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Author Topic: Amy Johnson  (Read 19276 times)

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Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2016, 09:01:48 »
Yes, looks a very good representation although had she been facing the other way it would have been looking towards where she ditched. It is to be hoped the local scrap metal thieves will let her remain there in peace.

Offline conan

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2016, 20:29:56 »
The statue is now in place, and I think it looks absolutely splendid.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-37395430
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline JCS

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2016, 13:19:04 »
Thanks for the additional information John.  Sadly too late for me to attend but I have found this link:

http://www.canterburytimes.co.uk/Memorial-service-air-ace-Amy-Johnson-held-Herne/story-28465791-detail/story.html

It also looks as if there is good news over the proposed statue of Amy.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2016, 10:05:42 »
Herne Bay is organising a bronze statue of Amy to be erected on the seafront sometime soon.  I believe they are organising various events to mark the 75 years.   Last years airshow was in her name too.


Offline JCS

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2016, 09:10:20 »
Just bringing this back to the top as today marks 75 years since Amy Johnson perished in the Thames Estuary somewhere off Herne Bay (I think).  Also remembering Lt-Cdr Walter Fletcher who made an unsuccessful attempt to save Amy - he died later the same day from exposure.  Fletcher was buried in the Naval Section at Woodlands Rd cemetery in Gillingham and,as has been said previously, was awarded a posthumous Albert Medal in May 1941.

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2012, 09:55:09 »
Lieutenant Commander Fletcher was give a posthumous award of the Albert Medal for his actions.

This was announced in the London Gazette on 16 May 1941

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/35164/supplements/2804/page.pdf

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2012, 23:08:16 »
Not the whole report as i refuse to sign up to odd websites but:


Yesterday, an old soldier, Tom Mitchell of Crowborough in Kent, claimed that it was he who shot the heroine down when she twice failed to give the correct identification code during a routine flight on 5 January 1941. Eleven years earlier, Johnson had stunne
d the world, breaking gender stereotypes and taboos of the time, by flying solo from England to Australia as part of a ... [/i]

[/i]

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-4968918.html

Tom Mitchell was a gunner with the 58th (Kent) Heavy Anti-aircraft Regiment at Iwade. In the interview Tom explained how an officer had radioed the aircraft to request the "colours of the day", coloured flares to identify the aircraft as British. Twice 'she' gave the wrong ones.
"sixteen rounds of shells were fired and the plane dived into the Thames Estuary. We all thought it was an enemy plane until the next day when we read the papers and discovered it was Amy. The officers told us never to tell anyone what happened."
There are several inconsistencies here.
1. The aircraft Amy was flying was on a delivery flight, it was not carrying a radio, this would be fitted once it had reached its squadron.
2. There was very heavy cloud, how did they know they had hit the aircraft? How did they know it had crashed in the Thames Estuary? The crash site was over 18 miles away.
3. Amy baled out at around 3.30pm. In 'Amy Johnson' by Midge Gillies, the author states that "Official records show that the battery attacked much later that afternoon.

Amy Johnson 1903-1941
Amy first flew solo in June 1929, a little later she became the first woman in Britain to receive a Ground Engineers licence.
In May 1930 she became the first woman to fly solo from Britain to Australia, for which she was awarded the CBE.
Other long distance flights followed. In May 1940 she joined the ATA (Air Transport Auxiliary), ferrying military aircraft around the country.

The following is based on;-
What Did Happen to Amy Johnson? by Roy Nesbit. Aeroplane Monthly, January and February 1988.
'Amy Johnson, Queen of the Air' Midge Gillies, isbn 075381 770 5.  2003.
An excellent account of Amy's life.

January 1941
Having just delivered an Airspeed Oxford to Prestwick, Ayrshire, Amy was given the choice of flying back in another Oxford, or, if she was too tired, to take the night train from Glasgow to London. Amy chose to fly the Oxford, due for delivery to Kidlington, Oxfordshire.
She arrived at Squires Gate airfield, Lancashire in the early evening of 4th January 1941, and stayed the night with her sister, telling her of her concern that the Oxford's compass was slightly out.
The next day, 5th January, Amy took off for Kidlington at 11.49hrs BST. There was no cloud at Squires Gate, but visibility was poor. A thin layer of stratus covered the midlands and south-east England, the base between 800-2,000ft. Above this layer there was almost no cloud at all. From above it would have appeared as an unbroken layer of low cloud. Despite the poor weather, Amy decided to continue with the flight.
Amy should have reached Kidlington just over an hour into the flight, but with pylons and masts nearby as well as high ground, it would have been very dangerous to have come down though the low cloud. Rather than return to Squires Gate it seems that Amy flew east over the lower and flatter land of East Anglia in an attempt to find a break in the clouds and approach Kidlington from the east.

Lost, running out of fuel, and unable to find a break in the clouds, Amy soon had little choice but to bale out.
Seeing some barrage balloons above the low cloud, she circled, then jumped, not realizing that she was over water.
On December 17th 1940, a German mine had exploded beneath the barrage balloon drifter 'Carry on' killing its crew. Other mines were suspected and six other drifters were evacuated, the balloons left flying from the vessels.
Amy probably saw these balloons as she circle over the Thames Estuary.
Nearby was convoy CE 21, sailing from Southampton to the Thames. 17 merchant vessels escorted by, among others, five balloon barrage vessels of Q Flight, 952 (Thames Barrage) Squadron, including HMS Haslemere, captained by Lieutenant-Commander Walter Fletcher.
The convoy was flying its balloons at 1,800ft, ie, above the cloud. It was normal procedure to bring the balloons below cloud unless there were enemy aircraft around. The Luftwaffe was in the area and was about to attack.

