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Author Topic: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)  (Read 59488 times)

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Guest

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2010, 05:11:47 »
Doug: You say you took the negs home - have you still got them? If not, what happened to them?

Offline doug

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2010, 19:17:53 »
Working at the Deal Barracks some years ago, we were converting the area used by WORKS and BRICKS into Luxury apartments, well thats what the estate agent said. On pulling down some of the ceilings found a load of glass negatives from the contstruction of Dover Harbour, Took them home, the builder was only interested in money not history.No doubt there was plenty more somewhere on the site.

delboy

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2010, 18:19:43 »
Hi all!

Can anyone please tell me if the railway along the Eastern Arm was standard or narrow gauge or both? If it was standard did it connect to the seafront line along to Admiralty Pier?

TIA
 cliveh
Hi cliveh, the rail line was standard size and ran from Eastern Arm and connected to the mainline in Strond street by the old harbour station. There was a movable platform to allow the trains through. There are some posts on here under Harbour railways, delboy

Offline cliveh

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2010, 15:00:09 »
Hi all!

Can anyone please tell me if the railway along the Eastern Arm was standard or narrow gauge or both? If it was standard did it connect to the seafront line along to Prince of Wales Pier?

TIA
 cliveh

delboy

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2010, 15:31:49 »
Quite a few years ago ( I almost said once upon a time) I was at a jumble sale and in amongst someones old schoolbooks I found a partial copy of a book called Great Engineering Feats Of The World. I found inside some pictures of the construction of Dover Harbour, that I managed to salvage.Unfortunately the rest of the pages were completely ruined but I have dug  out the ones I have and scanned them.  The book was published in the 1920s but had been throughly vandalised with wax crayon scribbling on most of the pages that hadn,t been pulled out. I have done both sides so you can read a little of the article, Page 365 should have followed 363, delboy








Offline TowerWill

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2010, 09:02:55 »
Regarding the terrace that leaves the site of the clifftop railway,slopes gently down then ends in a drop to the main terrace below.This might have been part of the zigzag required to get trains to the docks below but was lost when the cliff was carved back even further.Any rolling stock left on the lower section might have eventually been taken away via the seafront railway.There was another line laid on the incline between the line on the top of the cliff and the terrace.This incline still exists but i can't recall the gradient on it.Going by my experiences on the Folkestone Harbour branch they must have had trouble on these inclines.Even on the East Kent Light Railway the second man and myself sometimes had to walk ahead sanding the rails as the driver inched the loaded coal train up the bank to Shepherdswell.Looks like they had a loco each end here though.Apart from the gradients this would have been a requirement if the wagons were unfitted as a runaway wagon would have been lethal.  

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2010, 22:36:45 »
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline TowerWill

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2010, 22:02:37 »
A site by "Southern E-Group" gives an interesting description of the Martin Mill line and it's route plus many more articles which i'm going to have a look at.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2010, 18:50:09 »
In the 1960's we had an interesting walk along the railway track from the clifftop end to Martin Mill Station.It does indeed run above the Langdon Holes which we were using as a "camp" in those days(a bit heavy on candles though).The terrace i mentioned would have climbed gently up from the Eastern Docks and eventually passed just below the Langdon Hole twin entrances which were dug into the side of a steep bank.By then it was just a track paved with clinker.To get onto the lowest end of this terrace we would climb through the fence on the East Cliff path where a very narrow and rough path led down to what was left of this terrace.In the cliff face close to this rough path was a quite deep,unlined cave.I don't know what it's purpose was but people used to sleep rough in it.This little rough path was situated between Athol Terrace and where the Jubilee Way Viaduct now crosses over the East Cliff path.On the other side of the viaduct where there are steps on the East Cliff path there was another,slightly easier to use,narrow path down to the terrace.Access to this was was also gained by climbing through the fence.The very lowest part of the terrace had long been carved away so it was not possible to get down to the Eastern Docks by that route.The G.E. photo in General Defences>Crop Marks clearly shows the path of the railway line to Martin Mill.

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2010, 23:01:06 »
The metal framework still stands on the cliff top. It was built in 1909 to stop chalk falling onto the Eastern Docks while chalk was being quarried. The track didn't actually go past Langdon hole tunnels. It passed on the terrace above them. The track that led from Athol terrace up to that metal fence was laid by Pearsons and William Crundall who had applied to build a tramway to St. Maragaret's. At about the same time Pearsons got the contract to build Marine Station. So they killed two birds with one stone and used the chalk from the tramway road for the building of Marine Station and other recamation work at the Western Docks. They laid the railway track to take the chalk down to the seafront, where it was shipped to the Western Docks. Later the Zig-zag was added to connect the line with the Eastern Docks.
 
  The track that orinally supplied materials for the building of the Eastern Docks was the track that was to become the Military Railway, although it had to be relaid as part of the original one, from Langdon Battery to the west terminus, was lifted in 1917 and laid along the seafront. The rest of the track from Langdon Battery to Martin Mill was removed and scrapped in 1937.

 The road that passes Langdon Hole tunnel was built for the tramway to St. Margaret's but the track was never laid,  it was used as roadway for some time though.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2010, 16:34:44 »
Here's one of the plaque being placed to commemorate the harbour's completion and opening by the then Prince of Wales.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline kyn

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Re: Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2010, 17:57:36 »
Dover Patrol in the harbour 1918.



1917

Offline unfairytale

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Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2010, 11:08:49 »
Priory Station seems to have moved!
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline unfairytale

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Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2010, 09:50:23 »
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline numanfan

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Dover Harbour (Admiralty Harbour)
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2009, 12:42:13 »
This one is post-marked 20th August 1926, although the picture may be from earlier.

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