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Author Topic: Dockyard Air Raid  (Read 13962 times)

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Offline Maid of Kent

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2014, 22:26:18 »
I was living in the area between Aug 1940-Oct 1943 down at East Court and I am wondering whether that 3rd Dec 1940 is the raid I remember although I was only 4 at the time, it may have been a later one. We hadn`t gone out to the shelter at that point. Incendiary bombs were dropped in the vincinity, some in the orchard and at least one onto to the farm roof which my Mother, Uncle and Aunt managed to put out - the fire brigade was too busy elsewhere. When it was out we all went out into the orchard to the shelter and I remember the 'bonfires' and seeing the sky towards Chatham glowing with fire, presumably the dockyard and all those houses that were destroyed on the hill above the yard completely devastated. For some considerable time the buses that went through that area were re routed. It remained a bomb site until some time after the war, if my memory is correct.

Sheppeymiss

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2012, 13:11:18 »
Thank you peterchall, Leofwine and HERB Collecter for your replies, very kind.

I'll sent about getting Edward Crispe's death certificate.

Sheppeymiss 

Offline peterchall

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2012, 23:25:09 »
I wonder if a town's records show only casualties or damage in its 'municipal' area, if there is such an entity. For example, Rochester City Archives for 15th August 1940 show only "High Explosives, Rochester. 5 houses demolished, others damaged. Casualties - 9 injured". No mention of the damage and casualties at the airport. So would Chatham Council records show incidents in the Dockyard, or other government property such as barracks?
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2012, 22:57:26 »
The photo of damage at the compressor house in the dockyard that numanfan posted certainly says it was caused by an air-raid in 1942, so either the info with the photo is wrong, or perhaps Mr. Crispe was injured in a raid earlier in the year and later died of his wounds? (Or maybe there was a delay in registering his death following the raid?)  I think obtaining a copy of the death certificate would be a help in this case.
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2012, 22:20:27 »
........ looking for some information about an air raid on Chatham dockyard in 1942. My maternal Grandfather, Edward Crispe, was a dockyard worker there and died in an air raid. His death was registered in between October and December, so the air raid in question could have been from the end of September to December. He appears to have also been known as Edwin. Would anyone be able to point me in the right direction.
According to 'The Battle of the East Coast 1939-1945' by J P Foynes, which seems fairly complete, there were no air raids on Chatham in late 1942.
He does say "3-4 March 1943. More (bombs) exploded at no 1 basin Chatham Dockyard and killed 5-the only mid-war air raid deaths in the Medway towns."
Hometown Blues Syd Arthur

Sheppeymiss

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2012, 17:08:26 »
From the book "Chatham Naval Dockyard & Barracks" by David T. Hughes


Hi, I am brand new here on the forum. I came across this post whilst looking for some information about an air raid on Chatham dockyard in 1942. My maternal Grandfather, Edward Crispe, was a dockyard worker there and died in an air raid. His death was registered in between October and December, so the air raid in question could have been from the end of September to December. He appears to have also been known as Edwin. Would anyone be able to point me in the right direction.

Thanks
Sheppeymiss

Offline kyn

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2010, 20:50:37 »
Welcome to the forum TLR, I hope that the above posts have not upset you too much, we try to recognise all those who have died however it can be difficult sometimes when adding information about accidents, bombings, illness etc. that could upset family members.  I hope you find some interesting posts on the forum and look forward to anything you may be able to share with us.

TLR

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2010, 18:58:28 »
Hi BB

Re: Your post of 6th June

Wanted to let you know that one of the fatalities on the night of 3rd December 1940, at Chatham Docks, was my Great Grandfather - Albert Spencer Burfoot.

I felt such a pang when I read his name on your post, as I had simply googled him to see if anything would come up. Am visiting with my grandmother - his youngest daughter, this weekend and hope to find out some more family history. We have often been told the story of Albert - who was very musical apparently, who was, as I understand it, on some sort of nightwatch the night of 3rd Dec 1940. Apparently, on this watch,they used to take it in turns to make the cocoa. That night wasn't his turn, but he went to make it anyway. The bomb fell and tragically he was decapitated. My grandmother was only ten years old and she recalls how her own Mum wasn't allowed to see Albert's body.

I am hoping to take my three children to the Docks this weekend, and see where my poor great grandfather lost his life. Funny that we are so far removed in time and yet this is still an emotional issue.....

Offline kyn

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2010, 13:02:37 »
 :)

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2010, 11:38:54 »
That's exactly what I'm up to with this one! Slowly, slowly, catchee monkey!

Offline kyn

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2010, 08:30:38 »
bromptonboy, it would be really nice if the dockyard put a memorial plaque on the damaged area for those who lost their lives.

merc

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2010, 00:05:19 »
From "The Gillingham Chronicles"

William Edward Grant (47)   19.8.1940  of Albert Road, Gillingham

Frederick Sanderson New (16)   19.8.1940   of Waterside Lane, Gillingham

Alfred Alben Hedges (19)   3.12.1940   of Windsor Road, Gillingham

Andrew Alexander Sang (66)   3.12.1940   of King Edward Road, Gillingham

Bernard Victor Trannah (41)   3.12.1940   of St Mary's Road, Gillingham
 

Offline kyn

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2010, 23:02:57 »
Taken from the "day by day" account of Chatham Dockyard: http://campus.medway.ac.uk/library/about/files/daybyday/august.pdf

19 Aug. , 1940 , No1 Smithery hit by bombs during German air raid. Ref; Peri Sept.77 p8.

3rd December shows up as...

03 Dec. , 1940 , German bombers attacked the Yard, around 8pm; bombs hit rigging house, locomotive shop, and the factory, (8 killed and 63 injured). Ref; RDL.

I will have a search on The Times tomorrow for you  :)

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2010, 21:27:01 »
Been doing a bit more digging on the dockyard air raids. Details found in BofB reports and CWGC records as follows:-

19th August 1940 ~ Single aircraft attacked dockyard. Building wrecked by bombs. Five deaths:-
Frederick Amey - Killed.
William Edward Grant - Killed.
Frederick Sanderson New - Killed
George Alfred Hatt - Died of Wounds 20th Aug.
Archibald Rowland Barker - Died of Wounds, no date.

16.35hrs 18th September 1940 ~ Single aircraft attacked Chatham Dockyard. One building wrecked by bombs.

3rd December 1940 ~ Bombs dropped on Chatham Dockyard. Nine deaths:-
Andrew Alexander Sang - Killed.
Bernard Victor Tranah - Killed.
Robert Blakey - Killed.
Charles Norman - Killed.
Albert Spencer Burfoot - Killed.
Alfred Albert Alban OKA Hedges - Killed.
William Higgins - Killed.
Stanley Briggs - Died of Wounds 4th Dec.
John Robert Thomas Medhurst - Died of Wounds 4th Dec.

Kyn, are you certain that the Smithy damage occurred on 19th August 1940? If so it looks like we have the death roll for that incident! Any ideas on the 3rd December incident?

Offline kyn

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Re: Dockyard Air Raid
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2010, 14:31:43 »
A skilled labourer, G. V. Bonnett was given a Medal for Meritorious Service three days later, maybe this was a result of the bombing?

 

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