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Author Topic: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)  (Read 14291 times)

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merc

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Thanks Cliveh :)

Offline cliveh

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    • Kent's Historical Sites
A few photos of the turret exterior:















cliveh

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2011, 10:05:23 »
Thanks for that. Hey Ho. Always the same old story scrap half of the good stuff and leave what is to hard to be bothered with. Good job the guns were too hard to get out then or they would be spread all over Germany in the 1940's. Sentinel S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

david

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Re: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2011, 09:05:47 »
Sorry Setinel S4, they are not there.
The engines, boilers, ammunition lift, power rammer, all gone. The over head traveller in the shell store, gone. It was there at least until 1938. Second World War scrap? Dover Harbour Board's emergency generator fills the shell store.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2011, 09:45:59 »
I know that big guns are impressive and so are the bangs they make, they appeal to the little boy in all of us. Has anyone bothered to take some pics of the engine and boilers? Just out of interest and to complete the study so to speak............ Sentinel S4.  :) :)
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline JohnG

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Re: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2011, 21:11:04 »
I took this photograph last week at Eastney Barracks.  The shell is 16 inch the same as those used by Turret guns.  There would be a gas check plate attached to the bottom.
JohnG




DoverDan

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Re: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2010, 15:43:23 »
Sentry duty at the pier turret battery during the harsh winter of 1939/40.

the gun in view was one of the two 6" Mk7 guns in place at the outbreak of war.

delboy

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Re: Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2010, 14:31:38 »
 If you can get hold of a copy of this booklet its full of information, published by North Kent Books , Rochester 1987. ISBN 0-948305-02-9., delboy

 

rossco

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Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2010, 12:24:47 »
My Dad and brother got shown round the turret the other week. I guess that's the benefit of fishing the Admiralty all weathers!

david

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Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2009, 09:37:59 »
You want lower levels? I can do lower levels!
Taken in 1993.














Davids Mate

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Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2009, 21:31:23 »
I can't remember for sure, early to mid eighties at best guess. It was a bit of a shambles as the DHB chap who the arrangements were made with cleared off on holiday without telling anyone else about it. By the time a body was found and transport organised we didn't get a lot of time inside. The kids were a pain and nothing to do with us, it was a mixed group and there always seemed to be someone in the way. Still, nice to have had the chance to see it.

Be good if you could get hold of the photos you mentioned. We never got down to the lower level, there was no light down there and it was a bit wet I recall.

Offline unfairytale

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Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2009, 20:33:59 »
The magazine room and the room containing the steam engine were rewired at the end of last year for new lighting etc. My neighbour's brother did it and he took loads of photos. I'll ask him next time I see him.
 Dover sea angling club had the keys to the turret for years but last year DHB changed all the locks and declared the place unsafe due to an unsafe floor. And then rewired the place.

When were your photos taken Davids mate. I see the oblgatory small boy in the picture.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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david

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Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2008, 18:52:51 »
Here they are:







Edit: Moved files to Photobucket.

merc

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Pier Turret, Pier Turret Battery, Pier Extension Battery (Dover)
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2008, 13:51:08 »
There's also some nice drawings and photo's of the guns at http://www.doverturret.co.uk/

(Extracted from the Dover Express - 20th July 1885)

 
"The first practice on the two eight-one ton guns in the turret at the end of the Admiralty Pier, took place on Monday. The signal guns from the Drop Redoubt were discharged soon after nine o'clock, and owing to previous rumours of the damage that the firing might do, the windows all over the town were opened and immense crowds turned out on the seafront to witness the effects. The Woolwich Committee, however, did not arrive until noon. All things were then in readiness, but owing to the north-west wind the straits were crowded with shipping coming out of the Downs, and a clear course could not be found for the projectile. The interval afforded time to examine the machinery of the turret.

Down in the solid concrete, below sea level, is the engine room, where are fixed three double-action engines of two hundred indicated horsepower each used in working the machinery of the turret, and a smaller engine for loading. The turret itself revolves on thirty-two wheels worked by a shaft which runs up the centre of the masonry. the guns lie in the upper chamber of the armoured turret ten feet apart, their muzzles projecting a yard through the port holes in front of them when in position for firing, and the recoil after the discharge is eight feet six inches. The recoil is arrested by strong buffers, and it is held by the machinery in the backward position until reloaded. There is some very ingeniously contrived machinery by which the charge of 450 lbs of powder, and the shell 1700 lbs, are put into the gun from a loading chamber within the turret by the aid of a small engine. The whole of the machinery is directed by a man who stands in a man-hole that looks out on the top of the gun. In the base of the turret is a large magazine over which there are lifts and appliances by which the guns can be loaded in two minutes and a half.

Monday's experiments were witnessed by the Committee of Experts, including Sir F. Douglas, Mr. Drace, C.E., Colonel Close, Lieut. Willett and Mr. Groves; also Major-General Newdigate, Commondant of the Garrison, Colonel Gordon, R.E., Colonel Goodenough, R.A., Colonel Buebanan, Colonel Knight, Major Plunkett and Major Sturt.

A clear course was secured at one o'clock, and five minutes later an immense volume of smoke belched forth and very shortly, at what appeared but a mile distant the projectile struck the water and afterwards made three more appearances at a great distance. The sound was not louder than is often heard at the firing of the noon gun, and everything connected with the turret seemed as solid as a rock. The first charge consisted of two hundred and fifty pounds of powder and seventeen hundred pounds weight of the projectile, and the elevation was calculated for a range of six miles. the second charge was 337 lbs. of powder. the sighting was done by Colonel Goodenough, R.A., who did not budge an inch from his post at the trial shot. The second shot was fired nearly an hour later, owing to the ships hanging in the way, the projectile being the same weight as before. The last three rounds were fired with a full battering charge of four hundred and fifty pounds of powder, and the same weight projectile. None of the discharges caused the slightest shock in the town, but three small panes of glass were broken in the lighthouse. In the magazine of the fort a piece of timber was nicely balanced and two cups filled with water placed on each end and not a drop was spilt; and it is hardly necessary to state that the cliff sustained no damage whatever. The loading of the guns was on this occasion done from the outside owing to the machinery in the loading chamber not being ready. The whole of the experiments were considered very satisfactory. The guns will not be fired again for a long time."

 

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