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Author Topic: Home Life in WW2  (Read 136588 times)

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Offline peterchall

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #105 on: August 16, 2010, 17:31:36 »
The Me109s and He111s often shown in today's newsreels as BoB shots, are actually from the film 'Battle of Britain' and were hired from the Spanish Air Force. The irony is that thay were fitted with Merlin engines!!
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #104 on: August 15, 2010, 23:46:06 »
The best Merlin roar was from the Mustang on its low level high speed blast along the length of the Runway - very impressive!

(and what a great sound it is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2nlGN6aS8g)
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Offline afsrochester

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #103 on: August 15, 2010, 23:06:18 »
I?ve just realised that today is the 70th anniversary of the first ?big? event that I remember of the Battle of Britain.

We were lucky enough to have 2 visits from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight at the Combined Ops weekend at Headcorn. What a magnificent sound the Rolls Royce Merlin engine produces! Makes the hairs on my neck stand on end everytime I hear it.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #102 on: August 15, 2010, 22:46:48 »
I've just realised that today is the 70th anniversary of the first 'big' event that I remember of the Battle of Britain.

About 4pm the sirens went followed by the sound of aircraft. Nothing unusual in that because up to that time any planes were usually just passing over, and my mother and I went into the garden. A formation of planes was approaching from the south and there was the sudden crash of bombs and guns; we dashed indoors and down the cellar. It turned out to be the attack on the Short's factory at Rochester Airport, when the Stirling bomber production line was destroyed. The book 'Front Line County' says there were 18 Dorniers but, from the awesome noise, I thought it was the whole Luftwaffe.

It was the day that Fred's uncle scared the wits out of me, Fred being a German whose uncle was on the raid. See:
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=4665.msg41737#msg41737 Reply#9

We heard that some stray bombs had dropped on Delce Road, Rochester, and Mum and I went to see a friend of hers who lived there. It was the first bomb damage I had seen, although only some broken windows and slates off. If anyone saw the program 'Heroes of Biggin Hill' on the 'Yesterday' channel the other night, they may remember mention of how German raids were clearly divided into morning and afternoon events, with an apparent knocking off at lunch and tea time, and this is an aspect that I remember. However, on this day the Luftwaffe did some overtime and came back in the early evening, while we were with mum's friend. Although nothing happened I remember it as an example of people inviting passers-by into their shelters, but I think we became a bit more blase as time went on.
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Offline Robin

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #101 on: August 15, 2010, 21:38:55 »
Seeing the photograph from Aspidestra of the shrapnel reminded me of of my father who was a policeman during the war, he used to bring bomb fragments home when he had been on duty during a raid, I remember that the edges of these pieces of shrapnel were like razor blades.  My mother used to wrap the pieces in newspaper, and I was forbidden to touch them in case I cut myself.  I often wondered what happened to them, and I shudder to think what it would have been like to have been hit by a fragment.

Robin. 
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Offline Robin

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #100 on: August 15, 2010, 21:18:53 »
During the war, we had a local butcher come round with a mobile shop, one of the items that I remember my mother buying from him occasionaly was a rabbit, this was a delicasy.  Not having eaten rabbit since the war, I was at the County Show recently, and on one of the stands selling Kentish produce was a rabbit cut into portions, so I got one and made a casserole, I am no Jamie Oliver, but it was excellent.

Robin.   
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #99 on: August 15, 2010, 20:30:15 »
I did a bit of surfing but couldn't find any reference to mock banana in WW2, but there is a modern mock banana pie made with real bananas. I found mention of a recipe (but not the recipe itself) for 'squirrel tail pie' - the mind boggles!!!

I also found this website that I think is interesting: http://www.ukhomefront.co.uk/6.html
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #98 on: August 15, 2010, 15:38:14 »
The lack of bananas, oranges, etc. during WW2 brought back memories of my mother making `mock banana`. Parsnips were boiled until soft and then mashed with banana essence and sugar added. A sandwich was then made with one slice of bread and margerine spread with the mock banana and the other with Marmite. At Sunday School parties these sandwiches were the kids favourite. Most people find this concoction revolting but I still have the occasional banana and Marmite sandwich today. I often wonder where this recipe originated or whether it was Mum`s own.

