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Author Topic: Fort Pitt, Chatham.  (Read 71911 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #127 on: August 22, 2015, 22:43:24 »
5 photos of Crimean War wounded taken at 'Chatham Hospital' (Fort Pitt) 1855.

IWM (Q 71623) Clemence Brophy, 34th Regiment, a wounded soldier seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM (Q 71624) Jesse Lockhurst, 31st Regiment and Thomas O'Brien, 1st Royals, wounded soldiers seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM (Q 71621) Corporal Michael McMahon, 1st Royals, a wounded soldier seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM  (Q 71099) Thomas McRaving on crutches while recovering from his wounds at Chatham Hospital.
IWM  (Q 71106) Thomas Walker, left and Joseph Conolly who were presented to Queen Victoria on her visit to Chatham Hospital. Both were wounded at Inkermann.
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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #126 on: November 22, 2014, 23:53:09 »
The Queen's Visit to the Wounded Soldiers at Fort Pitt and Brompton. 1855.

At ten o'clock on Saturday morning, the Queen, accompanied by Prince Albert, the Prince of Wales, the Princess Royal, and suite, left the Bricklayers' Arms Station, from whence she was conducted in a special train to the terminus at Strood, at which station the Royal train arrived at seven minutes before eleven o'clock. Her Majesty was received on the platform by Robert Clement, Esq., the Mayor of Rochester, James Lewis, Esq., the town-clerk, and the whole body of the Corporation. The station was tastefully decorated, and there was under the command of Captain Wylde, a guard of honour, consisting of the Royal Marines from Chatham, accompanied by their band. Upon the Sovereign's arrival, a royal salute was fired from the batteries. The Mayor had the honour of presenting to the Queen the following address:--

"To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty:-
'We, your Majesty's most obedient and loyal subjects, the mayor, aldermen, and citizens of the city of Rochester, in the county of Kent, humbly crave leave to approach your Majesty on the occasion of your visit to this ancient city, with the assurance of our continued and hearty loyalty and attachment to your Majesty's person, house, and Government. In thus approaching your Majesty, we are reminded of the occasion which brings your Majesty to Rochester, for the purpose of evincing your royal sympathy and consideration for those brave and gallant men who are now suffering from the effects of the mighty war in which your Majesty is so justly engaged, to express our most cordial and sincere appreciation of your Majesty's consideration and benevolence, and our hearty concurrence in the generally expressed voice of the nation, of the necessity of vigorously prosecuting the pending war, and to add the trust that under the guidance and by the mercy of a mighty providence, the arms of your Majesty, with those of your Allies, may speedily triumph over our enemies, and restore the peace of nations, and with it the blessings and prosperity of peace to this kingdom.'

Her Majesty having graciously received the address, was then waited upon by the Commandant of the Garrison, Col. Kden, after which the Sovereign and suite proceeded in carriages to the Government House, and from thence she was accompanied to the hospital at Fort Pitt, by the Colonel Commandant and Admiral Gordon, and a bodyguard of Hussars from Maidstone being advance and rear of the cortege. At Fort Pitt the Queen was met by Dr. Dartnell, the principal staff medical man, and two staff surgeons. Her Majesty and Prince Albert went through the various wards, and to each of the men confined to their beds the Sovereign addressed words of sympathy and consolation. The poor fellows in this hospital number 197, and those whom the Queen spoke to in their beds were sobbing like children as her words fell upon their ears. Her Majesty was also visibly affected, though she had evidently summoned much fortitude to support her during the interview.
Upon the Queen leaving the wards, the convalescent patients, numbering some thirty, were drawn up in the forecourt under the verandah, and her Majesty went round to every one of the veterans, and expressed her concern for the dangers they had gone though. The brave fellows, obedient to discipline, could not cheer their Queen, but their features most eloquently spoke their loyalty and gratitude.
Her Majesty expressed to Dr. Dartnell her high approval of the hospital arrangements.

The Queen next proceeded to visit the Crimea invalids at Brompton Hospital, where they numbered 161, all severely wounded. The patients from St Mary's depot had been removed on the overnight to Brompton, in carriages, so that her Majesty might inspect all the veterans who had so recently shed their blood for the country, without being obliged to see them at St Mary's, where there are many soldiers invalided from causes not connected with the war.
At Brompton Hospital her Majesty expressed herself in similar terms of condolence to those so graciously uttered at Fort Pitt, and the gratitude of the soldiers was heartfelt. At Brompton, when her Majesty was leaving the wards, the wounded men cried out, 'God bless our Queen' while tears coursed down their wan cheeks, which ebullition of loyalty, under the pain of deep wounds, completely overcame the Sovereign, who sobbed as she re-entered her carriage. After driving though the barracks, the Queen and suite passed through the High-Street for the railway station, from whence she departed at 38 minutes past one o'clock, amidst the cheers of a large concourse of the townspeople.

The surgeons say that her Majesty's visit will cure more men than all the hospital care and attention could possibly accomplish.


From The Cornwall Chronicle (Australia) 20 July 1855.
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #125 on: November 22, 2014, 22:04:07 »
Young  Pte William 1630 13th LD

Was the man in the photo one of the unfortunate souls who were in the Charge of the Light Brigade?  If so he was lucky to survive!

William Young is not listed as being in any of the regiments that took part in the charge of the Light Brigade.
666 men are known to have taken part in the charge. 131 were killed and 140 were wounded. (Wiki says 118 killed).
Names and numbers taken from Hells Riders The truth about the Charge of the Light Brigade. by Terry Brighton. The author was on the curatorial staff of the Queen's Royal Lancers Regimental Museum.
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Offline prb

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #124 on: April 03, 2014, 17:26:07 »
A fair or circus
on Jacksons rec

Offline cliveh

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #123 on: April 03, 2014, 15:42:12 »
Aerial view from 1946:

cliveh

Offline cliveh

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #122 on: April 03, 2014, 15:41:49 »
Aerial view from 1946:

cliveh

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #121 on: January 24, 2013, 20:35:00 »
I would assume that once these were introduced after the thefts in 1805 all of the bricks used by the military would have been marked too. 

jammy36

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #120 on: January 24, 2013, 17:40:40 »
Two bricks showing the Board of Ordnance Mark which was included after 1805 due to the bricks being unloaded at the construction site of Fort Pitt being stolen.  The bricks were found at the Bicentenary Bridge site on Chatham Lines.

Interesting to see these bricks Kyn - if I recall identically stamped ones were used in the construction of the 1812 'A' Magazine at Lower Upnor

merc

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #119 on: January 24, 2013, 10:52:52 »
Tuesday, January 8, 1861

By direction of the authorities at the War Department, an extensive piece of ground has been marked out at Fort Pitt Hospital, and taken possession of by the sappers and miners of the Royal Engineers, on which to erect a commodious building to be used for the purposes of a museum to contain the large collection of valuable objects in natural history now deposited in the various buildings of the hospital, many of the objects being very much deteriorated through the want of proper buildings in which to deposit them. The new building will be erected close to the present medical school and museum, and will be sufficiently large to contain the whole of the valuables, which are constantly accumulating. The contract for the building has been taken by Mr. K. Spicer, builder, Strood, and the museum will at once be commenced.

From The Morning Post.

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #118 on: July 04, 2012, 18:38:44 »
Horse Guards
24th February 1841

The proposition for the removal of the whole of the Invalid Establishment from Fort Pitt at Chatham, to Deptford, involves the following considerations.
This Invalid Establishment was originally at Chelsea, and was, for very good reasons, removed from thence to Fort Pitt, that they might be placed in security, out of the reach of all that class of persons who made a prey of the soldiers and their families, who thus formed themselves, on their Discharge, in a state of complete destitution.
The Barracks at Deptford belong to the Admiralty, and are constructed for the reception of the Royal Marines to the extent of
1 Field Officer,
2 Captains,
4 Subalterns,
1 Staff Surgeon,
198 Men,
and they are occupied by a Detachment of the Regiment from Woolwich:
1 Field Officers, 2 Captains,
3 Subalterns,
1 Assistant Surgeon,
196 Non-commissioned Officers,
4 Privates,
as will be seen tot he full extent of their construction, and comprising a Garrison considered indispensible, by the Naval Authorities, for the protection of the Building and Stores in that large Dock Yard.
The Invalid Establishment at Fort Pitt at present consists of
1 Staff Captain,
1 Clerk to Superintendant,
1 Serjeant Clerk to Superintendant,
1 Paymaster,
3 Clerks to Paymaster,
3 Staff-Serjeants,
1 Assistant serjeant Major,
405 Invalids.
It is evident, therefore, that there is no Accommodation in the Dock Yard at Deptford for the reception of any part of this Establishment, and if there was, it would be more than (the rest of the letter is unfortunately missing.)




Two bricks showing the Board of Ordnance Mark which was included after 1805 due to the bricks being unloaded at the construction site of Fort Pitt being stolen.  The bricks were found at the Bicentenary Bridge site on Chatham Lines.

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #117 on: March 25, 2012, 22:54:35 »






A Statement of the Dwelling houses and other Buildings the Property of the Ordnance at Chatham let to Individuals, with the Rent arising therefrom.

No. on the PlansNamesDescription of BuildingRent for Annum Remarks
16Capt. Pudner & E. J. Comfy (?)HouseBy  60    
27Zach Tims (?)Canteen 50    
Total1,465  4  

A statement of the Storehouses, Magazines, Workshops &c. the property of the Ordnance at Chatham shewing their dimensions, the materials with which they are constructed, and the purposes to which they are applied.

No. on the Plan.Buildings.HeightLength.Breadth.Walls.Roof.No. of Stories.
101 (marked as 100 on plan)Fort Pitt Magazine 2 rooms each14.62817BrickBrick & TileOne
102Fort Pitt Bomb proof store24.353.919BrickBrick & TileTwo
103Fort Pitt Museum & Store23.73927BrickSlateThree
104Fort Pitt Bricklayers Shed6.9308.3BrickTileOne

A Statement of the Barracks at Chatham shewing the Number of Field Officers, Captains, Subalterns, Non-commissioned Officers and Private Men they are calculated to contain.

No. on the PlanNameSituationCalculated to contain
130Defensible Guardhouse.Left of Fort Pitt.
131General Hospital.Fort Pitt.3 Field Officers.
8 Captains.
9 Subalterns.
14 Non-commissioned Officers & Privates.
300 Patients.
132Casemated Barracks.Fort Pitt.540 Non-commissioned Officers & Privates.
133Tower.Fort Pitt.50 Non-commissioned Officers & Privates.
1342 Casemates flanking the right branch of the Horn Work.Fort Pitt.
1352 Casemates flanking the left branch of the Horn Work.Fort Pitt.
136Casemated guardhouse in the left counterscarp of the Horn Work.Fort Pitt.1 Non-commissioned Officer & 9 Privates.
137Casemates under the Ravelin in the south work front.Fort Pitt.
138Casemated guardhouse near the Barrier.Fort Pitt.
139Defensible guardhouse.Right of Fort Pitt.

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #116 on: February 28, 2012, 19:08:15 »
Lunatic Hospital, Fort Pitt.

This building is of recent construction, and is rather intended for a house of detention or of observation than for an asylum.  Patients are kept generally for a month or two, until their case is decided on, after which they are removed elsewhere if necessary.  The building, therefore, should not be judged of as a regular lunatic establishment.  The average inmates exceed 20.  There are three flats of wards along each side of the building, with a corridor running from end to end, and having the ward doors opening into it on either side.  The corridors communicate by a staircase, which also affords a means of ventilation and light.  Each corridor has two blind ends, in which are situated water-closets, and the only means of ventilating and lighting these ends, is by opening the water closet doors and windows.
The wards and day room are rather small, and have not that amount of cubic space per man required for the proper management of lunatics, while their small size, moreover, renders frequent entrance through the night necessary for supervision, and irritable patients are apt to be disturbed.
The general ventilation of the building requires improvement.  Suggestions for this and for other improvements have been made by the Medical Officer from time to time, and most of them we understand to have been included in the estimates for the present year.
The fence surrounding the building is only 4 feet high, and has been frequently cleared by patients at a bound.  This defect might be easily remedied.  Alterations might also be easily made in the water-closets at the end of the corridor, so as to enable light and air to enter the corridor without interfering with the closet.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #115 on: February 27, 2012, 20:38:37 »
It's a wonder anyone survived in those conditions, sounds diabolical.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #114 on: February 27, 2012, 19:08:38 »
Report of 1858
Casemate Hospital, Fort Pitt

There are no water-closets attached to this Hospital.  There are very offensive privies situated on the basement, and only to be reached by passing from the sick wards into the open air, descending a flight of steps, and traversing a cold, dark, underground gallery.  The privies are not drained; they are mere cesspools, the solid contents of which are removed when the vaults are full, which is the case usually once a year.  The operation of cleansing usually lasts a week, and the effluvia affects the entire atmosphere of the place.  The ashpit is situated in the vicinity of the privies, and close to the casemates.
The whole arrangements are as bad as is possible to conceive.
It is not our intention to recommend any improvements in this Hospital.  It is perhaps one of the very worst places for the reception of sick in existence, and we would recommend its immediate evacuation.  In fact, so bad is it, that the place should only be used for healthy men, under pressure of siege; but at no other time.

Wow!  This must be the worst report out of all of them so far, and I expected St. Mary's Barracks to have the worst!

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #113 on: February 27, 2012, 19:07:21 »
Report of 1858
Casemate Hospital, Fort Pitt

This Hospital consists of casemates sunk below the level of the ground on which the upper Hospital is built.  It is reached by descending flights of stairs.  The casemates open on the outer side on the external air on the hill sloping towards Chatham; and on the opposite side they open into the sunk area already mentioned.  Six of them, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, are used for sick; two others, H and I, formally used for sick, have been condemned as unfit for the purpose, and are occupied by orderlies and messengers, and one is occupied by the Hospital Serjeant in charge.
Each of the casemates used for sick is 60 feet long, 15 feet 9 inches wide, and 9 feet high.  Each casemate has five windows situated at the two opposite ends, so that the distance between the windows is no less than 60 feet.
Each casemate has one fireplace; but there are no ventilators in any of them.
They contain 24 beds each, with a space equal to 354 cubic feet per bed.
There are no water-closets attached to this Hospital.  There are very offensive privies situated on the basement, and only to be reached by passing from the sick wards into the open air, descending a flight of steps, and traversing a cold, dark, underground gallery.  The privies are not drained; they are mere cesspools, the solid contents of which are removed when the vaults are full, which is the case usually once a year.  The operation of cleansing usually lasts a week, and the effluvia affects the entire atmosphere of the place.  The ashpit is situated in the vicinity of the privies, and close to the casemates.
The whole arrangements are as bad as is possible to conceive.
It is not our intention to recommend any improvements in this Hospital.  It is perhaps one of the very worst places for the reception of sick in existence, and we would recommend its immediate evacuation.  In fact, so bad is it, that the place should only be used for healthy men, under pressure of siege; but at no other time.
Until the middle of October 1847, accommodation was provided in these casemates for sick wives and children of soldiers, and for lying in women.  The accommodation was very defective; but such as it was it has been withdrawn, and the wards closed.
It has been elsewhere stated, that married men occupy barrack rooms along with unmarried men, and the wives and children of these men have to be attended during sickness in the barrack rooms, or elsewhere, and dieted at their own expense, except in special cases.  There is no separate accommodation for lying in women, and there are from 150 to 200 confinements per annum in the garrison.  Before the female Hospital at Fort Pitt was closed, the admissions of women and children into it were never fewer than 200 per annum, besides about an equal number who were attended in barrack rooms, and in different parts of Brompton and Chatham.
It appears to us that where a case of such necessity as this exists, there is a clear duty to provide the requisite hospital accommodation.  It should certainly not be in Fort Pitt, nor in any other similar casemates; but a special hospital or decision ought to be set apart without loss of time for this class of cases.

 

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