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Author Topic: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.  (Read 32087 times)

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Barrowboy

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #45 on: June 15, 2012, 14:38:22 »
The technical changes in multiplex cinemas is gaining momentum. Certainly in the UK, and I suspect worldwide, conventional 35mm projection is being ditched in favour of digital projection. A modern projection box is strangely silent these days. Not only has the clatter of the film transport mechanism disappeared, they are also devoid of any human presence. The digital running order for the various screens is loaded and programmed by the cinema management team. No technical staff are required.

Mike Beeny

  • Guest
Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #44 on: June 13, 2012, 04:48:17 »
I was born in Whitstable (now live in New Zealand) As a kid I loved cinema. The Oxford always seamed to have the best films. I used to go and look at the stills displayed outside in those days and hoping that at least one films that week would be a U cert.  I always remember it being really dark in side and soooo big. My first A cert film which needed an adult to accompany was AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER with Cary Grant. I went with my Mum! I felt so adult seeing it, funny thing is I still love that film and have a copy on DVD.
The large valve in the cage  is a rectifier. One was used on each of the two projector lamp houses to provide the arc between 2 carbon rods which in turn produced the light. These rods needed about 25/29 volts DC at about 65/75 amps. (about 2 K Watts) They were really reliable and lasted almost forever. These days a Xenon lamp is used but still needs a rectifier of about the same voltage and current but diodes  are used instead of the valve.
Bingo was usually the first nail in the cinema coffin. As the Bingo tended to use the best days of the week , the poor cinema side tended to be left with the dregs. From this point it's the start of the end. The film distributors will not give the cinema first run films because of only 2 or 3 days a week. So less and less people attend, eventually the film side of cinema closes. The rest is history!!
It's so sad to see it closed but things move on, now it's multiplexes 3D and Digital cinema. For how much longer, who knows?
I kind of thank the Oxford for my great interest in film and the technical side of cinema. I have been involved in cinema from a humble projectionist to the chief technical engineer of a large multiplex company for over 40 years, but sadly only as a patron at the Oxford.
Mike Beeny
   

Offline man-of-kent

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #43 on: December 01, 2011, 15:19:33 »
I rember seeing one of those things in a trailor in Chatham Dockyard alongside a naval ship that was in for service back in the early 1970s. I don't know what it was being used for. Maybe I'll start a thread in the appropriate section of the KHF.
Derek Brice

Far away

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #42 on: December 01, 2011, 08:37:57 »
I hope it was located in another room. I see that there is a window behind it - imagine the eerie glow...

Barrowboy

  • Guest
Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #41 on: November 30, 2011, 16:30:31 »
I'd hate to think of the damage done to projectionists eyes. These things give off high amounts of UV radiation which can lead to macular degeneration in later years.

Far away

  • Guest
Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2011, 07:22:52 »
I was looking through the pictures on the first page when I saw this:



Doesn't look much, does it, some kind of dirty valve thing.

It is a mercury arc rectifier, to convert AC current to DC, presumably for the projectors. This is one of the coolest things in electronics, take a look at this one working on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGb-nUK41tc

There should be a pool of mercury at the bottom, but with the cage and glass being dirty I cannot see if it is still there.

They were once quite common, but although having loooong lives most have been replaced by more modern systems or the need for DC current has disappeared. I wonder if they kept it?

Chatham_Girl85

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2011, 18:17:11 »
Very nice pictures Barrowboy...


Well done on uploading them too :)

Barrowboy

  • Guest
Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2011, 17:35:14 »
Thanks Sheppy Bottles. Here goes, my 1st attempt at downloading from a Photobucket album:

[/ftp]





Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #37 on: September 27, 2011, 17:27:28 »

Barrowboy

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #36 on: September 27, 2011, 17:06:53 »
I visited the newly opened Peter Cushing earlier today. I must congratulate Wetherspoons on their supurb conversion. I took a few photos, which I would love to share with you folk, but the technology has defeated me! Can anyone tell me how to upload photos on this site?

stuart

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2011, 03:14:06 »
 about Wally, i think i can remember wally, my nan worked there from before WW2 to 1982 and wally & Peter Cushing used to say good morring to my mum and I on my way to  school.
i think wally use to ride a bike and he war a beret


stuart

  • Guest
Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2011, 03:00:59 »
 i have ask my dad about Peter Cushing and yes he used to go there every day or so
iit default adds an colt edge to the Oxford cinema
stuart

AnDy

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #33 on: September 04, 2011, 20:05:45 »
I spoke to Wally and his surname is Reynolds, he remembered Wally Duke but said he last saw him in the early 70's.

Ratsters

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Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #32 on: September 04, 2011, 14:08:34 »
Hi AnDy
Sadly, Wally died a long time ago - perhaps 15 to 20 years - so it won't be the same Wally. However, maybe the Wally/Walt you know, will know/remember something of Wally Dukes. (The more I think about it, the more I believe he was Dukes.)
His sister was Joan Philpott (nee Dukes [if I'm correct about that name!]) who lived in Sturry.

Thanks to everyone for your comments. Sorry my story is so vague! It came from a conversation with Joan when Wally died. Joan died within a few years of Wally. Both were well into their 80s I think.

AnDy

  • Guest
Re: The Oxford Cinema - Whitstable.
« Reply #31 on: September 02, 2011, 00:39:36 »
Ratsters, great story and thank you for adding this, I know a retired gentleman called Wally/Walt who was a Projectionist, no idea if it might be the same person as I do not know his surname or which Cinema's he may of worked in, but I see him most days and will now as him a few questions.  :)

 

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