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Author Topic: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover  (Read 31773 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #58 on: February 05, 2017, 17:22:48 »
Dover Express - Friday 01 January 1937

Fatal Accident at Tilmanstone Colliery.

A fifteen years old haulage boy, Arthur William Moore, was fatally injured during the morning shift at Tilmanstone Colliery on Thursday. He was employed underground in No. 220's district, and was crushed by the moving tubs which bring coal from where it is cut to the bottom of the shaft. Moore was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. W. Moore, of "Hoyland" Ashley. All men ceased work, as is usual in the case of a fatality.

Grave found at All Saints, Waldershare.

Offline Alastair

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #57 on: November 24, 2014, 14:42:56 »
Nice photo, John. As you say, it looks to be fairly late on by the car approaching.

Alastair

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #56 on: November 24, 2014, 00:43:42 »
I've just found this photo of Tilmanstone Colliery taken by my late Father in Law,   Allan J Yates.  He took up photography in his retirement years during the 80s.   It looks like it was taken during the first stages of decommissioning  as I can't see any ropes attached etc.

Such a shame those pitheads weren't saved like the one in Wales - would have made a brilliant museum.

I though it would be nice to share.

JW

Offline Andyb

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #55 on: March 01, 2014, 08:47:39 »
Found an interesting short Pathe Clip of Tilmanston Colliery Ropeway

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=6064.0

Andy
Metiri est cognoscere

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #54 on: March 17, 2013, 11:56:03 »
Mary's brother has told me that there is an exhibition today (Sun. 17/03/2013) at the Welfare Hall, Elvington in connection with the Colliery.
I believe the EKLR is running too.

overwallop

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #53 on: March 17, 2013, 09:52:26 »
Radio Kent gave a mention of this mine this morning.  I missed the actual content of the item but I thought I heard something about 100 year celebration and that maybe something is happening there today? 

Offline DS239

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #52 on: October 27, 2012, 20:59:31 »
A couple of images from the 'web..

A fairly common image, it shows the loco EKR no.1, the Fox,Walker 0-6-0ST in 1914.


This one shows three of the seemingly photographically elusive 'Tilmanstone' private owner coal wagons on the left.

ribblehead

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #51 on: October 10, 2012, 01:18:12 »
Hi Folks,

Few photos attached on Tilmanston Colliery Ropeway, would have dearly loved to have viewed all of this in operational days, quite a sight and most interesting.

Ribblehead

Offline kyn

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #50 on: November 25, 2011, 10:51:12 »
On the 14th January 1909 the hoppit at Tilmanstone Colliery was being raised at No.1 pit when the steam was cut out too early and an over-wind occurred, this resulted in the pulley wheel breaking sending the hoppit back down into the pit.  Unfortunately the men were working in the shaft at the bottom and the hoppit, which was loaded up and weighing about 3 tons, landed within the men, killing three of them.  The three men were R. Smesson, James Hambrook and Harry Arnold.  Officials rushed down into the pit within a few minutes and brought up the bodies of the three men, surprisingly the bodies showed no signs of injury.  The directors released a statement deploring the accident but they said in all other respects it was not a serious accident and no serious damage had been sustained to the shaft and fittings, work would begin again within 48 hours.

At the time the colliery was being sunk by Kent Coal Concessions Limited.  Two shafts were being sunk, the No.1 shaft, where the accident occurred, which is down to 922 feet, and Gabrielle Pit, which is sunk to a depth of 761 feet.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #49 on: September 07, 2011, 23:16:39 »
I was shown the death certificate recently of a poor chap who fell through a hole in scaffolding and plunged down the shaft at Tilmanstone Colliery.Death was by drowning and i believe the year was 1920 but i'm not sure about that.My partner's gran used to rent out a room at Eythorne for the registrar there to use.I understand the victim was a relative of my partner's family.It seems the registrar for that district had a garage business in the village in those days.

erfman

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #48 on: May 27, 2011, 23:44:22 »
this thread brings back some memories for me, back in 1973/74 i used to haul bulk loads of coal from tilmanstone to chapeltown, sheffield, to a coking plant if my memory serves me. :) erfman

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #47 on: May 27, 2011, 17:49:35 »
Gosh Roders i'm glad i just shunted coal wagons up top!I think my Mary's father worked on the Kent Fire process.Once during my short time as a coal delivery driver i dropped off a ton of the wrong stuff at one address.It was the stuff shaped something like a walnut.The home owner was not too pleased with me!

Roders

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #46 on: May 27, 2011, 12:59:19 »
I went down Tilmanstone in the mid 60's with a group of lads. We had all just started in the coal industry and the coal board arranged a 'tour'!
The experience will stay with me forever!
The drop to bottom in the cage (the speed of descent and it seemed it was raining as we dropped)
I remember being told we were 3032 feet down...
We were shown some old workings where huge steel beams had been twisted like paper
The temperature was unbearable off the main 'corridors' - it was hot generally and in places very breezy..with hot wind being circulated
The dust!!!
The walk to the coal face - it was a long way and uphill
The face itself! loads of jacks holding up the roof - impossible to stand up - the noise of machinery
Then some blasting!! - i remember seeing what was solid rock appear to ripple (one lad was so scared he froze solid and was carried away and back to the top)
The MINERS - what great bunch of men - how they worked down there was beyond me and some of them were wearing just boots, shorts, belt, and helmet
We went back up and saw how 'Kent Fire' was made which was a sort of processed coal brick and then had a shower
It took another couple of bath days to get clean i reckon - my mother said it looked like i was wearing eye liner .....
I had borrowed some Tuff Big T boots from a friend (i thought my football boots wouldn't look right and i had no other suitable footwear) new they were a sort of sand colour - my mate was not best pleased when i gave them back!
Heath & Safety blah!!

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #45 on: May 26, 2011, 08:44:20 »
Thanks for that interesting information omega4040!My old school friend was also aiming to be a geologist and i can recall how important his A level results were to him back in 1968.We lost touch after that.Your details of the water under Kent shows how wet these mines were.I suppose it also explains how in wet years the water used to jet out of the brickwork in Abbotscliffe railway tunnel and the Nailbourne streams flowed again.

omega4040

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Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
« Reply #44 on: May 24, 2011, 14:51:38 »

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!


An underground 'lake' is a bit of a misnomer. The whole of Kent is underlain by the chalk aquifer, and deeper still the waters hosted within the greensand. The depths vary, but in effect the whole of Kent, indeed most of the south-east of England is underlain by a 'lake.'

I am a geologist and have had to research the former Kent mines a great deal for my job. I think a tracer chemical originating in Kent and ending up in Germany is pretty unlikely. I have spoken to many ex-miners in the area and often they will tell you the mines ran out under the sea. This was in fact not the case - I have a map from the Coal Authority which shows the former working areas and the closest was Betteshanger which worked an area just south of Redhouse Wall Farm.



 

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