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Author Topic: Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth  (Read 8562 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2017, 22:16:28 »
Restored my two pics :-)

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2011, 16:46:03 »
I went for a stroll down our local beach a few hours back and found a section of  vertebra in amongst the pyrite, this is around 50 million years old. here are two pictures, one of where I found it and the other in situ. just sitting there....




Offline Lyn L

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Re: Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2010, 16:12:29 »


Had a walk along the beach at Warden  but the only fossil we got was the dog ! well she looked almost like one after running out towards the water ( tide was out ) but boy did she enjoy rolling in the mud then the sand when she DID come back, home in a carrier bag again lol. We did look for fossils but didn't have equipment with us.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline kyn

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2009, 19:12:03 »
I only have two or three sharks teeth although have found others when i was a kid, most of my are small shells  o:)

Offline kyn

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2009, 16:49:55 »
I have more bits hidden away that i will have to dig out, but here is part of my meagre collection...

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2009, 11:06:06 »
 That cistern idea is one I used to use on potlids that were dug out of old victorian dumps. You gave them a dip in acid (hydrochloric) which removed the stains then put them in the cistern to remove the acid /salts. The constant change of water is what done the trick.

seafordpete

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2009, 10:25:38 »
. You then have to keep the specimen in a humidity of 50% or less, preferably sealing it in a plastic bag with silica.It states that coating it with varnish, dope or PVA appears to be of no value. It states that if specimen is dry to start with Silicon oil is water resistant and is of use. I will stick to the sharks/Ray

that is because the salt is hygroscopic and absorbs ambient moisture, crystals grow and crack up the specimen. Get rid of the salt -problem solved

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2009, 23:47:15 »
Virtualy every pyrite type fossil I have collected from the shore at eastchurch gap has turned to dust! even the nipa palm seeds which are quite robust gradualy fade away. In the book 'London clay fossils of the Isle of Sheppey' by Fred Clouter etc it states that soaking and soaking in fresh or distiled water and then thoroughly drying so pyrite disease does not start. You then have to keep the specimen in a humidity of 50% or less, preferably sealing it in a plastic bag with silica.It states that coating it with varnish, dope or PVA appears to be of no value. It states that if specimen is dry to start with Silicon oil is water resistant and is of use. I will stick to the sharks/Ray teeth, crabs and lobsters in nodules..if I find them of course. My children have taken many of these to our local school over the  years they were there and they seemed to be more robust.If you come to Sheppey at any point to look for fossils take my advice and go along beach via Warden Bay rather than down the cliffs at Warden point or Eastchurch gap as the cliffs are saturated clay and very very dangerous.

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2009, 22:48:06 »
I have not had a problem with pyritized fossils from here or Folkestone. The only 'things' that have fallen apart for me at actual opened pyrite nodules extracated from the chalk above Folkestone. However given the experiences of others and the preservation advice offered by experts I seem to have been very fortunate.

seafordpete

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2009, 21:25:21 »
According to my friend Ed who is a geologist you need the water treatment. The problem is due to salt impregnation, the cure put them in the cistern of your toilet for 6 months, the constant flushing removes the salt. Same for old wood, then soak it in a saturated sugar solution for about 2 weeks, it will stop it shrivelling and crumbling.
He was involved in lifting an assortment of Rhino, Hippo & elephant bones at East Peckham last year in thr gravel beds. Pete

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Fossils, Old Bones and Teeth
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2009, 19:45:55 »
Here's a Nautilid I found last year at Warden


 

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