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Horrid Hill & Sharps Green Cement Works

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Del:

--- Quote from: Maid of Kent on April 14, 2011, 11:43:32 ---Interesting topic for me! One of my great grandfather John Mudge's brothers - Thomas Mudge was the 'driver' on the little railway during the whole of that period. I always assumed it had a little steam engine but I believe it was horse drawn. When I was a child during the war the chalkpit was well on the way to being overgrown with hawthorn and birch and sundry other plant beginning to provide homes for various flora and fauna. My mother and I often went there on an exploration and once when my father was with us we climbed up out of it on the eastern side. We entered by scrambling down the bank by the side of the little bridge on the Lower Rainham Rd under which the rail track passed on its way to Horrid Hill. Looking at the site on Google Earth I rather gather it has been reopened

The last (as far as I know) occupants of Horrid Hill was an encampment for soldiers during the war. I cant telll you how long they were there, or how many there were,but once a week they marched along to East Court Farm where they had a bath - we had an Ascot gas water heater over the bath - so unlimited hot water. They were certainly camped out there one November because Mother and I went out to the camp to sell Poppies for Rememberance Day and I was most impressed because they bought a Poppy for their dog mascot and affixed it to it's collar.

The first occupants of that area were Homo Heidlebergensis of Paleolithic Period circ 400000 years ago who left 'tools' many of which came to light when the quarry was opened and the causeway was built

--- End quote ---

talkofthethames:
I found this site a few months ago when I was looking for help with a survey for my dissertation. I’ve been ‘lurking’ here ever since and saw this thread. I was in the area a little while ago and took some photos of the nearby Chetney Marshes and the old brick dock at Lower Halstow. They’re viewable on Flickr at http://www.flickr.com/photos/fallingmasonry/sets/72157627043854677/ if anyone wants a look. Hope they’re of interest and maybe a small thanks to everyone on this site who kindly completed the survey.

Maid of Kent:
The little chaple was about halfway down the lane at Sharpes Green on the left hand side. It was St Johns Mission Church, attached to St Mary Magdelane at Gillingham Green. It was built in the 1880's and closed when the Church was built in the Twydall development during the 1950's - my cousins were christened there in 1953.

Surrounded by Laurel and Yew trees the church was built of green painted corrugated iron and the inside was pannelled in wood that had been stained(?) a mahogany colour. I have a photo of the interior taken during a Harvest Festival sometime during the 30's -( sorry havent got round to learning how to post pictures yet) There were some very lovely Altar cloths (in my childish eyes) and these were kept wrapped in tissue paper in a chest of drawers at East Court Farm. Attached at right angles to the church was a small church hall - I had a farewell party for my little friends there at the end of 1943 when I moved away to Whitstable.

There were regular services every Sunday, which I attended with my great grandmother Ann Mudge and also the Sunday School, although there was an occassion when it was held at East Court Farm instead and as it finished I remember watching a mass of parachutists coming down over the Marshes. I was later told these were Italian pilots bailing out after being sent over here on a raid - can anyone confirm and give me a date please.

DaveTheTrain:
At the top of Sharps Green Lane there used to be a little chapel, it is shown on Old Maps, I always understood the name "Horrid Hill" came from the removal of bodies via the spit head to graves on deadmans Island, I guess this could be untrue.  However, the chapel is real and there are some remains.

Dave

Maid of Kent:
Interesting topic for me! One of my great grandfather John Mudge's brothers - Thomas Mudge was the 'driver' on the little railway during the whole of that period. I always assumed it had a little steam engine but I believe it was horse drawn. When I was a child during the war the chalkpit was well on the way to being overgrown with hawthorn and birch and sundry other plant beginning to provide homes for various flora and fauna. My mother and I often went there on an exploration and once when my father was with us we climbed up out of it on the eastern side. We entered by scrambling down the bank by the side of the little bridge on the Lower Rainham Rd under which the rail track passed on its way to Horrid Hill. Looking at the site on Google Earth I rather gather it has been reopened

The last (as far as I know) occupants of Horrid Hill was an encampment for soldiers during the war. I cant telll you how long they were there, or how many there were,but once a week they marched along to East Court Farm where they had a bath - we had an Ascot gas water heater over the bath - so unlimited hot water. They were certainly camped out there one November because Mother and I went out to the camp to sell Poppies for Rememberance Day and I was most impressed because they bought a Poppy for their dog mascot and affixed it to it's collar.

The first occupants of that area were Homo Heidlebergensis of Paleolithic Period circ 400000 years ago who left 'tools' many of which came to light when the quarry was opened and the causeway was built

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