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Author Topic: Hythe - School of Musketry  (Read 6643 times)

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Offline filmer01

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Re: Hythe - School of Musketry
« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2016, 10:16:45 »
I find it odd that these (and the other photos in the IWM collection referenced) do not show any prone shooters using the rifle sling (carrying strap) to steady their weapons. It only takes seconds to get into and then the gun is much, much more stable, is kept pressed into the shoulder and its weight is better supported. Give any target shooter a gun with a two-point sling and they would never try and just hold it.

Image13 in the miniature rifle range (what we would call small-bore these days .22LR) is interesting, the shooters have their ammunition in blocks beside them, but the kneeling NCO who appears to be instructing, has left his rifle on the firing point with the breech closed - it would need to be open to "show clear" on any range that I used.....
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Hythe - School of Musketry
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2016, 22:57:54 »
Photos taken 21 January 1915.

IWM (Q 54112) Troops of various regiments firing from behind cover at the School of Musketry at Hythe, 1917. (IWM give the date as 1917, but another photo in the series, clearly taken at the same time (see link below), gives the date as 21 January 1915. I think all the photos in the series were taken in 1915. HC.)

IWM (Q 53552) A British soldier takes part in snap shooting instruction with a Short Magazine Lee Enfield rifle at the British Army School of Musketry in Hythe, 21 January 1915.

IWM (Q 53546) British soldiers take part in rifle training, loading their small Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE) rifles in the prone position at the British Army School of Musketry in Hythe, 21 January 1915.

IWM (Q 53549) British soldiers using the minature rifle range during their training at the British Army School of Musketry in Hythe, 21 January 1915.

IWM (Q 53550) British officers practice using Vickers machine guns during their training at the British Army School of Musketry in Hythe, 21 January 1915.

More photos @ http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?query=hythe%20school%20of%20musketry&items_per_page=20
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Offline kyn

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Re: Hythe - School of Musketry
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2010, 16:35:50 »



Offline Longpockets

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Re: Hythe - School of Musketry
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2010, 18:28:56 »

Colour Sergeant Bourne DCM, played by Nigel Green in the film ZULU, was appointed Adjutant of the School of Musketry at Hythe in Kent in 1893.

Taken from here -

http://www.rorkesdriftvc.com/defenders/bourne.htm

http://www.rorkesdriftvc.com/index.html

I was investigating a census a while ago and came across him, a VC researcher I was in contact with,  very knowledgeable on Army matters, pointed out the entry in the census was Colour Sergeant Bourne DCM.

In tribute to Michael Caine - "Not a lot of people know that".

Cheers.

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Hythe - School of Musketry
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2010, 16:38:55 »
From the United Services Magazine 1865.
Hythe School of Musketry - The three months course of instruction has commenced. The detachments for this course are from the 4th, 7th, 18th, 19th, 23rd, 38th, 41st, 42nd, 44th, 49th, 54th, 63rd, 77th, 89th, 82nd, 88th, 95th, 99th, 1st and 2nd Rifles, and the H.E.I.C.S. Each detachment consists of an officer and eight sergeants.

It is interesting to note that the detachments named were brought together from as far afield as Stirling, Fermoy, The Curragh, Jersey, Plymouth, Birmingham, as well as closer in from Dover and Aldershot where no range facilities at that time existed. However not a single one from the Central Infantry Depot at Chatham where, coincidentally, a 1,000 yard range did exist, possibly suggesting that musketry drill at Chatham was sufficient..

Offline kyn

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Hythe - School of Musketry
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2010, 16:52:52 »
The barracks in 1829

And 1859

 

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