Offline Paul

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #97 on: June 01, 2010, 20:27:03 »
It was very rusty but on emerying the large end face some numbers showed up. As far as I can make out they are   14 II AP4   3G, and on the opposite side   264

It looks possible :) fuel injector nozzle, Kraftstoff Duse = Fuel Nozzle



Theres a pic here  http://www.zenza.se/vw/vw%20bilder/vw0014bb.jpg
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Maid of Kent

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #96 on: June 01, 2010, 16:07:59 »
As it is raining this afternoon I have been able to sit and read, fairly carefully all that has been writen in this topic so far and to say it has jogged some memories and confirmed others.

Yes, Peter you are quite right I do remember the war. Although I was only 3 years and 6months old 'the day war broke out' so many memories seem to be seared into my brain, but where do I begin for this topic. The beginning, I suppose. But you must all remember that 'My War' is seen through the eyes of a younger child.

A little back ground - I was in Cumberland on holiday when war was declared, came south to Whitstable at Chris
tmas, and then to  Lower Rainham in time for the Battle of Britain.

How exciting! How fascinating! Sitting outside the scullery door on the mounting block (now gone) in the hot sunshine watching this marvellous aerial ballet going on over my head, planes weaving and diving and climbing, leaving contrails of white, grey and  and now and again round puffs of smoke appearing amongst it all. My own very private airshow. How long I was there, some time I imagine, when all of a sudden I was grabbed by my Aunt and hauled indoors as it was dangerous because of the shrapnell, whatever that was. I hadn't seen any! I was most miffed.
 But some small children donot have any concept of fear. I suppose it is how it portrayed. Generally I had more trouble with the Witches in Wizard of Oz and Snow White than I did with the war - though there were moments. There was one occasion when I was out in the front orchard when I heard soldiers marching along, turning up the lane so I ran to wave and HORROR!!!! They waved back, their Swastika Arm Bands showing. I nearly died of fright , running and stumbling to tell my Mother that the Germans were here. She was able to reassure me they were just pretending.I dont think I knew about differences in uniform colours. I didnt know grown-ups played war games too! I cant put a date to that incident.
 


Offline peterchall

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #95 on: May 30, 2010, 17:39:20 »
I mentioned in my opening post about standing in the garden talking to neighbours....then there was one advantage of the blackout that you don't get today - no lights! The result was the astonishing display of stars you could see. If you haven't already done it, get to some completely dark place on a clear moonless night; I think you will only gaze in wonder at the sight of the sky.
I know this is not WW2, but an article in todays 'Sunday Telegraph' rates Romney Marsh as the 5th best place in the UK for stargazing. It recommends taking a deckchair. It lists coming meteor showers as 22 June - 2 July: 28-29 July: late July - 12 August. Make sure you go on a moonless night, of course.
Speaking from my 65-70 year old memories, I can thoroughly recommend it.
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Aspidestra

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #94 on: May 20, 2010, 21:16:40 »
It was very rusty but on emerying the large end face some numbers showed up. As far as I can make out they are   14 II AP4   3G, and on the opposite side   264

Offline Paul

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #93 on: May 20, 2010, 13:42:32 »
Nice collection :)

I think the Fuel Injector would have a part number on it?
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Aspidestra

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #92 on: May 19, 2010, 22:41:51 »
 
 I thought these illustrations might help members who are not familiar with AA shrapnel.  Most of it is from  a 3.7" AA gun, the nose cone (top left) weighs about 1lb. I am not 100% certain regarding the V1 injector

Aspidestra

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Re: Home Life in WW2
« Reply #91 on: May 18, 2010, 10:59:00 »
I have just read the comments on trams in Medway, I was lucky to have ridden these trams up to the age of about five. To me they were an exciting ride especially when they got a lick on along Dock road, clattering and clanking, swaying about, before slowing down at St Mary's church on approaching the Town Hall, where we got off to visit my Grandma's in the Brook, almost next to the Stonemasons building and just before Fair Row. We always rode on top, and they were all open deck, four wheel types. The seats were of the slatted type with the back rest reversible so you could always face in the direction of travel. In wet weather there was a canvas sort of apron you could pull up to your necks and hook on to a couple of projections on the top of the back rest so protecting most of you with your face uncovered. Up there you had a grandstand view of the conductor changing the pick up round for the return journey. One time we travelled over to the Town Hall in a real pea souper of a fog, not like today's varietie's with the conductor walking in front with a flaming brand and the driver constantly clanging his bell. This time we chose to ride inside so I could watch it being driven, using the two levers controlling the rheostats and brake  living in Albany road Gillingham at the time we caught the tram at Livingstone Circus  

 

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