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Author Topic: RAF Manston  (Read 68908 times)

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Mark_S

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #39 on: November 22, 2010, 12:05:18 »
As someone who has taken a great interest in the history of narrow gauge military and military support railways of Kent and South East London over the years, I am fascinated by this discussion thread. We now know why the Pentewan Railway's equipment was requsitioned, although we do as yet not know whether CANOPUS' stablemate PIONEER (which had, ironically, once been a Chattenden & Upnor locomotive) also worked at Manston. The one fact that tends to suggest that this may not have been the case is that the two locomotives were ultimately offered for disposal from different sites (PIONEER from Newbury Racecourse and CANOPUS from West Drayton) although this
is not conclusive. The general style of the 1923 Map is strongly suggestive that the line connecting Manston with the main line network was at that time still narrow gauge and would have used the 2ft. 6in. gauge equipment, the 2ft. gauge lines being used for internal constructional needs. If one examines the Drawings List in the HMRS Archive, under the 'Unidentified' section ex-Bristol Carriage & Wagon Co. Drawing No. 11026 (which would almost certainly have dated from 1918) is listed as a 2ft. 6in. gauge workmans car (known to be of covered 'toastrack' pattern). Was this the design of workmans' car used to convey the construction workers to and from Manston in 1918-1923?

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #38 on: November 21, 2010, 18:30:34 »
The only railway line at Manston was the line from the new camp to the main railway line at Birchington, this was used to bring coal for the power station, petrol for aircraft, and building materials. You could travel as a passenger in the guards van, and pick up the main line service. Although it was normally quicker to travel to Margate station and pick up the main line service from there. Never any rail line at the Royal Naval Air Service Westgate Bay Site.

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #37 on: November 19, 2010, 20:30:17 »
Vickers Virginia 500 squadron County of Kent. 
Only one so called underground hangar will show up on Google or any other recent aerial photo this will be the one in Allard Grange road,the pit is in use by a riding school, the one between this site and the main road is now completly filled in.
The other two that were on the Margate rd, ie Past the Drome garage were never completed, the one on the same side as the garage is now used by a demolition company,the fourth which was on the other side of the road never got past being a shallow trench.
There were only four hangars planned, not five as has been suggested.If you are that intereste
d check out the RAF Manston History Museum.

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #36 on: November 19, 2010, 17:26:04 »
The aircraft were at Manstopn for checking by the Civil Aviation Authirty before prceeding to Duxford for the Battle of Britain film. none of the aircraft are in service with the Spanish air-force,most have been scrapped, although one He 111 is being rebuilt.

Offline Alastair

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #35 on: November 19, 2010, 17:08:51 »
Does anyone remember seeing 3 He111's and some Me109's prior to the filming of The Battle of Britain back in the 60's? Terrific sight - all lined up by the Ramsgate Road end. They were part of the Spanish Air Force, apparently. Maybe they still are.
Alastair

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #34 on: September 20, 2010, 19:06:19 »
The arrestor system was last used in the 1990s, shortly after being used as training exercise, to snatch a Phanton jet which was being brought in for the fire school. The system was not permantely rigged for use. Yes there are photos of the last time the system was in use can be seen at the RAF Manston History Museum.

seafordpete

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #33 on: September 20, 2010, 09:32:47 »
Doug, what ever they were used for it was defiantly at Manston about 1975 'ish.
Manston was one of the early stations that had FIDO installed- could the pipes and gullies relate to that? I agree with other comments a Bangalore torpedo would not have the "poke" to take up tarmac and concrete.

In the 70s an arrester net system was installed to stop aircraft in an emergency- any photos of it out there?

Andyb

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #32 on: August 23, 2010, 08:20:50 »
Doug, what ever they were used for it was defiantly at Manston about 1975 'ish.

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #31 on: August 23, 2010, 07:51:39 »
Bangalore torpedos are only capable of creating shallow trenching, often Moled into position,During recovery works by EOD in the 1970s, after removal of PSP layed during ww2, some demolition charges ie, Bangalore torpedos were found, none in tunnels.

Offline grandarog

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2010, 21:30:25 »
The reference to tunnels under the runway may well be to the underground pipes that were laid in when runways were built during WW2 to house the Bangalor Torpedoes to rip the runway up across its breadth in numerous positions down the entire length if the need arose.

medwayboy

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #29 on: August 22, 2010, 20:41:46 »
Emergency landing at Manston 8th June 1965....

http://www.bywat.co.uk/manston.html

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #28 on: August 22, 2010, 19:38:58 »
Works to the main runway in the seventies, were if my memory is correct consisted of re-caulking the joints between the concrete, the centre strip of runway, Manston being three parallel strips, was resurfaced with tarmac for which a batching plant was built at the Minster end of the runway. The runway used for aircraft landing today is about 24 inchs thick, the outer runway strips called the north and south sterile no longer in use.
The stories about tunnels underneath the runway are more likely to relate to the runway drain which is about 2ft 6inchs in diameter and vents out into Pegwell bay,there are no reports in the MOD report of 1993 which rec
ords all works on the runway from 1943 which was the year construction of the main 28/10 runway commenced.

Andyb

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #27 on: August 21, 2010, 13:45:42 »
Ive been told that when they renewed part of the runway in the early 70's they built tunnels
with trapdoors that come out underneath the appron so special forces were able to get under
an Aircraft without being seen.
The idea was to divert hijacked flights there.
Dont know how true it is ???

I remember Bowzells the civil engineering firm that was based in upper Walmer, Deal, done a lot of work at Manston in the 70's, I remember seeing plans on an office wall showing detailed work at Manston. They also made very large steel formers for concrete that when bolted together was easily 5m in diameter. Alas that is the extent of my memory. Bowzells also built the new sea wall in Deal.

Andy

DoverDan

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #26 on: August 19, 2010, 23:14:33 »
The photo is from a book called 'The Blitz then and now' volume one first edition 1987 ISBN: 0 900913 45 2.
One of the best purchases i've made recently! i got volume two as well which focuses mainly on the London blitz but just as fascinating. Now i just need to track down volume three!! :)

medwayboy

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2010, 23:00:35 »
Great picture Doverdan.....  Where did you get it ??  

 

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