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Author Topic: Gunnery Experiment  (Read 4399 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Gunnery Experiment
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2011, 17:42:06 »
The Trusty was a Antna class floating battery fitted with a prototype rotating turret, mounting a single Armstrong 40-pdr BL gun, protected by sloping plates of "41/2 iron doubled round the port over timber backing."
Contrary to expectations, hits on her turret had little serious effect.
"Most of the rounds fired at the turret were from an Armstrong 100pdr but Coles pointed out that the turret was designed only to resist 40lb shot so to begin with five of these were fired with 5lb charges, with little or no effect. Thirty-four 100lb shot were fired with 12lb charges of which twenty-six hit-eight missed in calm water against a stationary target!-causing very slight physical damage, one cracked plate, and the gun was still operational. Two rounds broke in the port and would have caused numerous casualties. Finally four 68lb shot were fired with 16lb charges and the turret withstood this very severe test."
From 'Warrior to Dreadnought' by D K Brown. An excellent well illustrated volume on British warship development 1860-1905.

Offline Paul

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Re: Gunnery Experiment
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2010, 16:55:16 »
Nice one :)

I know that a "gun" is able to be "overcharged" but the stress shortens the life of the barrel.
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Gunnery Experiment
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2010, 15:05:39 »
A bit more digging on the so called 'monster gun'. During the 1850's and 1860's efforts were made in Europe and America to increase still further the size of projectiles and the velocity of projectiles in response to the introduction of armoured warships. It was found that the traditional iron guns could not withstand the massively increased forces exerted by the bigger projectiles and charges. So the race was on to perfect the new guns which due to their size were colloquially known as 'monster guns'. The Americans were the first to put a new monster gun into action, the product of the Fort Pitt Foundry in Pittsburg. However these were found to have a tendency to burst after fifty or so rounds.

In Europe the German arms manufacturer Krupp joined the race, but it was in Britain that the competition was really hot with designs submitted from Armstrong, Whitworth, Lancaster, Nasmyth, Fairbairn and Horsfall to name just some. The first successful UK forging of a monster gun was by the Mersey Iron Works in 1856 whereby a 'Horsfall Monster Gun' was produced out of wrought iron and described as being of 21tons, 17cwt, 1qr and 14lbs; 15' 10'' long with a bore of 13.05 inches and capable with a charge of 25lbs of powder of firing a projectile weighing 282lbs. In tests this gun succeeded in shattering a 4.5 inch wrought-iron armour plate. The first time such a feat had been achieved.

The various guns submitted to the British government underwent a series of tests at Shoeburyness, Sheerness and Portsmouth against so-called 'Lord Warden' and 'Warrior' targets as the test-targets were identical to the armour of those ships. It would appear that the various designs were all basically on the same track of using layered and forged wrought iron and by 1868 Macmillens Magazine was able to report on 'the largest gun at present made in the Royal Gun Factory' as a monster gun of of 13inch bore and weighing 23tons.

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Gunnery Experiment
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2010, 13:17:14 »
Yes, the 'Monster Gun' really intrigued me as well. As the United Services Magazine was written by journalists with more than a passing knowledge of the army and navy I don't think it is a journalistic 'flight of fancy'. Being 1865, maybe the monster gun was a 68pdr?

Offline Paul

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Re: Gunnery Experiment
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2010, 00:46:31 »
Are they mad?

Monster gun sounds interesting,Any more on it?
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline bromptonboy

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Gunnery Experiment
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2010, 00:14:38 »
An interesting bit from the United Services Magazine of 1865 - Vol 2. Health and Safety doesn't come into it!

THE FORTHCOMING GUNNERY EXPERIMENT AT SHEERNESS - The experiment to be tried against the floating-battery Trusty are postponed. The Trusty will be towed in on the sand within 600 yards range of the battery erected for the purpose. On the starboard of the vessel, on the after body, a large target is to be painted, so that each gun may be laid for the target. 32 pounders will be tried first, and the weight increased until the monster gun is fired.

The piece continued,..... the undermentioned officers have offered their services to remain on board her while under fire - Captain Halsted, Cdr, Lloyd, Lts. Pyne, Taylor and Phillips, al belonging to the Edinburgh screw steam guardship of the Reserve at Sheerness.

 

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