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Author Topic: Guilford Colliery  (Read 8184 times)

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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2015, 16:50:03 »
The so called 'Winding House' was built in 1920 as a power station containing two large boilers to generate electricity to power a pump for removing water from the mine workings. Within a couple of months the colliery was closed. The power station must have been up and running because in 1922 it was recommended by Dover's Electricity Commission to ask the owners of the Guilford Colliery if they could provide a bulk supply of electricity to the town. It was costed at 13 to 14 thousand pounds to lay mains and build converters to carry power to Dover. Although by 1924 this hadn't yet happened.
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Offline keniff

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2011, 11:48:58 »
The winding house is on the market at the moment...For offers around 1,000,000! Not bad for a place that was once used by many of us cyclists as a handy place to answer the call of nature.

Here's the link   http://media.primelocation.com/SPGR/SPCB/SPCB_CAN110035/BROCH_01.pdf

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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2011, 11:30:49 »
The winding house is on the market at the moment...For offers around 1,000,000! Not bad for a place that was once used by many of us cyclists as a handy place to answer the call of nature.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Brimsdale

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2011, 18:52:35 »
This is probably a daft question, but why 'Guil(d)ford' Colliery at Dover? I'll admit I don't know Dover very well, but I've not heard of a Guildford near Dover, so why this name?

It is named after the Earl of Guilford whose family owned the land.  The Guilford family seat was Waldershare House which is close to the former colliery site.

omega4040

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2011, 20:35:53 »
As far as I know, the shafts at Guilford were never filled, only capped. I know of someone that used to soak rags in oil, light them then throw them down! Priot to capping the shafts were open, with just a brick ring round them to stop anyone accidentally staggering in! There are photos of these rings, they used to be hosted on commanet but this hasn't been working for a while.


Offline Leofwine

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2011, 16:13:11 »
This is probably a daft question, but why 'Guil(d)ford' Colliery at Dover? I'll admit I don't know Dover very well, but I've not heard of a Guildford near Dover, so why this name?
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Offline keniff

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Re: Guilford Colliery
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 13:53:13 »
Here is another plan of the colliery - almost the same as Islesy's - My brother-in-law works for a company in Doncaster (and has done since 1970) that was called Cementation and they sunk pit shafts and supplied pumps, navvy's (huge cranes) vibroflot machinery to the mining industry all over the world. They are now owned by a Swedish company and concentrate on bridge building.

He sent me this plan that he found whilst they were clearing out some old offices. Note the addition of the "D" in Guilford.



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Offline TowerWill

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Guilford Colliery
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2010, 16:38:37 »
I seem to recall reading somewhere(maybe the 'Dover Express')that an application to fill in the shafts at Guilford Colliery was refused.This was due to the possible contamination of the water table.Are the shafts just capped then?What about the shafts of the other Kent pits?

Offline Islesy

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Guilford Colliery
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2010, 14:15:16 »
Guilford was also known as Waldershare Colliery. It was started by Arthur Burr's Foncage Syndicate in 1906. Located in an isolated rural spot, all equipment and materials had to be hauled over farm fields or down muddy tracks, an impossibility in winter.

Three shafts were sunk but water was discovered at 1346ft and work stopped in 1910. It was sold together with Stonehall Colliery to a French company in 1919 who tried to use cementation to seal the shafts from water. It failed and the colliery was finally abandoned in 1921.

A lot of the lessons learnt in sinking the shafts were put to use when the Focage Syndicate started Snowdown Colliery - indeed it was the failure of Guilford that led them to develop their option on Snowdown.

Colliery Plan.


Shafts in plan.


The Winding house stood derelict for years, there used to be a burnt out car in there and I believe a few amateur films were shot there - including a few "action romances" :)
It has now been converted to a residence and is fantastic - it looks like this now.


A rail line linked Guilford to the EKLR at Eythorne (during WWII the spur was used by the Rail Guns).
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