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Author Topic: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover  (Read 40003 times)

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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2010, 12:58:47 »
Tilmanstone in the 1950s with the gantry of the aerial ropeway crossing Pike road.


As far as I know Towerwill all the shafts were capped and not filled, Tilmanstone was very wet, and deep, That's why the nearby pub is called the High and Dry.
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Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2010, 21:43:56 »
Can't remember if it's been discussed already unfairytale but were the Tilmanstone shafts infilled or just capped as i believe those at Coldred were?Something to do with not polluting the water table i think.

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2010, 18:36:25 »
The preliminary sinking of the shafts at Tilmanstone began in the 1840s. Arthur Burr and Tilden Smith were the two mainly involved. Tilden Smith was the eventual owner and it was he who bought the land at Elvington, where the  housing for the miners was built, the miners themselves formed the Dwelling Syndicate and later built over 200 homes, this was around 1910. It was also Tilden Smith who thought-up the Aerial Ropeway scheme.
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Offline Islesy

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2010, 18:38:40 »
And how it is now:







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Offline Islesy

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2010, 18:32:53 »
Sadly, the 'divide station' and power station for the aerial ropeway at East Langdon are the last remains of colliery buildings at Tilmanstone. The aerial ropeway was built by Dorman Long to break the stranglehold that the East Kent Light Railway had on coal transport from Tilmanstone, and was opened between Tilmanstone Colliery and East Langdon on 12th October 1929 and the first vessel was loaded at Dover Harbour on 14th February 1930. Exports of coal through Dover didn't come up to expectations and the ropeway was little used after 1935. During the war the structure fell as there was no export trade and by the end of the war it was beyond economic repair and was dismantled in 1954 and sold for scrap.

As it was circa 1930.



Approaching Dover Harbour and the exit from the cliffs



And crossing the Dover - Deal railway.





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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2010, 12:27:00 »
Tilmanstone Male Voice Choir, led by Stan Stone with his accordion.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2010, 12:13:10 »
1984 During the Miners strike.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2009, 20:07:45 »
In the late 1970's i was a freight train guard working trains from Shepherdswell to Tilmanstone Colliery on what remained of the East Kent Light Railway.We refered to it as "going out the Klondike".After collecting the required amount of empty wagons from the Long sidings at Shepherdswell it was off around the corner and down to Timanstone.There were no signals, but the "staff" gave us permission to travel on the line.This "staff" was just a bit of wood with a metal label,to be collected from and returned to Shepherdswell signal box.

The train formation going to the pit was usually loco,brakevan and empty wagons.After a careful crossing of the first road ,the driver would take us at bicycle speed through Golgotha tunnel and down to the Eythorne road crossing.If all clear it was across and down to the run-round near the colliery.I would climb down at the top end and when the train was clear of the points wave the red light or give hand signals.The secondman uncoupled the loco and changed the points after the driver had pulled forward.Then back it came,over my set of points which i then changed and forward onto the wagons which i then coupled to the loco.Grabbing the tail lamp i would stand on the loco step as we pushed forward.We would get the OK to proceed from the colliery weighbridge where each wagon was weighed empty and checked for any rubbish in it(nuisance if there was).I would sit in my brake van while the wagons were loaded from the bay with coal by a large tyred vehicle with a bucket at the front.When loaded ,weighed and labeled ,it was back to Shepherdswell.This time my brakevan was at the rear with tail lamp showing.More shunting at Shepherdswell then back to Tilmanstone with the next trip.  

Philio81

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2009, 20:59:41 »
Heres what remains of colliery that ive found. Not sure what else there is still about






Roob Itself

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2009, 23:13:03 »
Heres the location i found.


Roob Itself

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2009, 22:54:47 »
Ok found a good site with photos of the winding shed.

http://flickr.com/photos/weddingsinkent/sets/72157609014365278/

Roob Itself

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2009, 21:43:08 »
Ok Looking into the ariel ropeway. Supposidly the only surviving accessable thing is the engine room that used to drive it whihc is situated half way between the cliffs and tilmanstone colliery.

www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/stations/s/staple/index.shtml

Its at the bottom of the page but im looking into it now.

Philio81

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2008, 13:47:57 »
The company i work for is built on the grounds of the old colliery. All the tracks for the carts are still in place an can be seen all round the outside of the buildings and the remains of one of the buildings for the ariel ropeway system that took the coal to the docks is still around. Heres a link to some photos of it http://flickr.com/photos/weddingsinkent/sets/72157609014365278/. And this is quite a good site with info about the colliery http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/t/tilmanstone_colliery/index1.shtml

Maidstone Trooper

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Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2008, 15:43:57 »
Intresting link here with reference to Tilmanstone Coillery, and the Aerial Ropeway.

http://www.dover.gov.uk/kentcoal/exhibition/tilmanstone.asp

 

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