News: In 1834 a 13 metre long Iguanadon fossil was found in Queen’s Road in Maidstone
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton  (Read 4863 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Gromit

  • Guest
Re: St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2010, 20:52:46 »
Some nice pics Merc...my local and family church for many years,
 I was christened and married there..as were three generations befor me.

oldsunset

  • Guest
Re: St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2010, 10:34:50 »
Nice old watercolour here of church dated 1805 calling it "cuckstone"....i like it spelt this way it sounds more ancient than cuxton

http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/kinggeorge/c/003ktop00000018u015a0002.html

Paul Narramore

  • Guest
Re: St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2010, 23:54:20 »
Not an easy church to find and easily missed when travelling along the main road. In my quest a couple of years ago to photograph the headstones of all the local Commonwealth War Graves Commisssion headstones, I at last visited the churchyard on the steep hillside. I guess most of you are familiar with FindaGrave.com but many of the local CWGC headstones are on there.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7429
  • Appreciation 422
    • Sheppey History
Re: St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2010, 23:52:52 »
Good info, thanks Merc  :)

merc

  • Guest
Re: St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2010, 21:30:22 »
People have been living in the Cuxton area for thousands of years. Large numbers of flint tools from the Stone Age have been found in the Rectory grounds. The name 'Cuxton' is thought to derive from 'Cucola', a Saxon. The Cucola Stone was a mark, or boundary stone at the intersection of two ancient trackways nearby. There was probably a pre-christian shrine at the site. The church is dedicated to St. Michael and All Angels, a common name for churches built on hills or at mark stones.

It's well known that the church does not face due East, but unusually more to the South. One explanation is that there was already sacred buildings on the site when the church was laid out, another is that on St. Michael's Day (September 29) the sun rises from the south and the church orientation reflects this. The oldest parts of the church are the remains of the Norman church, which would have been a small Nave and a short Chancel. Much of todays church is from the 1860's restoration. The present font is Victorian, pieces from the mediaeval one used to be half buried in the churchyard, but were moved inside to better preserve them. To the left of the entrance door are the remains of a Stoup, where parishioners washed in holy water as they entered the church. The tower was built in the fifteenth century, but extensive repairs were carried out to it in 1964.

merc

  • Guest
St. Michael and All Angels, Cuxton
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2010, 20:54:14 »
"If you would see a church miswent, then you must go to Cuxton in Kent."











 />











 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines