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Author Topic: Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?  (Read 2277 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2017, 19:48:25 »
Thanks mikeb I'll look into that one. It might be the original document refers to New Brompton, but a few times now I've seen an entry like that and it was the person cataloging it used the term 'New Brompton' to distinguish it from 'Old Gillingham' or 'Old Brompton'

I've been making a few maps from directory entries for New Brompton and Gillingham and it certainly looks as though before the 1850s what was later referred to as New Brompton was lumped in with Gillingham, but from the 1850s onwards New Brompton seems to be distinguished from Gillingham in the directories (though sometimes included as a sub-listing in the Brompton section.) In the second half of the 19th century New Brompton gradually pushes its way into the area covered by Gillingham in the earlier directories.
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Offline mikeb

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Re: Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2017, 11:15:26 »
I found this entry in the records for St. Marys ,Gillingham on Cityark showing a date of 1786. I have not seen the entire entry myself, but might be worth a further look?




Result number 151 - Please quote Reference: P153_GILLINGHAM_ST_MARY_MAGDALENE_1558_1986/P153_08_01_01 on request slip.
Path: Ecclesiastical_Rochester_Archdeaconry_Area_Parishes/ P153_GILLINGHAM_ST_MARY_MAGDALENE_1558_1986/ 08_Vestry_and_PCC/ 01_Minutes/ P153_08_01_01.html

Vestry Minutes: poor law administration, rate assessments, appointments of parish officers, audits of accounts; repairs to church roof 1763; purchase of workhouse, 1764; maintenance of lunatic at Bethlem 1769; parish indicted for bridle road between Slickets Hill and Chatham Mill 1770; fence removed for road widening 1772; permission to George Marsh (Naval Commissioner) to build vault in church 1777; mention of Britton Farm  1780; permission  for Mr Page to divert path from Gillingham Fort and Bridge to New Brompton across his fields Jackets Croft and Yackmans - much used by seaman on way to ships 1786; memorandum that footpath used at Hilly Field or Westfield (Batchelor’s Farm) to Church St. is used (by permission) instead of ancient path around the sides of the field, 1800; master of workhouse dismissed for indecent conduct 1801; £5 paid to James Mooney who is to work as a servant in Ireland for Lt. Thomson RN 1802; building for the sick to be erected at back of poor house, 1802

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2017, 23:30:28 »
I just noticed this in Baldwin's "Gillingham Chronicles", and whilst it doesn't  help find the earliest date the name New Brompton was used, it does show it was certainly not in widespread use by 1852.

The vicar of Upchurch recorded in his diary on 5 April 1852,

In walking through Gillingham I was much struck at the vast number of houses which have sprung up late on the Gillingham side of the Chatham Lines.  New streets have been laid out and blocks of houses have been erected since last summer which now form an almost continuous line of streets.  I do not know whar name is given to this mushroom town but I suppose it will be called New Brompton...
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2012, 18:54:06 »
Yes, but I',m not sure that it was classed as New Brompton at that date. Likewise the Black Lion moved from near modern Khyber Road/Prince Arthur Road junction to Fox Lane/Mill Road in 1789, but I don't have any reference to what these areas were classed as at this time. Nile cottage may have been the oldest building in New Brompton (ie the first in the area) rather than the first one to be called New Brompton, if that makes sense.  From other research it does look as though most of what we now call the Great Lines was known as Brompton Common before the defences were built, which could also help explain a settlement named New Bromton on the edge of it.
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Offline swiftone

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Re: Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2012, 18:39:10 »
Leofwine, you did mention in your locked thread that you had read somewhere that Nile Cottage (built 1722) located at the bottom of Mill Road, was the first house in New Brompton.

Offline Leofwine

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Earliest appearance of "New Brompton"?
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2012, 18:07:58 »
Since my previous attempt to find this out (http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=8924.0) got locked as the thread got too messy, veering off topic in several directions, I'm going to try again with a more specific post!

I am trying to find out when the area across the Lines from Brompton FIRST became known as New Brompton.  The earliest secure date I have for it is Col. Mudge's map of 1819 (below), so I am looking for definite references from dated sources that are earlier than that. (I'm being specific in the hopes kyn will let this one run!)

Col. Mudge's map of 1819


On this map the settlement is very small, but clearly developed, with buildings around what is now Mill Road and the Library end of the High Street (Fox Lane and either Brompton Road or Canterbury Road respectively, at the time of the map), so it had obviously been growing for some time by 1819.

In the Gillingham Chronicles Baldwin quotes a newspaper article from the 1840s in which the writer recalls his childhood in New Brompton:
New Brompton was a long town, legth but no breadth, stretcing from Park Terrace [Marlborough Road] to Steadman's Mill, including Park Place, Britton Street and Chatham Street. Eastwards from Britton Street there were cornfields as far as the eye could see... Children were warned not to wander [in Dark Lane, now Paget Street] for fear of being caught by gypsies. Dark Lane was flanked either side with tall elm trees. The East Kent Railway had not arrived and there was no Railway Street. Cottages were only on one side of the High Street from the Cricketers to Canterbury Street...
From other references to people at other points in the article mentioned above it seems likely the writer was talking about a period of about 1825-35, so it can be seen by comparison with the map that New Brompton was growing fairly quickly even this early, so it is not impossible that at the time of Mudge's map it really was very new, perhaps as a name only existing for a handful of years.

The 1756 plan of the Chatham Lines shows only a farm near what would become the High Street (this farm was known as Fullager's Farm a little later and stood about where the Co-operative/Somerfield supermarket is now), and a couple of buildings in Medway Road, but none are labelled as new Brompton.

The 1786 plan still shows only Fullager's farm in what would become the High Street, but now there are also a few houses shown in Fox Lane (Mill Road). There is nothing to indicate the place being called New Brompton at this date.

The 1790 and 1793 editions of the British Universal Directory have fairly large entries for Brompton. As a footnote to the Brompton entries the have a note saying "Within a mile of Brompton, is the village of Gillingham" followed by a brief description of Gillingham Church and Fort, Grange, Lidsing and Twydale (Twydall) but no directory for any of them, and then goes on to mention theat the Church Spire visible across the river opposite Gillingham is that of Hoo Church, and then "Two miles farther is the village of Rainham."  Given all this, it seems likely that if New Brompton was recognised as a separate settlement at this time, it would have been named.

Therefore, it would seem we have two dates to look for:-

1) The birth of the settlement east of the Lines which appears to have started in the Mill Road area in the about the third quarter of the 18th century.

2) The first use of the name "New Brompton" which would appear to take place sometime between about 1793 and 1819.

If you have any information to help narrow down this date, please let me know.

(And if you have other information about the development of New Brompton after 1819 please post it in the appropriate, or a new, thread!)
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