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Author Topic: St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?  (Read 15795 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2010, 15:02:59 »
 :)

Offline kyn

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2009, 19:39:51 »
I wish i could take an educated guess but i can't...

Offline Riding With The Angels

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2009, 19:24:02 »
Nice pics Kyn, what do we think the carving is?

It seems to consist of a number of eclesiastical figures of high standing (I am not versed in the subject to know the differences) along with a priest in just a habit attending a high ranking seated figure. Is it the investiture of an Archbishop perhaps? Becket?

Offline kyn

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2009, 17:38:50 »
Some pics of the remains.

Offline Riding With The Angels

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2009, 21:13:35 »
Thanks for that Worcester -

Looks from the street plan and google that the carving could still be at the east end. I am more convinced this is a reredos as opposed to a tomb. The whole wall appears to be modern although with damage to the bricks in places so I am unconvinced by the recess being anything other than modern now.

Must pay a visit

Dave

Offline Riding With The Angels

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2009, 17:12:42 »
It could explain the anomaly there. It is difficult to tell from the initial pics. I will try and make a trip down there at some point and have a look. Can you give some road names so I can find it on a map or google?

worcester

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2009, 23:27:21 »
Many thanks, lots of info. there rwta
I'd  assumed it was in it's original position and what was left when the rest of the Church was demolished, I'll get a photo so you can see the wall itself. Part of my theory on that is the soot on the carving and the brickwork.
Working from memory, I make it on the west side which doesn't seem to help.
I think the church was rebuilt in Victorian times which may explain the bricks, if I'm right may also explain the positioning at odds with the norm?

Offline Riding With The Angels

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2009, 22:13:53 »
Are there any other pics?

The ones I have seen show a carving that would appear to be a reredos or (outside bet) the side of a chest tomb. The former is more likely. Depending on the orientation of the recess is could be either an aumbrey or a piscina. Traditionally the aumbrey is usually located either on the north wall of the chancel or on the east wall on the north side of the altar. A piscina meanwhile will be near any altar usually on the south wall of the chancel near the main altar or on a nearest wall to any other aisle or chapel altar. This would also normally have a drain hole in the bottom to drain away the w
ater used. It may also be a water stoup and would have been one inside or outside of the main entrance door. Unusually this seems to have been made of brick.

It would be good to see a wider shot or a plan to see the orientation of these relics.

Dave

Offline Riding With The Angels

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St Mary Bredin, Canterbury?
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2009, 22:07:00 »
From Hasted -

ST. MARY BREDIN, usually called Little Lady Dungeon church, is situated at a small distance north westward from the Dungeon, whence it takes that name, and Watling-street. It is a very small building, seemingly antient, consisting of a nave, and small isle on the north side of it, and a chancel; at the north-west corner is a wooden pointed turret, in which hang three small bells.  You go down into it by several steps, which makes it very damp.
This church was built by William, surnamed Fithamon, being the son of Hamon, the son of Vitalis, one of those who came over from Normandy with William the
Conqueror. This William was, no doubt, the patron of this church, which he had built, and most probably gave it to the neighbouring nunnery of St. Sepulchre, where it staid till the dissolution of that house in king Henry VIII.'s reign, when the patronage of it was granted anno 29th of it, when the nunnery and the rest of the possessions of it, to the archbishop of Canterbury, subject nevertheless to the payment of 3s. to the vicar of this church; all which were again reconveyed by the archbishop to the king in his 37th year, in exchange for other premises, and he granted them the following year to the Hales's, lords of the manor of the Dungeon, whose burial place was within this church; since which the patronage of it has continued in the possession of the owners of that manor, down to Henry Lee Warner, of Walsingham abbey, in Norfolk, the present patron of it.
Upon the decline of the church of St. Edmund of Riding-gate, not far distant, of the patronage likewise of the same nunnery, it was in
 1349 united to this of St. Mary Bredin, with the consent of the prioress and convent.  
This vicarage is valued in the king's books at 4l. 1s. 5 ?d. and the yearly tenths at 8s. 1 ?d.  In 1588 it was valued at 20l. Communicants 82. 18l. 18s.
It was held for a long time as a donative, that is, from about 1670 to 1732, and a curate was licenced to serve in it; but in the latter year the Rev. Curties Wightwick took out the seals for it, and was presented to it as a vicarage, by the lord chancellor; on his resignation in 1751, it was again held in sequestration, and continues so at this time.
There is a terrier of this rectory, dated Aug. 24, 1615, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.
Church of St. Mary Bredin.

PATRONS,VICARS.
Or by whom presented.
William Dobbynson, in 1556.
Thomas Panton, in 1572.
The Queen, hac vice.John Milner, A. B. March 27, 1596, resigned 1599.
Richard Hardres, esq. of HardresJohn Taylor, A. M. Feb
. 24, 1599, resigned 1601.
Christopher Cage, Dec. 6, 1606, resigned 1610.
John Shepherd, Sept. 8, 1610, and in 1636.
William Lovelace, in 1663.

After which this vicarage seems to have been considered as a donative, and a perpetual curate was appointed to it; however, in 1737 I find it held as a sequestration, for it was then committed as such to

Henry Shove, clerk, who was appointed to it on January 15, 1737.
Thomas Leigh, clerk, succeeded him on Oct. 1737.

and continued so till Curteis Wightwick, A. M. was presented to it by the lord chancellor, on Nov. 23, and inducted the 26th, 1742; he resigned the vicarage in 1751, when it was again put in sequestration, and Thomas Leigh, clerk, was again appointed to it, after whose death Gilman Wall, A. M. was appointed on Jan. 20, 1775, and is the present sequestrator of it.

From: 'Canterbury: The churches within the city and suburbs', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent:
 Volume 11 (1800), pp. 209-288. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63667  Date accessed: 27 January 2009.

 

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