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Author Topic: St. Mary Magdalene, Cobham  (Read 5907 times)

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merc

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Re: St. Mary Magdalene, Cobham
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2010, 22:38:24 »




In the centre of the Chancel, next to Cobham's famous Brasses, is the alabaster table tomb of the 9th Baron Cobham, who died in 1558. It is of Flemish workmanship similar to the one of Count Lallaig at Hoogstraten in Belgium, and it's considered both tombs were done by the same sculptor. On the top rest effigies of Sir George Brooke and his wife, Lady Ann. On the sides are five shell canopied niches, with fluted columns of the Ionic order. Inside the niches are kneeling representations of George and Ann's ten sons, and at one end of the tomb are two of their daughters, kneeling, facing each other.



George Brook was titled Lord Cobham on the strength of his possesion of the town of Cobham. He was for many years Governor of Calais, and admitted into the Order of the Knights of Saint George. He was the last Lord Deputy of Calais. George Brook was one of the peers at the trials of Ann Boleyn and of the protector Somerset. He was a very popular Counsellor, and beloved on the account of his honours and virtues. When the monasteries were dissolved in 1536 he acquired the estates of the College of Cobham as his ancestors had provided them initially. George died with a fever on September 29th in 1558, aged 62. His son, Sir William Brook, called Lord Cobham by the former title of his family, dedicated the monument in 1561.

As stated earlier in the thread, the tomb suffered over the years, and in the eighteenth century it was shattered by a large beam which fell from the roof of the church. It was repaired in 1840 by George Hammerton, who had been carrying out work in Rochester Cathedral. The iron railing around the tomb was added in 1843, and further restoration work was carried out in 1865.


merc

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Re: St. Mary Magdalene, Cobham
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 12:26:44 »
Very interesting Kevin payne :)

There's restoration work being carried out in the church chancel at the moment, and most of the brasses have been covered up to protect them.

kevin payne

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Re: St. Mary Magdalene, Cobham
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2010, 13:34:31 »
It is said that a young t.e.lawrence came to the church,hid under a pew until the church was locked for the night,and spent the whole night brass-rubbing,sneaking out again in the morning.My father and his parents lived at cobham and worked at cobham hall for the then lord darnley.

merc

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St. Mary Magdalene, Cobham
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2010, 15:47:54 »


The church stands on the highest point in the village and is well worth a look inside when it's open. It's probably best known for having the finest collection of monumental brasses in one place, in their original settings. The Chancel was built in about 1220 on the site of an earlier structure. In 1362 Sir John de Cobham founded a Chantry and lavishly repaired the church laying down brasses inside for his Aunt and Uncle, his Brother and himself (40 years before he died). Later more brasses were laid down to his descendants. In the centre of the Chancel is the alabaster table tomb of George Brooke (d. 1558). The tomb suffered over the centuries, and in the eighteenth century a large beam fell onto it causing great damage, it was later much restored.




Just outside the church porch is the Hayes family vault. They built nearby Owletts and Meadow House




Some of the Earls of Darnley memorials




 

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