, Limited.  This was immediately followed by an explosion in another press house.  Three men were at work in the first press house at the time, and all were killed instantaneously.  Two of the bodies have been recovered, but it is believed that the other man was blown to pieces.
It is at the press houses that the most dangerous work is done in the finishing off of the cordite and gun-cotton, and extreme care is always taken there by the employees.  Fortunately no one else was injured at the works.  The tops of some of the surrounding trees were blown off, and in the branches of one of them was seen a sleeve of a man’s coat.  The shock of the explosion was violently felt in Sittingbourne.  Houses shook and every door and window rattled.  The noise was heard at least as far as Gillingham, 16 miles away.
Large portions of the debris, many pounds in weight, were blown over a bank of trees, some between 70ft. and 80ft. high, into an adjoining field.   The body of Clarke was blown over the trees into a mangel-wurzel field among pieces of machinery and woodwork, and was subsequently found by a ploughman, who was at work planting seeds, while Head’s body was discovered in the canal which runs close to the factory.
The following statement was made at the London office of Messrs. Curtis’s and Harvey:-

“At 2.10 pm. to-day, one of the press houses in the Marsh Works of the Faversham factory of Messrs. Curtis’s and Harvey exploded, and immediately caused a second press house to explode.  Both buildings were entirely demolished.  Three of the workmen in the first press house were killed instantaneously, but no other injuries were reported.  Considerable damage was done to the other buildings by the concussion.  The names od the men who were killed were T. Stevens and J. Head, press house hands, and H. Clarke, a boatman.  The cause of the explosion is not known, and a Home Office inquiry will be held.”

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2012, 21:37:38 »
10th November 1864

The Fatal Explosion at Faversham.

The inquest on the bodies of George Sherwood, 64, labourer, and Henry Keene, 28, labourer, who were killed by the explosion at Messrs. Hall’s powder works, near this town (Faversham), on Monday afternoon, took place to-day, before Mr. T.T. Delasaux, coroner for East Kent.  It was stated during the proceedings that it was 26 years yesterday since the last fatal casualty accured in connexion with these works.
Mr. James Tassell attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of Mr. Hall and Sons.  The friends of the deceased were not represented.
The jury, having been sworn, proceeded to view the bodies, which were lying in a portion of the works near where the explosion occurred.  On their return the following evidence was adduced:-
Christopher Johncock, labourer, employed by Messrs. Hall at the powder-works, Davington, deposed, - On Monday I was working at the powder boats from half-past 6 in the morning until between 3 and 4 in the afternoon.  I was removing powder from the presshouse to the corning house, and thence to the glazinghouse.  The dust which came from the powder I took back to the chargehouse in order that it might be returned to the mill.  At half-past 3 o’clock I was waiting in the boat shed for more powder, when I heard a report proceeding from the corninghouse.  I knew that at that time Henry Keene and John Sherwood were at work there.  I had been in the corninghouse about half an hour before, and at that time Sherwood was standing on the platform and Keene was sweeping up the dust with a hair broom.  That is the usual mode adopted.  On hearing the explosion I put on my slippers and went towards the corninghouse.  I saw the boards and materials with which the corninghouse was built scattered on fire in all directions, but could not see anything of the deceased.  I assisted in extinguishing the fire and then returned to the boat.  I put the powder from the boat into the chargehouse and left.  I cannot say anything as to the cause of the explosion.
By a juror. – When I was in the corninghouse the machinery was not going.
Examination continued. – It is the practice when the men are at work in the corning-house for the gte leading thereto to be locked to prevent strangers from going there.  Before the explosion, and yesterday I found the gate locked and took the key out.  About a quarter past 3 o’clock on Monday afternoon I saw both the deceased and spoke to Henry Keene.  I asked if he had any more powder for me, and he said “No.”  The dress of the men employed in the “powder houses” is similar to that I now have on, and every precaution is taken to prevent an accident.
By the jury. – After the powder is taken out of the corninghouse the men have nothing to do but to sweep up the dust and oil the machinery for the following day.  The deceased had slippers on when I saw him last.  When the dust is swept up it is put into bags and taken back to the mills.  Slippers are worn by all the men in the powder houses and the boats.  The floors of the corninghouse are of boards, covered entirely with leather, called “powder hides,” and fastened down with copper tacks.
James Burney, foreman of the carpenters employed at Messrs. Hall’s powder-works, deposed, - I have been in Messrs. Hall’s service for over 38 years.  It is 26 years since any accident resulting in loss of life occurred in connexion with these works.  On Monday afternoon, about half-past 3 o’clock, I was in the carpenter’s shop at work when I heard an explosion.  Seeing it was at the corninghouse, I went there directly, and, after obtaining assistance, searched for the bodies of the deceased, whiom I knew were employed there.  In a few minutes we found the body of John Sherwood, and shortly afterwards that of Henry Keene, who were both dead.  Keene had been employed on the works about five or six years, and Sherwood upwards of 30 years.  It is quite impossible to tell the cause of the explosion.  Every possible precaution is taken to prevent accidents.
Thomas Johnson, who lives on the powder works at Oare as foreman deposed, - I was at the place here the deceased were employed between 11 and 12 o’clock on Monday.  I spoke to Sherwood.  The men were at their usual work, and everything was gins on as usual.  I have been employed at the works 35 years.  I cannot tell the cause of the explosion, not can I suggest anything as to the probable cause.  Everything we can think of is done to prevent accidents.  It is about 26 years since any person was killed at Messrs. Hall’s powder-works. (In reply to Mr. Hall this witness said that his father was killed at the works 41 years ago).  Thirty years ago accidents occurred more frequently than at present.  Prior to that time there was one in five or six years on the average.
By a juror. – I should say that when the accident happened the men had about finished work for the day.  The men were not working up “chugs” at the time of the accident, as the machinery was perfectly still.
The Coroner having briefly summed up, the jury, without retiring, returned a verdict of “Accidental Death,” coupling with it an expression of their opinion that “every possible precaution is taken in connexion with Messrs. Hall’s gunpowder works to prevent accidents.”
This afternoon Colonel Boxer attended at the works on behalf of the Government to institute an examination into the probable cause of the explosion.

martinrogers

  • Guest
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2012, 12:20:23 »

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2012, 12:03:44 »
Estimate for rebuilding the Storekeepers House at Faversham according to the Annexed Plan and Profile 1762.