Several seamen saw a parachutist drop through the low cloud. An aircraft circled the parachutist, then crashed into the sea. The seamen also saw another object fall which they thought might be another person.
The position of the crash was given as 051o33'20" North 001o12'4"East. The time was about 3.30pm. There was snow and sleet, a freezing wind and a choppy sea.
The parachutist came down astern of HMS Haslemere which tried to turn but went aground, her engines were then put in slow astern.
As Amy drifted towards the ship, the seamen heard her call out and ropes were thrown towards her, but she was unable to grasp them. Seaman Raymond A.C. Dean climbed down over the ships side and, laying on the rubbing stake, attemped to reach her. He was unable to do so and Amy disappeared under the stern and was never seen again.
Walter Fletcher ordered Dean back on board. Fletcher then stripped off and dived over the side, swimming towards and reaching the second 'body'. The ships lifeboat was launched, but the wind and the tide were against the untrained crew.
HMS ML113 threw a Carley float over the side and three men got in, Fletcher let go of what he was holding and started to swim towards the float. Lt George A, Wright RM stripped off and swam towards Fletcher, who was clearly in some difficulty. Wright towed Fletcher back to the float, which then returned to ML113. By now Fletcher was unconscious.
The Luftwaffe then attacked, a Junkers JU88 attempted to bomb the rearmost ship. There were no casualties.
Lt Cdr Walter E. Fletcher never regained consciousness and died at the Royal Naval Hospital in Gillingham.
Amy was flying alone in the Oxford. The second 'body' was probably an overnight pigskin bag that she had taken with her.
It is likely that Amy was killed by the ships propeller.
Amy was not shot down by the Germans. Neither side reported any aerial sightings or combat.

Lt Cdr Walter E. Fletcher was 34 when he died. In 1934, on secondment from the RN, he served as a navigator in a polar expedition across Baffin Land in Canada. In September 1940, he stayed calmly at his post as his vessel came under fire from German emplacements at Cap Gris Nez, his Sub-Lieutenant killed beside him and his first Lieutenant wounded, Like Amy he was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Socirty.

Jason, the little De Havilland Gipsy Moth that Amy flew to Australia, is preserved in the Science Museum London.

Golden Age Pioneers-Amy Johnson http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZRg6bPJ8jE


Offline Paul

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2009, 19:10:26 »
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2009, 15:29:40 »
Not the whole report as i refuse to sign up to odd websites but:

SHE WAS the feminist icon of her time, the first woman to fly solo to Australia. But the fatal crash that claimed Amy Johnson's life has always been shrouded in mystery.

Now it seems that her death was a cruel combination of bad luck, a bad memory and a keen gunner at an anti-aircraft battery on the river Thames.

Yesterday, an old soldier, Tom Mitchell of Crowborough in Kent, claimed that it was he who shot the heroine down when she twice failed to give the correct identification code during a routine flight on 5 January 1941. Eleven years earlier, Johnson had stunned the world, breaking gender stereotypes and taboos of the time, by flying solo from England to Australia as part of a ...


`I shot down Amy Johnson's plane' admits old soldier | Article ...  ... memory and a keen gunner at an anti-aircraft battery on the river Thames. ... "The reason Amy was shot down was because she...soldiers based at Iwade on ...

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-4968918.html

Offline kyn

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2008, 14:15:45 »
Thanks merc, good to see its all being kept tidy!  I must get round to having a look around myself soon.

merc

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2008, 13:52:39 »
The Times - Tuesday, Jan 14, 1941.
Naval Officers Bravery

Admiration for the bravery of Lieutenant Commander Walter Edmund Fletcher, R.N., of H.M. Trawler Haslemere, who lost his life when he dived overboard from the vessel in a rescue attempt when Miss Amy Johnson's aeroplane crashed in the Thames Estuary, was expressed by the Coroner at the resumed inquest on the body at Chatham yesterday.
Evidence of identification, for which the inquest had been adjourned was given by Miss Irene Fletcher, a sister.  A police officer stated that further evidence was not yet available, and the Coroner further adjourned the hearing.





Offline kyn

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Re: Amy Johnson
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2008, 14:08:30 »
I've checked all my war grave pics but haven't found his one.  I don't have all of the ones at Halfway though and there are other grave yards on the island i haven't been to.  He may not even be on the island.  Woodlands Cemetery in Gillignahm might be worth a look as most military burials happened there...

rogercarol

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Amy Johnson
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2008, 21:34:51 »
How spooky is this?
I have just picked up my copy of Dalys History of Sheppey to check on dates to put on Colins post about Arthur Cassell and a peice of paper fell out. It's type written but unsigned. I have used this book on hundreds of occasions as a reference book and never come across this note. I'll copy it here as it's typed and see what everyone thinks.

Both my neighbour and myself found this
History very interesting.
I worked under the War Office in Senior
 Officers's School (formerly the
 Hospital)
Also in Admiralty House -stone floors
 on ground and basement level, like a
 'fidge in the
 winter. Lovely entrance
 Hall and staircase.
 Did a stint in Garrison Point (signals)
  was on duty the Sunday Miss Amy Johnson
  came down in her 'plane, we lost a
  young Naval Officer from a mine -
  sweeper, who dived in to try and save
  Miss Johnson.

Was the hospital referred to the hospital on Well Marsh?
Was it turned into a Senior Officers School?
Does any one know the full Amy Johnson story?
What was the name of the mine sweeper?
 Who was the young Naval officer?
Was he posthumously awarded?
If not why not?

I only wish there was a name on it ???
Roger

 

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