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Author Topic: Canterbury Blitz, 1942  (Read 104589 times)

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Offline CAT

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #254 on: November 25, 2016, 14:33:42 »
Having had a look at the 1946 aerial images of the site of the later Richborough power station, it is shown as abandoned railway sidings associated with the earlier Port Richborough.   

Offline Roger Stone

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #253 on: November 25, 2016, 12:08:05 »
Thanks again Nemo. First, back to the best way in/out of Canterbury (Your Reply #101 or 102, depending on which way the posts are shown on your computer):

According to the ‘Gospel by PC’, come in just south of easily recognised Richborough Power Station and take a compass heading slightly south of due west, allowing for the wind. Canterbury is close enough to the Continent for the Germans to estimate what that is, but even a fully sideways error of 3mph (20% of a Moderate Breeze) will put us only 220 yards north or south of our intended track after 15 miles at 360mph – about the difference between arriving over Sturry or Fordwich.

Was there any sort of power station at Richborough in 1942?  Certainly not the cooling-towers we remember; they were constructed in 1958-1962.

Offline CAT

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #252 on: January 18, 2016, 08:48:43 »
I can confidently say that no evidence of bomb damage was found across the site of St Gregory's Prior during its excavation, though whether incendiaries were responsible for the clearance is another matter? The prior was of course dissolved by Henry VIII and the remains slowly incorporated into the growing Northgate suburb. However, parts of the priors lodging house was still standing incorporated into later building up until the mid nineteenth-century. 

Offline Nemo

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #251 on: January 17, 2016, 17:36:55 »
Try the link at reply 24 of the Canterbury 11th October 1940 thread - although the bomb sites are more 'big blob' than ' x marks the spot'!

However, http://www.machadoink.com/St%20Gregorys%20Priory.htm suggests it was more vandal than hun?

Offline Maid of Kent

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #250 on: January 17, 2016, 17:28:59 »
Though this is slightly off course. I have just re-waded through this link in the hopes of finding a map showing where bombs fell or more aerial photos of the damage to Canterbury so that I could ascertain whether St Gregory (ex) Priory (or where it stood) in Northgate Street (opposite St Johns Hospital) was hit. Lanfranc House stands on the site now stands ? Is there such a map or other photos. I see from those at the beginning of this thread the Northgate Street suffered very considerable damage. Answers appreciated.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #249 on: July 04, 2015, 10:42:21 »
Way back at Reply#25 Royston2000 enquired about the death of his father in Howe Barracks on 31st October/1st November 1942, whom he described as Private H.J Ware.

Interestingly he is listed on the memorial as Lance Corporal Ware of the Buffs and the others as Privates of General Service Corps. The latter was the ‘regiment’ to which all recruits were posted for their initial 6 weeks training before being allocated to the infantry, artillery, engineers, etc. Hence it seems that Howe Barracks was a training centre and did not then house an ‘operational’ unit.

Royston2000’s father was evidently on the Permanent Staff, manned by the Buffs, and may have been an instructor holding Acting Lance Corporal rank to give him authority over the recruits.
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Offline Nemo

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #248 on: June 24, 2015, 08:50:17 »
I have been asked by IWM to credit their fieldworker WJ Rowe with the photograph of the "1942" memorial as it was at Howe Barracks in 2004 - and am pleased to oblige!  IWM plans to publish memorial images on its website in the future and their general policy is that these images can be used for non-commercial purposes with appropriate attribution.  I understand from the fieldworker based in West Kent that the IWM War Memorial Archive (ex-National Inventory of War Memorials) is overhauling the database, correcting existing archive records and documenting previously unrecorded memorials.  She has corrected the map references for the various memorials at HB but these have yet to work through the system.  The location there of the 1942 memorial garden was TR 16468 57946.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #247 on: June 22, 2015, 15:21:07 »
Thanks :)
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Offline Nemo

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #246 on: June 22, 2015, 15:05:35 »
The plaque does not distinguish between the late afternoon and following night raids - see enlargement below.  The linked photograph, taken during the re-dedication ceremony is also below; the refurbished memorial appears in the background.  Leros Barracks is on the Sturry Road.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #245 on: June 22, 2015, 14:50:43 »
For some reason I am denied access to the link.

Does it distinguish between casualties on the afternoon of 31st October or early morning of 1st November?

I thought Howe Barracks was the home of PWRR. Where is Leros Barracks, please?
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Offline Nemo

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #244 on: June 22, 2015, 13:29:42 »
Thanks are due to the IWM War Memorial Archive for locating and supplying the following picture of the memorial to the servicemen who were killed as a result of the enemy bombing raids on Howe Barracks in 1942.  As may be seen, the attacks of 31st October and 1st November claimed the lives of L/Cpl Ware and Ptes Burnett, Dyne, Haynes, Murphy and Rogers.

The memorial was originally in a garden within Howe Barracks but, along with others, now resides at Leros Barracks, Canterbury – home to 3 Btn PWRR.  I believe that they were re-dedicated there by Canon Paul Kerr of Rochester Cathedral on 3 May 2015.
http://www.1queens.co.uk/photos/queens-photos/Memorial-Re-Dedication/res/DSCF3972.jpg

Offline peterchall

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #243 on: June 09, 2015, 21:03:32 »
My pleasure, but what have I cleared up?
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Offline otis

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #242 on: June 09, 2015, 20:15:05 »
Thanks for clearing that up finally  then.  :)

I think my post on the other thread explains my sudden re-interest in those balloons.
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

Offline peterchall

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #241 on: June 09, 2015, 17:51:56 »
Perhaps it would help if you came to the point and said what it is I’m being evasive about. And can we be clear that, in response to your request for a map of Canterbury’s balloon sites, I told you of the existence of the link on the forum – I didn’t ask you to post it again.

There is a history with Sussex History Forum, to give it its registered name, too complex to go into here. I am a member but it treats me as a guest, and the list of balloon sites is ‘guest viewable’. Today it is asking me to log-in and then tells me my username does not exist, and it seems that I’m not the only one having problems. Perhaps in a couple of days I/we will be able to access it  again.

Being wise to the situation I copied the list of balloon sites while the going was good, and we have the document showing balloon raising times and heights on that day. Some way back I described the Double Parachute Link and asked how close-hauled balloons would work if fitted with it.

So what exactly do you want to know?
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Offline otis

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Re: Canterbury Blitz, 1942
« Reply #240 on: June 09, 2015, 15:49:29 »
But no, I have no more information relating to this thread at the moment, but I did check to see if the link you posted was the one I meant.

I have no idea why you are being evasive on this ?

In case anyone else is also lost, the Canterbury balloons are relevant to our topic here, because they are mentioned several times by eye-witnesses to the raid. They are also the reason given for several German pilots to spoiled their aim in bomb dropping.

That link I posted to KSH forum, in my reply to Peterchall's request is no longer available to non-members of that forum. I see the other thread ( Canterbury raid) , which was the source of the 11 Group report is also closed off to non-members there.

It seems that there is unintentional offence cause to that other forum. I think we were careful to give them credit for the information that was copied from them. It is such a shame to have lost access to that important balloon information, just at the point where we needed it. If anyone, who is a member of both forums, can shed light on this slight to them, we would be grateful.
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

 

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