Bricklayer£ud£ud
40 Rods of Reduced Brickwork at £7:10 p rod30000
18 Square of Plain Tyling ript at u20 p Sqr.1800
93 Yards of Brick on Edge Paving the Cellar at u2:6 p Yd.11126
332 Yards of Lath & Plaister Cieling at 2d p Yard1620
123 Yards of Redering the Walls at 6d p Yard 316
443 feet supply of plain Cornice at 10d p foot1892
36752
Carpenter£ud£ud
18 Squares 31 feet of Single Roofing at 30u p Sq.2733
33 squares 50 feet of Firr Naked flooring at 50u p Sq.83150
4 Squares of Ashlering in Garrets at 10u p Sq.200
27 Squares of whole deal Boarding of Floor at 35 p Sq.47150
108 Yards of Square Deal Wainscott Low at 3u p Yard.1640
253 Yards of Battening & Papering the Walls at 2u p yard.2560
510 feet of whole deal Gutters & Bearers at 9d p foot.1926
450 ft. supply of Square Deal Shutters & Windows Lining at 9d p ft.1676
481 ft. supply of Sashes, Frames and Glass at 3u p foot.7330
200 ft. supply of ½ Deal Doors in 6 pannels at 10d p foot.868
50 ft. supply of outside Door at 6d p foot.2100
250 ft. supply of Rebated Linings at 6d p foot650
250 ft. running of Whole Deal Skirting at 4d p foot.434
500 ft. running of Single Architrave at 4 d p foot.863
58 steps of Stair case, including Rails, Newells, Brackets & Ballisters at 5u each.14100
120 ft. Supply in Garret Doors at 8d p foot.400
72 ft. supply of Rebated Lining at 6d p foot.1160
370 ft. Supply of Bracketting at 4d.634
To frontice pieces of Doors500
371610
Mason£ud£ud
To six Portland Chimney Pieces1800
To 13 Portland Steps in Front of Doors at 20u each.1300
4 Plinth Stones to Door Bases at 5u each.100
52 feet running of Purbeck Steps at 18d p foot.3180
13 Window Cills at 10u each.6100
150 ft Supply of Portland Coping at 10 d p foot.650
70750
Plumber£ud£ud
77? Of new Sheet Lead in Gutters, Hips, Ridges and Dormer windows, Work included at 20u p ?7700
To 4 Rain Water Cisterns at 30u each.600
31 yards of 4 Inch rain water Pipe at 6u p yard.960
9260
Painter£ud£ud
450 yards if 3a Painting in Oil at 6d o yard.1150
19 Sash Frames 3a Ditto in Oil0190
15 Dozens of Square Ditto at 12d p  Dozen0150
12190
To Ironmonger & Smiths Work 4000
It is Computed that the Materials of the Old House will Defray the pulling of it down, Removing Rubbish, Digging the Foundation & Levelling &c.
Total 932100

Estimated by J. C. Desmaretz

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2012, 18:24:51 »
An Estimate
Of Repairs proposed to be done at the
Royal Powder Mills at
Faversham
1762

£ud
222 yards supply of pointing the garden wall – at 18 p yard.16130
1 Rod of Brickwork in terrass, to a wall across the pond and drain1600
1 rod of ditto – in mortar7100
Carting and wheeling 234 yards solid of earth to fill between the said wall – at 22 d p yard2190
postponed400 yards running of wharfing the ponds in the garden – at 7.6d p yard15000
27 ½ rods 5 feet of oak paleing to part the new mills & stable at 26.8d p yard/36134
35 rods 4 feet of oak paleing to fence the parsons meadow near the road at 17u p rod29150
62 rods of paleing to fence the land purchased of Mrs. Colegate at 28.6d p rod8870
12 rods of ditto – to fence the land hired of Mr. Ovender at 28.6d p rod1720
Extra work in spurs, whickett, gates, and barr gates900
Iron work with locks and hinges to the said paleing600
140ft running of oak posts and firr rails to inclose the new stables at1u p yard700
To repair the wharfing where the powder is shipt on board10100
Carpenters work to finish the two horse mills29121
Smiths work to ditto1200
Labourers work in assisting the smiths to turn the iron runners and making a chalk floor in the new mills10000
To seavelwork & gravel, in repair to the mill roads & causeway5000
To erect a shed for a cart lodge and straw house at the back of the new stable6000
500 yards of painting 3, in oil, at the new stable, watch & charge house, palisades, gates and rails12100
For repairing the brewhouse of fitting up a corn chamber with binns &c.49170
To build a boghouse for the millmen & stablekeeper400
To repair and lengthen the bridge across the road by Ospringe mill1000
1.00585

Estimated by J. C. Desmaretz

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2012, 18:31:03 »
Abstract of the Estimate of Repairs at the Royal Powder Mills at Faversham 1762.

Estimated atPostponedAllowed
Repairs at the Royal Powder Mills.£1,005  8  5£150  0  0£ 855  8  5
Rebuilding the Storekeepers house.£ 932  10 0 £ 932  10 0

27 May 1762
Approved & Order’d


Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2012, 17:30:48 »

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines