News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Fort Pitt, Chatham.  (Read 71913 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7405
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #142 on: December 20, 2016, 10:00:53 »
There are plans earlier in the thread that shows the railway tunnel's position away from the fort.

I did wonder if this could have been a water tower but these are usually marked on a plan and none of the plans I have show this, they often show a well too but none are marked.

Offline jimawilliams

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 33
  • Appreciation 5
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #141 on: December 19, 2016, 21:34:29 »
A couple of interesting considerations.

I came across "Minutes of Evidence Given Before the Select Committee on Railway Bills The North Kent Lines 1845." 
Page 190 pays reference to the then  proposed tunnel/s under Fort Pitt.

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=iLg5AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA183&lpg=PA183&dq=vignoles+kent&source=bl&ots=UxRzoU6VLW&sig=xq7XHn-vgwNMKjHgGgfJG071_3E&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjY0N_8jYHRAhWHjpQKHcHOBs8Q6AEIGzAA#v=snippet&q=two%20tunnells&f=false

The image from Google Earth shows approximate location of the existing tunnel (red line) and structure in question (yellow cross).
"Change is the only constant"

Online Stewie

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 368
  • Appreciation 16
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #140 on: December 18, 2016, 21:40:03 »
Hi Keith

I would agree with you about the length of tunnel and the requirement for an air vent, Fort Pitt Tunnel is not long but is curved. Now my discipline is signalling and not civil engineering, so I may be wrong, but my understanding is that most air shafts started life as an access shaft to a inner point of the tunnel to enable it to be constructed faster, the curve may be relevant in this case. That said, the few times I walked through this tunnel in the 80's I never noticed signs of an air vent and the structure in the picture does not seem to be on the alignment anyway.
One other thing, I read a book about railways through the Medway Towns once but cannot remember the title. This book stated that the London, Chatham & Dover railway considered building a branch line to Chatham Dockyard from Chatham station with points in Fort Pitt tunnel. This application was opposed by the military because they considered that this work would undermine the foundations of Fort Pitt, so is the alignment on Google maps accurate?

As an aside, there is a terrific article on building Victorian railway tunnel on the 'Forgotten Relics of an Enterprising Age' website demonstrating the techniques. I have included a link here:
 
http://www.forgottenrelics.co.uk/tunnelvision/index.html

:-)

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #139 on: December 18, 2016, 16:58:59 »
Surely that tunnel is too short  to need a vent?

Online Stewie

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 368
  • Appreciation 16
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #138 on: December 15, 2016, 17:46:25 »
Whatever it is it seems to be made of a dark coloured material compared to the other structures nearby. Could it be a military memorial or commemoration tower?

Offline smiffy

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 912
  • Appreciation 59
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #137 on: December 15, 2016, 15:43:06 »
This is the only other clear(ish) view I can find.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7405
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #136 on: December 15, 2016, 11:58:21 »
None of my plans show this structure so I would assume it wasn't part of the fort.  However, as previous plans show this is definitely not part of the railway tunnel either!

Sorry I can't help, but I am intrigued as to what this is!

Offline jimawilliams

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 33
  • Appreciation 5
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #135 on: December 14, 2016, 20:50:57 »
1940 Google Earth appears to show some evidence of it remaining.
"Change is the only constant"

Offline smiffy

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 912
  • Appreciation 59
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #134 on: December 14, 2016, 20:32:12 »
You're right about the college car park, if it still existed it would be right in the middle of it. I thought about a vent for the railway tunnel but as you say it's well to the north of this location.

I've outlined it in red here on a map overlay, you can see the route of the tunnel at the top of the picture.


Online Stewie

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 368
  • Appreciation 16
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #133 on: December 14, 2016, 19:52:33 »
By my reckoning the structure is now on the site of the Art college car park but I think Fort Pitt tunnel passes to the North of this point. I have to confess I was not aware of this tunnel having an air vent and usually their original purposes was to allow the tunnel to be dug from a mid point as well as from the portals in so would be situated vertically above the tunnel.

Online Stewie

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 368
  • Appreciation 16
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #132 on: December 14, 2016, 19:44:27 »
It does look like a tunnel vent but not sure it is on the alignment of the railway?

Offline Longpockets

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 211
  • Appreciation 12
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #131 on: December 14, 2016, 19:23:46 »

I may have the wrong orientation of the site but is it a vent to the railway tunnel?


Offline smiffy

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 912
  • Appreciation 59
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #130 on: December 13, 2016, 20:45:11 »
Zooming in to this picture, in the centre there is something puzzling that I can't identify. It appears to be a column or perhaps a chimney/vent of some kind and stands perhaps fifteen feet tall and around six feet in diameter, by my reckoning. It appears on the 1866 OS map, but on no others that I have found and shows up clearly in only one other picture that I have seen. Perhaps one of our members can throw some light on the function of this structure.

Offline smiffy

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 912
  • Appreciation 59
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #129 on: December 12, 2016, 20:57:35 »
Nice aerial view from the northwest c.1920.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1394
  • Appreciation 218
Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #128 on: August 22, 2015, 23:35:15 »
4 photos of Crimean War wounded taken at 'Chatham Hospital' (Fort Pitt) 1855.

IWM (Q 71593) Wounded soldiers seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM (Q 71592) Wounded soldiers assemble in the grounds of Chatham Hospital in Kent during a visit by Queen Victoria during the Crimean War.

IWM (Q 71591) Wounded soldiers seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital. John Daniels, 55th Regiment and Robert Evans, 13th Light Dragoons.

Private Robert Evans (right) No1510. 13th Light Dragoons.
Born London c. 1833.
Lost left leg in the Charge of the Light Brigade.

The Commandant of the Chatham Garrison has received from her Majesty the photographic likeness of John Daniels and Robert Evans, which he is presenting on Wednesday next to these two young men, who are now at Fort Pitt. The former had 13 pieces of his skull taken away and the latter lost a leg under distressing circumstances.
Extract from the Naval and Military Gazette, 8 December 1855.

Amongst the number passed as "unfit for further service" held recently at the Brompton Barracks at Chatham, was Robert Evans of the 13th Light Dragoons, who has been at the Hospital nearly twelve months, and had received his injuries in an extraordinary manner.
In the Charge at Balaclava a shell entered the chest of his horse which rolled completely over, falling upon Evans when the shell burst inside the animal and tearing it open from the shoulders to the hindquarters, the weight of the animal nearly causing suffocation whilst in its death throes and inflicting serious contusions upon the legs of Evans, who would have expired had not a man of his troop and two Lancers released him.
Birmingham Daily Post,
2 January 1856.

More @ http://chargeofthelightbrigade.com/allmen/allmenE/allmenE_13LD/evans_r_1510_13LD.html

IWM (Q 71622) John Dryden, 11th Hussars (Prince Albert's), a wounded soldier seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.

Wounded in the Charge of the Light Brigade, with 27 lance wounds to back and sides, three sabre cuts to head and bridge of nose. Taken prisoner and exchanged at Odessa.

Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines