News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Sir Jeffrey Amherst  (Read 4316 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1400
  • Appreciation 218
Re: Sir Jeffrey Amherst
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2017, 21:21:22 »
Here's three of merc's photos, unfortunately smaller than the originals.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1400
  • Appreciation 218
Re: Sir Jeffrey Amherst
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2016, 18:01:34 »
Jeffrey Amherst and Smallpox Blankets
Lord Jeffrey Amherst's letters discussing germ warfare against American Indians.
Article by Peter d'Errico.
http://www.nativeweb.org/pages/legal/amherst/lord_jeff.html
Mirror link if above site goes down @ http://www.umass.edu/legal/derrico/amherst/lord_jeff.html

Below from Wikipedia

One of the most infamous and well documented issues during Pontiac's War was the use of biological warfare against the Native Americans. The suggestion was posed by Amherst himself in letters to Colonel Henry Bouquet. Amherst, having learned that smallpox had broken out among the garrison at Fort Pitt, and after learning of the loss of his forts at Venago, Le Boeuf and Presqu'Isle, wrote to Colonel Bouquet:

Could it not be contrived to send the small pox among the disaffected tribes of Indians? We must on this occasion use every stratagem in our power to reduce them.

Bouquet, who was already marching to relieve Fort Pitt, agreed with this suggestion in a postscript when he responded to Amherst just days later on 13 July 1763.

P.S. I will try to inoculate [sic] the Indians by means of Blankets that may fall into their hands, taking care however not to get the disease myself. It is a pity to oppose good men against them, I wish we could make use of the Spaniard's Method, and hunt them with English Dogs. Supported by Rangers, and some Light Horse, who would I think effectively extirpate or remove that Vermine.

In response, also in a postscript, Amherst replied:

P.S. You will do well to try to inoculate [sic] the Indians by means of Blankets, as well as to try Every other method that can serve to Extirpate this Execrable Race. I should be very glad your Scheme for Hunting them Down by Dogs could take Effect, but England is at too great a Distance to think of that at present.

Historians Elizabeth Fenn and Benedict Kiernan have shown,"Fort Pitt had anticipated these orders. Reporting on parleys with Dalaware chiefs on June 24, a trader [William Trent] wrote: '[We] gave them two Blankets and an Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect.' The military hospital records confirm that two blankets and handkerchiefs were 'taken from people in the Hospital to Convey the Smallpox to the Indians.' The fort commander paid for these items, which he certified 'were had for the uses above mentioned.' Historian Elizabeth Fenn has documented 'the eruption of epidemic smallpox' among Delaware and Shawnee Indians nearby, about the time the blankets were distributed."


seafordpete

  • Guest
Re: Sir Jeffrey Amherst
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2010, 20:26:37 »
Apparently he bought the woods around Seal as they reminded him of Canada. The pub, variously Crown Point Inn or Sir Jeffrey Amherst, was a hunting lodge he had built. In the 1960s it still was a cosy little place with antlers and deerskins draped over the stools. Then Whitbread bought it..................................

merc

  • Guest
Re: Sir Jeffrey Amherst
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2010, 14:08:29 »
The Jeffrey Amherst Monument in St. Nicholas Church, Sevenoaks.


Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Sir Jeffrey Amherst
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2010, 22:44:04 »
Merc, you are a treasure!  You always pick really interesting things to hunt out  :)

merc

  • Guest
Sir Jeffrey Amherst
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2010, 21:06:06 »
Jeffrey Amherst was born in Riverhead, Sevenoaks, on January 29, 1717. By the time he was 14 years old, his military career had already begun. He is most famous for his actions in the French and Indian War, as he helped lead the British to crucial victories at Louisbourg, Quebec City, and Montreal, in his campaign on the St. Lawrence River in New France. The latter two victories essentially sealed the fate of the French in North America, and brought an end the war. After the Siege of Montreal, Amherst was knighted and named military governor of Canada, a positioned he held until 1763. Returning to England, he lived at a house he called Montreal, in Riverhead, not far from where he had lived as a boy. He served as Commander in Chief of the British army from 1772 - 95. He was created a baron in 1776 and a field marshal in 1796. Jeffrey died in 1797 and was buried at St. Nicholas Churchyard, Sevenoaks.

His house at Montreal Park no longer exists, and much of the land where the Amherst Estate was has been built on with housing. However, an obelisk erected by him still stands on a hill in one of the gardens.












 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines