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Author Topic: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover  (Read 40114 times)

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omega4040

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #44 on: May 24, 2011, 14:51:38 »

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!


An underground 'lake' is a bit of a misnomer. The whole of Kent is underlain by the chalk aquifer, and deeper still the waters hosted within the greensand. The depths vary, but in effect the whole of Kent, indeed most of the south-east of England is underlain by a 'lake.'

I am a geologist and have had to research the former Kent mines a great deal for my job. I think a tracer chemical originating in Kent and ending up in Germany is pretty unlikely. I have spoken to many ex-miners in the area and often they will tell you the mines ran out under the sea. This was in fact not the case - I have a map from the Coal Authority which shows the former working areas and the closest was Betteshanger which worked an area just south of Redhouse Wall Farm.



Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #43 on: March 22, 2011, 09:51:44 »
My partner's brother has a rather amusing story of the days when rail lines went down on the slag heap.They were gone by time i worked on the railways.Apparently this chap who took bets for colliery workers was running a guard's brake van down the line when the braking gear fell off.As he careered past desperately winding the useless brake wheel,other workers were shouting out the bets they wanted placed to him.Eventually in the distance there was a great cloud of dust and a loud crash when he hit the buffers.Fortunately no injuries though.When i worked trains out there often my brake van would end up under a conveyor belt from which coal lumps would drop.No hard hats or safety boots for us guards back then.

ColinDealer1

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #42 on: March 21, 2011, 14:52:53 »

I am researching into the old Tilmanstone Colliery and have heard quite a few comments made about these underground water reservoirs and lakes and is certainly worth a new subject thread. It was very interesting also hearing your comment on this matter Andyb. If you do create another thread for it then please let me know and place the subject title on here so I can find it.

Offline Andyb

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2011, 20:58:09 »

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!


My now late father also told me about this underground water supply as one of his responsibilities at Charrington's Brewery in Walmer, Deal, as a Plant engineer, was to check the flow rate of the brewery well. I can't remember the figures but the level in the bore hole was measured before and during the pump being turned on and the level would hardly change indicating a massive water supply. The well was sealed when housing was built on the site.
I too would like to know more about this underground stream, maybe i need to start another thread.

Metiri est cognoscere

ColinDealer1

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2011, 17:54:06 »

The Tilmanstone Colliery slag heap is still near the old colliery site, but has been dug out quite abit and I've heard was apparently used to add to making tarmac for road surfaces. You can get to the slag heap, through an alley way midway along the left side of Pike Road at the industrial estate.

Further to an earlier comment made about the red water having been seen at the old Tilmanstone Colliery site, it was iron ore deposits that found its way into the water beneath that whole area of the east coast of Kent. One of the former colliery owners, Richard Tilden Smith, did want to develop this area of Kent to also extract large sources of iron ore, along with cement works and other factories, which would have all been transported abroad using the old aerial ropeway. I have recently been informed by a former Tilmanstone Colliery Deputy, that the water that was pumped out of the shafts was in fact held in a massive reservoir on the site of the colliery and at one time had been allowed to then drain into the local water system, until the National Water Board finally identified it may cause a problem with the local water supplies. At one time the colliery was discharging more than 1000 gallons of water per day into the reservoir, which can actually been seen from one of the aerial photos added on page 3, situated adjacent to Pike Road.

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!







Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2011, 10:09:39 »
An old school friend was a keen collector of fossils and i can remember we went on trips to the Betteshanger spoil heap getting to it via Northwall Road in Deal.We never visited the Tilmo spoil heap though.It probably was harder to get to.

ColinDealer1

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #38 on: March 05, 2011, 23:56:22 »
Tilmsnstone was a very wet mine to work, possibly more so than all the other collieries in Kent. To prevent water from cascading down the shafts pumping engines were installed at various levels at Tilmanstone, to bring it to the surface. It would then be pumped into channels apparently alongside the Sandwich Road and eventually released into the nearby water course. The water would come to the surface boiling hot and would appear as a red coloured water, which contained iron oxide. My father who worked as a face-worker for many years also remembers other sources of water that were apparently ice cold and thought to belong to underground waterways. I have seen fossils from old miners who worked at Tilmanstone found even at those depths underground. I recall my father mentioning about them having do 'packing' of overhead holes in the ceilings of the mine, that were apparently huge fossilised remains of huge trees. I have quite a few stories that it was a completely different World down there!

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #37 on: February 27, 2011, 16:26:16 »
The orange coloured water apparently was pumped out from the pit.I've been told it contained ochre from natural mineral deposits.When their father worked in the lab at the pit an attempt was made to see if water pumped from Tilmo was seeping back in again.To do this they added some sort of chemical dye to the water being pumped out but no trace was found of it coming back into the pit.

Offline ellenkate

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #36 on: February 27, 2011, 09:26:12 »

I believe there is a lot of underground water in the Tilmanstone area, and some aquafors (not sure about spelling this), also which go into the water supply. 
Obviously there was a lot of seepage into the colliery workings which had to be pumped out all the time.

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PG

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #35 on: February 26, 2011, 19:58:51 »
I can remember one day in the early 80's when some local lads took it upon themselves to block that ditch and water flooded right over Pike Road several inches deep. That was about halfway between the pit and Beeches farm. I can remember wondering then where the water was from.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #34 on: February 26, 2011, 17:16:38 »
That's right ellenkate i used to see the orange water in the late '70's flowing in a ditch.I didn't notice anything similar down near the pit when i was shunting wagons etc.I haven't asked her brother about it yet.I thought the pipe might still be there Roob Itself.

Offline ellenkate

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2011, 11:44:05 »

TowerWill:

Yes, there was orange-coloured water, I have seen it in the 1970s,  think it was near the junction of Pike Road and School Lane, Tilm.

Ellenkate

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Roob Itself

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2011, 10:24:25 »
yeah i believe that pipe does exsist between sandwich bay and sandown. I had seen it couple of years back and wondered about it.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2011, 09:36:05 »
Doesn't the end of the pipe appear now and then from the shingle beach between Sandown and Sandwich Bay?I've seen it mentioned somewhere.Another thing i used to notice in my cycling days was orange coloured water running down the ditch next to Pike Road(think that's the name).I'll ask my partner's brother again about it as their dad worked at the brickette plant at Tilmo.

overman

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2011, 21:14:46 »
As far as I know the line is still in position but not used.
During the latter end of the life of the pits it was managed and serviced by Southern Water

 

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