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Author Topic: Fort Pitt, Chatham.  (Read 90247 times)

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Offline Stewie

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #133 on: December 14, 2016, 19:52:33 »
By my reckoning the structure is now on the site of the Art college car park but I think Fort Pitt tunnel passes to the North of this point. I have to confess I was not aware of this tunnel having an air vent and usually their original purposes was to allow the tunnel to be dug from a mid point as well as from the portals in so would be situated vertically above the tunnel.

Offline Stewie

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #132 on: December 14, 2016, 19:44:27 »
It does look like a tunnel vent but not sure it is on the alignment of the railway?

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #131 on: December 14, 2016, 19:23:46 »

I may have the wrong orientation of the site but is it a vent to the railway tunnel?


Offline smiffy

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #130 on: December 13, 2016, 20:45:11 »
Zooming in to this picture, in the centre there is something puzzling that I can't identify. It appears to be a column or perhaps a chimney/vent of some kind and stands perhaps fifteen feet tall and around six feet in diameter, by my reckoning. It appears on the 1866 OS map, but on no others that I have found and shows up clearly in only one other picture that I have seen. Perhaps one of our members can throw some light on the function of this structure.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #129 on: December 12, 2016, 20:57:35 »
Nice aerial view from the northwest c.1920.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #128 on: August 22, 2015, 23:35:15 »
4 photos of Crimean War wounded taken at 'Chatham Hospital' (Fort Pitt) 1855.

IWM (Q 71593) Wounded soldiers seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM (Q 71592) Wounded soldiers assemble in the grounds of Chatham Hospital in Kent during a visit by Queen Victoria during the Crimean War.

IWM (Q 71591) Wounded soldiers seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital. John Daniels, 55th Regiment and Robert Evans, 13th Light Dragoons.

Private Robert Evans (right) No1510. 13th Light Dragoons.
Born London c. 1833.
Lost left leg in the Charge of the Light Brigade.

The Commandant of the Chatham Garrison has received from her Majesty the photographic likeness of John Daniels and Robert Evans, which he is presenting on Wednesday next to these two young men, who are now at Fort Pitt. The former had 13 pieces of his skull taken away and the latter lost a leg under distressing circumstances.
Extract from the Naval and Military Gazette, 8 December 1855.

Amongst the number passed as "unfit for further service" held recently at the Brompton Barracks at Chatham, was Robert Evans of the 13th Light Dragoons, who has been at the Hospital nearly twelve months, and had received his injuries in an extraordinary manner.
In the Charge at Balaclava a shell entered the chest of his horse which rolled completely over, falling upon Evans when the shell burst inside the animal and tearing it open from the shoulders to the hindquarters, the weight of the animal nearly causing suffocation whilst in its death throes and inflicting serious contusions upon the legs of Evans, who would have expired had not a man of his troop and two Lancers released him.
Birmingham Daily Post,
2 January 1856.

More @ http://chargeofthelightbrigade.com/allmen/allmenE/allmenE_13LD/evans_r_1510_13LD.html

IWM (Q 71622) John Dryden, 11th Hussars (Prince Albert's), a wounded soldier seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.

Wounded in the Charge of the Light Brigade, with 27 lance wounds to back and sides, three sabre cuts to head and bridge of nose. Taken prisoner and exchanged at Odessa.


Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #127 on: August 22, 2015, 22:43:24 »
5 photos of Crimean War wounded taken at 'Chatham Hospital' (Fort Pitt) 1855.

IWM (Q 71623) Clemence Brophy, 34th Regiment, a wounded soldier seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM (Q 71624) Jesse Lockhurst, 31st Regiment and Thomas O'Brien, 1st Royals, wounded soldiers seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM (Q 71621) Corporal Michael McMahon, 1st Royals, a wounded soldier seen by HM Queen Victoria at Chatham Hospital.
IWM  (Q 71099) Thomas McRaving on crutches while recovering from his wounds at Chatham Hospital.
IWM  (Q 71106) Thomas Walker, left and Joseph Conolly who were presented to Queen Victoria on her visit to Chatham Hospital. Both were wounded at Inkermann.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #126 on: November 22, 2014, 23:53:09 »
The Queen's Visit to the Wounded Soldiers at Fort Pitt and Brompton. 1855.

At ten o'clock on Saturday morning, the Queen, accompanied by Prince Albert, the Prince of Wales, the Princess Royal, and suite, left the Bricklayers' Arms Station, from whence she was conducted in a special train to the terminus at Strood, at which station the Royal train arrived at seven minutes before eleven o'clock. Her Majesty was received on the platform by Robert Clement, Esq., the Mayor of Rochester, James Lewis, Esq., the town-clerk, and the whole body of the Corporation. The station was tastefully decorated, and there was under the command of Captain Wylde, a guard of honour, consisting of the Royal Marines from Chatham, accompanied by their band. Upon the Sovereign's arrival, a royal salute was fired from the batteries. The Mayor had the honour of presenting to the Queen the following address:--

"To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty:-
'We, your Majesty's most obedient and loyal subjects, the mayor, aldermen, and citizens of the city of Rochester, in the county of Kent, humbly crave leave to approach your Majesty on the occasion of your visit to this ancient city, with the assurance of our continued and hearty loyalty and attachment to your Majesty's person, house, and Government. In thus approaching your Majesty, we are reminded of the occasion which brings your Majesty to Rochester, for the purpose of evincing your royal sympathy and consideration for those brave and gallant men who are now suffering from the effects of the mighty war in which your Majesty is so justly engaged, to express our most cordial and sincere appreciation of your Majesty's consideration and benevolence, and our hearty concurrence in the generally expressed voice of the nation, of the necessity of vigorously prosecuting the pending war, and to add the trust that under the guidance and by the mercy of a mighty providence, the arms of your Majesty, with those of your Allies, may speedily triumph over our enemies, and restore the peace of nations, and with it the blessings and prosperity of peace to this kingdom.'

Her Majesty having graciously received the address, was then waited upon by the Commandant of the Garrison, Col. Kden, after which the Sovereign and suite proceeded in carriages to the Government House, and from thence she was accompanied to the hospital at Fort Pitt, by the Colonel Commandant and Admiral Gordon, and a bodyguard of Hussars from Maidstone being advance and rear of the cortege. At Fort Pitt the Queen was met by Dr. Dartnell, the principal staff medical man, and two staff surgeons. Her Majesty and Prince Albert went through the various wards, and to each of the men confined to their beds the Sovereign addressed words of sympathy and consolation. The poor fellows in this hospital number 197, and those whom the Queen spoke to in their beds were sobbing like children as her words fell upon their ears. Her Majesty was also visibly affected, though she had evidently summoned much fortitude to support her during the interview.
Upon the Queen leaving the wards, the convalescent patients, numbering some thirty, were drawn up in the forecourt under the verandah, and her Majesty went round to every one of the veterans, and expressed her concern for the dangers they had gone though. The brave fellows, obedient to discipline, could not cheer their Queen, but their features most eloquently spoke their loyalty and gratitude.
Her Majesty expressed to Dr. Dartnell her high approval of the hospital arrangements.

The Queen next proceeded to visit the Crimea invalids at Brompton Hospital, where they numbered 161, all severely wounded. The patients from St Mary's depot had been removed on the overnight to Brompton, in carriages, so that her Majesty might inspect all the veterans who had so recently shed their blood for the country, without being obliged to see them at St Mary's, where there are many soldiers invalided from causes not connected with the war.
At Brompton Hospital her Majesty expressed herself in similar terms of condolence to those so graciously uttered at Fort Pitt, and the gratitude of the soldiers was heartfelt. At Brompton, when her Majesty was leaving the wards, the wounded men cried out, 'God bless our Queen' while tears coursed down their wan cheeks, which ebullition of loyalty, under the pain of deep wounds, completely overcame the Sovereign, who sobbed as she re-entered her carriage. After driving though the barracks, the Queen and suite passed through the High-Street for the railway station, from whence she departed at 38 minutes past one o'clock, amidst the cheers of a large concourse of the townspeople.

The surgeons say that her Majesty's visit will cure more men than all the hospital care and attention could possibly accomplish.


From The Cornwall Chronicle (Australia) 20 July 1855.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #125 on: November 22, 2014, 22:04:07 »
Young  Pte William 1630 13th LD

Was the man in the photo one of the unfortunate souls who were in the Charge of the Light Brigade?  If so he was lucky to survive!

William Young is not listed as being in any of the regiments that took part in the charge of the Light Brigade.
666 men are known to have taken part in the charge. 131 were killed and 140 were wounded. (Wiki says 118 killed).
Names and numbers taken from Hells Riders The truth about the Charge of the Light Brigade. by Terry Brighton. The author was on the curatorial staff of the Queen's Royal Lancers Regimental Museum.

Offline prb

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #124 on: April 03, 2014, 17:26:07 »
A fair or circus
on Jacksons rec

Offline cliveh

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #123 on: April 03, 2014, 15:42:12 »
Aerial view from 1946:

cliveh

Offline cliveh

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #122 on: April 03, 2014, 15:41:49 »
Aerial view from 1946:

cliveh

Offline kyn

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #121 on: January 24, 2013, 20:35:00 »
I would assume that once these were introduced after the thefts in 1805 all of the bricks used by the military would have been marked too. 

jammy36

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #120 on: January 24, 2013, 17:40:40 »
Two bricks showing the Board of Ordnance Mark which was included after 1805 due to the bricks being unloaded at the construction site of Fort Pitt being stolen.  The bricks were found at the Bicentenary Bridge site on Chatham Lines.

Interesting to see these bricks Kyn - if I recall identically stamped ones were used in the construction of the 1812 'A' Magazine at Lower Upnor

merc

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Re: Fort Pitt, Chatham.
« Reply #119 on: January 24, 2013, 10:52:52 »
Tuesday, January 8, 1861

By direction of the authorities at the War Department, an extensive piece of ground has been marked out at Fort Pitt Hospital, and taken possession of by the sappers and miners of the Royal Engineers, on which to erect a commodious building to be used for the purposes of a museum to contain the large collection of valuable objects in natural history now deposited in the various buildings of the hospital, many of the objects being very much deteriorated through the want of proper buildings in which to deposit them. The new building will be erected close to the present medical school and museum, and will be sufficiently large to contain the whole of the valuables, which are constantly accumulating. The contract for the building has been taken by Mr. K. Spicer, builder, Strood, and the museum will at once be commenced.

From The Morning Post.

 

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