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Author Topic: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham  (Read 16065 times)

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Offline John E Vigar

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2011, 17:18:40 »
Yes, the plaster was taken off at lower levels to help the walls breathe. in the process, as you say, previously covered features were found. The church suffers badly from damp and whilst it would be nice to replace the plaster there are no current plans to do so.

hypochlorite

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2011, 15:56:04 »
This is one of our special places.

I wonder if the plaster has been hacked away due to damp.

There seems to be various features underneath.

SeanT

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2010, 20:13:34 »
Thanks Riding with the Angels. It sounds promising.

SeanT

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2010, 22:27:14 »
I can't be certain but there are extenaive 20th C graves at the old church so I think all burials were and still are taking place at the old church.

SeanT

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2010, 22:00:31 »
Hi Longpockets.

Thanks again. I'll check it out.

SeanT

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2010, 15:27:58 »
SeanT,

I would be careful with this, with you giving the date 1916, I know there are CWGC burials in the old churchyard, a cemetery search at http://www.cwgc.org/debt_of_honour.asp?menuid=14 against Burham returns 4 burials in the Old church yard, one from 1919 and the others from WW2. Therefore I assume from this it was still in use after the new church was built. Your burial may well be at the Old Church.

Regards

Longpockets

SeanT

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2010, 22:26:50 »
Thanks Longpockets, and also to kyn. I've been looking into a burial in 1916 and was trying to determine whether the old or the new St Mary's was the likely candidate. The parish records don't specify, but as the church in its entirety seems to have moved up the hill, I think you've answered my question. I just wonder now if the authorities have a list of the graves they would have surely had to re-inhume...

SeanT

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2010, 16:50:23 »
Hi Sean T

"St Mary's Burham - the new church (now demolished) - does anyone know if burials took place there in Church Street after the congregation moved up the hill?"

I friend of mine, who has lived in the area all his life (60 years), mentioned to me he wouldn't fancy living in the newer houses by the war memorial, which was the site of the New Church, as they were built on top of the grave yard.

I hope this helps.

Regards

Longpockets

Offline kyn

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2010, 21:38:04 »
Welcome along SeanT, what interesting questions!  I look forward to hearing the answers if they are found  :)

SeanT

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2010, 21:33:34 »
Hi all.

A couple of questions, if I may.

St Mary's Burham - the new church (now demolished) - does anyone know if burials took place there in Church Street after the congregation moved up the hill?

Roman temples / shrines: the remains of a roman temple are (or were) located near to Warren Road, Blue Bell Hill - which must be perilously close to the edge of the former quarry cutting cliffs now. Does anyone know to which god(s) this may have been dedicated?

Many thanks.

Sean T

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2010, 22:27:07 »
Did do - as always when I can find one - there were about 10-12 in front of me today tho - busy busy.

merc

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2010, 22:23:10 »
Great additions...thanks Riding :)

Did you sign the visitors book ?

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2010, 22:10:27 »
Some from today with a bit more daylight












Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2009, 19:15:09 »
Clever trick stealing a church bell!!

merc

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Re: Church of St. Mary the virgin, Burham
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2009, 18:25:17 »
Burham takes its name from its proximity to "Burgh" or "Borough" - of Rochester. In Mediaeval times pilgrims from London to Canterbury may have crossed the River Medway at Rochester bridge, or if they travelled the ancient route now known as the "Pilgrims Way" they may have crossed via ferry at Halling-Wouldham or Snodland-Burham. Pilgrims and travellers might have stopped in the Churches at these places, sometimes to wait for adequate tides on the river for ferry crossings.

The main body of the church dates from the 11th century, but the chancel was rebuilt or altered in the 14th century. Build
ing materials found in the church include flint, ragstone, chalk, tufa, reused Roman brick and firestone from Reigate (Surrey). The porch is from the 15th century, and the step down into the church shows how the churchyard has risen on the South side where huge drains were built to keep the dampness at bay.

Early in the 13th century, Aisles were built on the North and South sides of the church. Its twin church, across the river at Snodland was also enlarged at this time, however, the aisles at St Mary's were demolished about 200 years later, the reason's unknown, possibly due to the wet ground making them unstable. Sometimes in Winter, standing water is found on the floor in the church which is very close to the level of the River Medway a few yards away.

The tower dates from about 1450 and originally had three bells, the two 18th century bells now hang in other Kent churches, but the other bell, which was from the early 14th century, was sadly stolen in 1982.

 

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