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Author Topic: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station  (Read 26671 times)

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Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2010, 09:43:14 »
All i've found so far is in "Defending The Gateway" by David Burridge.On page 45 under "AA Miscellaneous" he's put "3148 4306 E of Long Hill: underground AA communications centre(?)"
 It's all a bit vague but might tie the place in with Frith Farm AA battery nearby.Still don't explain the means of transferring info from the radar stations about incoming enemy aircraft/v1's to Long Hill and then to the AA battery though.My late father was a radio operator with the R.C. of Signals and would give me advice with my very simple experiments with radio aerials so i've got a bit of an interest in the subject.But as most of my efforts were aimed at receiving signals on Long Wave from very far away they're not applicable to the Long Hill site.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2010, 21:06:09 »
I thought i could recall pipes coming out of the ground there unfairytale.As an OP have you any info on how it was used?I can remember a hole/holes in the roof and that is about it.I wonder how the place transmitted/received radio messages etc without aerials unless there was a landline.Like you i've never heard of any aerials up there.The present TV mast we learnt about when we found that my partner's house down in the Dover valley couldn't get Freeview from it.She had the aerial redirected to face the Hougham TV mast which provides Freeview channels OK.

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2010, 18:54:15 »
Unfairytale i might have missed some of the information on these posts but what was the brick built and concrete roofed structure on top of  Long Hill for?Did a pipe or similar go down to the tunnels below?As it was a radio station i wonder where it's aerials were situated.Somewhere on KHF i saw a photo of a WW2 wooden mast laying on it's side in the Great Lines area and was something like that once on Long Hill?

As far as I know it was just an observation post. I have heard nothing about an aerial being up there. The metal conduit which carried cables from the O.P. to the Long Hill tunnel is still sticking out of the ground right next to the post. The transmitter near Long Hill now was built in about 1980. I lived about 200 yards away at the time they were building it.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2010, 19:00:17 »
Thanks seafordpete.I didn't think about the electrical supply to the place.Perhaps i saw a genny exhaust pipe on the hilltop.I wish i'd asked my former employers of their memories of the place being built.
I'm now wondering if Long Hill Tunnels had a connection to the electrical mains,possibly a cable went up to the site via the Roman Road,and the genny was used in air/shell raids as at HMS Forward.

seafordpete

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2010, 17:30:02 »
As i mentioned earlier would a hole have been drilled down to the tunnels below for the purpose of bringing cables up to the structure?I have this memory of a fairly large bore metal pipe sticking out of the ground up on Long Hill,but again

Forward had a number of pipes down, 3 or 4" for aerial feeds, phone lines and civvy power ( back up genny was only run during air raid alerts) and a 10 or 12" exhaust air which had an extractor fan in it and a similar size for the genny exhaust. In coming air was through the entrance or if closed down through gas washing plant and filters.
Equipment wise it had radio transmitters and receivers & teleprinters as well as landline phones. The frames   for what we would now call modems for the teleprinters were higher than the tunnel so  a  pit about 2' deep was dug to house them. Tunnel height is 6' in the adit and 8' in the working areas.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2010, 17:05:54 »
Thankyou for that interesting technical info seafordpete.It's given me an insight in what the place was for.Unfairytale's photos show the structure on top of Long Hill.Going on my memories of 40 or 50 years ago when it was intact one could get into the structure via a hole in the roof.As can be seen from the photos headroom would be rather restricted unless the floor had been lowered.I seem to recall having to crawl to get around inside(could be wrong though).As i mentioned earlier would a hole have been drilled down to the tunnels below for the purpose of bringing cables up to the structure?I have this memory of a fairly large bore metal pipe sticking out of the ground up on Long Hill,but again i could be confusing it with other sites visited.Strongly built to resist bombs and shells i'm intrigued as to what equipment it would have presumably contained.

seafordpete

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2010, 14:35:33 »
Forward was one of 3 the other being Fort Southwick Portsmouth and Dover (never seen anything more exact than Dover) . Role was to intercept German traffic, handle radar for the area (Forward ran from Selsea to Winchelsea so Dover picked up Eastwards of Winchelsea) Radar sites updated the plots every 15 mins. They also ran Coastal Artillery plots and control , air sea Rescue and the normal radio  traffic for the Sub Command as well as decoy lighting . LongHill plan shows 2 horizontal tunnels  and forward had 5 but was also the sub command rather than just radio which occupied about the same as Longhill

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2010, 10:38:06 »
Had a look on a couple of sites by typing in "HMS Forward" and i can see the building similarities seafordpete.It must have been a much larger tunnel system than Long Hill though.We'll see if anyone has any info on masts etc.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2010, 10:22:16 »
Thanks for the info seafordpete.If you're not familiar with the Dover area Long Hill rises up above the Dover to Deal railway line,with the old Roman Road to Richborough in a valley on one side and Buckland Estate in a valley on the other side.This ridge is still used today for a TV transmitter called strangely enough the Long Hill transmitter.Sorry if you already know this info but i'm going on your KHF name.It would be interesting to know who they were transmitting /listening to.Presumably they could listen into some transmissions coming from occupied Northern France if required. I'll have to look up the HMS Forward that you mention.

seafordpete

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2010, 09:26:15 »
If it was a similar set up to HMS Forward the receiver aerials were close by, fairly simple affairs of a wooden pole with a mast on and the transmission were about 2 miles away on the cliff tops west of the fort connected by landline but gaining the advantage of the cliff height

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2010, 22:11:19 »
unfairytale, I might have missed some of the information on these posts, but what was the brick built and concrete roofed structure on top of Long Hill for? Did a pipe or similar go down to the tunnels below? As it was a radio station I wonder where its aerials were situated. Somewhere on KHF i saw a photo of a WW2 wooden mast laying on it's side in the Great Lines area and was something like that once on Long Hill?

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2010, 10:15:00 »
Towerwill. I first went in the tunnel in the mid '70s and the secondary entrance was blocked by then. The Sub was caved in by then although not as much as my above picture, the square hole in the roof was still intact. The burnt out remains of the pavilion were still standing at the end of the hockey pitch.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline TowerWill

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2010, 09:46:57 »
unfairytale, am I right in thinking that a cave in a bit further up the hill provided an unofficial entrance into the main tunnel? I remember the "submarine" when it was intact. It looks like the late Mr.Bill Ferguson took his Caterpillar tractor over there and did a bit of demolition work. When I worked for the Fergusons they got rather annoyed with children playing on their land (I used to as well in my younger days).
The AA battery was still uncovered in the late 1960s but they probably bulldozed earth over the site to keep the kids away.

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2010, 21:10:25 »
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

DoverDan

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Long Hill, Dover. WWII Underground Radio Station
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2009, 21:58:09 »
Lol those tunnels have seen some action. I remember at school hearing tales of people letting of fireworks down there or lighting fires.
It amazes me that they didn`t cave in. A testament to the tunnellers who built them I suppose. I may be picturing the secondary entrance with the cratering behind, either that or I`m going mad. lol.

 

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