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Author Topic: RAF Manston  (Read 70119 times)

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AnDy

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #54 on: June 19, 2011, 16:28:03 »
Manston today!

I used to know the names of all the WW2 aircraft when I was a lad. Is this one a Lancaster?

Sure is, PA474.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #53 on: June 19, 2011, 16:09:41 »
Manston today!

I used to know the names of all the WW2 aircraft when I was a lad. Is this one a Lancaster?





ETA

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #52 on: March 20, 2011, 19:42:52 »
Ive been told that when they renewed part of the runway in the early 70's they built tunnels
with trapdoors that come out underneath the appron so special forces were able to get under
an Aircraft without being seen.
The idea was to divert hijacked flights there.
Dont know how true it is ???

Complete fiction.

seafordpete

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #51 on: March 20, 2011, 15:23:36 »
manston was extended further when the USAF had it and themn maintained as a diversion field and was apparently capable of taking Concord

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #50 on: January 01, 2011, 19:51:06 »
Although i think it has been recorded before on the forum, the so called underground hangars at Manston were a standard, steel frame building built in a large pit, there was never at any stage any thought of covering the building with soil. The hangars of a large size for this period were designed to take the Handley Page bombers. By the time two hangars were completed the war was coming to a close, the other two hangars were never completed. The two completed hangars were removed in the 1930s. no use of the hangar sites was made by the RAF after this period, this information is from checks carried out and progress photos from the IWM, Royal Engineers Li
brary,and The Fleet Air Arm Library.

LenP

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #49 on: December 15, 2010, 22:19:55 »
Quote
Used in the film "The War Lover" It was during the filming off Dover that one of the stunt men lost his life whilst filming a baling out sequence.His parachute failed to open.

As featured in the latest issue of 'After the Battle'.

ealdwita

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #48 on: December 12, 2010, 20:39:46 »
I was fortunate enough to be stationed at Manston (1968-72) The cushiest posting ever! We had one of the married quarter bungalows (now demolished) built by the Americans and called 'Tobacco Houses'. It took several strong men (and a horse) to drag me away from there!

Offline unfairytale

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #47 on: December 10, 2010, 20:48:35 »
The fuel tanks at Manson.

From the book: RAF Manston in old photographs.
ISBN 0-7509-0135-7
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #46 on: December 10, 2010, 17:06:35 »
Fido was in operation from 1944 to 1958, the fuel tanks that stored the petrol were demolished early in 2010. The only remains to the system is the pump house where the railway sideing was at sevenscore.

AnDy

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #45 on: December 10, 2010, 16:14:35 »

I am interested in the FIDO installed at Manston, fuel consumption, efficiency etc?

'Operating FIDO at Manston was a 24 hour task, as the fuel system was quite complicated. The fuel was pumped from 4 tanks, each of 350,000 gallons capacity, on the south side of the runway 29 (these are still standing and a presently used by Jentx Ltd)

There were 12 fuel pumps, each able to deliver 450 gallons a minute to a control point known as the valve house. From this point, the fuel was divided into three channels; one to the left of the runway, one to the right,
and one to an approach box. These "field lines" as they were known, were buried approximately three fett underground and 75 yards from the runway, so as not to cause obstruction. The lines were divided into 19 sections, 260 yards in length, each with its own vaporiser, burner and control pit. The pit operators ignited the fuel and controlled its flow to the vaporiser. When the fuel had been vaporised, it flowed back into the burner where it automatically ignited'

'To burn FIDO for one hour used 250,000 gallons of fuel at a cost of 45,000. Contaminated fuel was used to minimize expenditure, but it still cost 3 shillings and 6 pence three farthings (17p) a gallon'


Taken from 'The history of RAF Manston' 3rd Edition ISBN 0 9511298 0 5

dave

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #44 on: December 10, 2010, 14:40:51 »

I am interested in the FIDO installed at Manston, fuel consumption, efficiency etc?

Offline Ted Ingham

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #43 on: December 03, 2010, 10:44:02 »
Just for interest,I happened to be cycling through the Airport when the Germans landed.Thought I had gone through a time warp.Then realised it was part of the making of "The Battle of Britain" film in 1969 ish.
Second time that has happened to me.I was cutting across the thresh hold when a Flying Fortress cut across.They were filming "The War Lover".Photo to follow.
Regards, Ted









Used in the film "The War Lover" It was during the filming off Dover that one of the stunt men lost his life whilst filming a baling out sequence.His parachute failed to open.
NO.The tail didn't fall off.

Mark_S

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #42 on: November 22, 2010, 22:01:03 »
Might "Canopus" and its 2ft. 6in. gauge stock have been used in the construction of the SG branch in a similar fashion to the way in which an 18 inch gauge construction line was used for the Longmoor system? This may have been shielded from railway historians as a consequence of the wartime situation.

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #41 on: November 22, 2010, 19:10:34 »
The photographs i have of the railway line at Manston is normal gauge, we still had some of the track in position up till about 1985.
and reports on the rest of the track confirm it was normal gauge. But if you want to lose some money make a bet.

Offline doug

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Re: RAF Manston
« Reply #40 on: November 22, 2010, 19:03:11 »
Lets try and clarify the Manston railway line, ran from the new camp at Manston to a junction about two hundred yards from the station at Birchington on the up line. It was off normal gauge. The line shown on the ordance survey map is the only large scale map i have seen to show the whole course of the railway. When we built the model that is in the RAF Manston museum, we used the original works blue print for that site. At the Manston end were a selection of sideings, serving the coal yard, the power station, the unloading bays into the hangars used by the school of technical training, with a sideing also used for cleaning out the boilers.
Any other railway lines at Manston were of a short term nature, ie Narrow gauge used for dump trucks on the underground hangar sites, with some normal gauge used for moving large steam shovels etc. But as has been said before these lines were of a very temporay nature, and i really do not think any body would bother putting them on a map.The line from the camp to Birchington was inuse for 7years.  

 

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