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Author Topic: Severe Weather 1987  (Read 24924 times)

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Natator

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2011, 15:26:03 »
 
I remember the wrong kind of snow and that banshee wind, but remind me about 'black monday'.

Offline cliveh

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2011, 15:03:16 »
I agree 1987 was probably the worst snowfall I've ever experienced so far. I was only 6 in 1963 and living in Essex then but can't really remember much from that year.

In '87 I was living in West Malling and working in Dunton Green, near Sevenoaks. On the Monday after the huge snowfalls of the previous day, I left at 5am to drive the 12 miles to work.  I seemed to be the only fool on the road! I eventually arrived in Dunton Green at 8.30am! I was the only one at work until 11am! The weather got worse as the day went on and heard on the radio that all my roads back home had been closed. Couldn't of driven anywhere anyway as by now my car was completely buried in snow. Ended up staying in a hotel for two nights and only just made it back home on the third!

It was a truly awful year with the snow, the hurricane and "Black Monday"!

cliveh

Retron

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2011, 19:15:50 »
A fantastic thread - the snow of 1987 is what crystallised my love of the weather.

The 12th January 1987 was the coldest day of our lifetimes - and we may never see such a cold day again, such is the rarity of that cold. At Southend (the nearest official station to Leysdown, where I live) the maximum was -7C and the minimum was -12C. Bearing in mind the wind was coming in from the sea, that was exceptionally cold. It's no wonder then that all the warmth from the sea ended up generatic some fantastic convection and deluges of "lake effect" snow.

I still remember that week well, despite only being 8 at the time. I'd gone back to school, after Christmas, then it started to snow over the weekend. The 12th, a Monday, saw howling easterly winds and sheets of snow billowing around pretty much all day long. Needless to say school was out of the question and we lost power (and hence heating). We ended up lugging the paraffin heater from the greenhouse and that, combined with our gas oven, became our source of heat. We were the only ones in the street who had a gas oven and my mum ended up making casserole for our neighbours!

The temperature stayed below freezing for a week after the 12th and the icicles grew long and heavy, before my dad unsportingly knocked them down with a broom! I was most unimpressed.

Jenkins Hill near Eastchurch (side note: it's never called that on maps, wonder where that name came from...) was blocked for several days and yes, there were deliveries of bread and milk by Chinook helicopter towards the end of the spell. I took it in my stride, as the previous couple of winters had been snowy and I'd assumed this was normal!

Eventually the ploughs got through Jenkins Hill and I remember on the first day back at school looking out of the coach windows and seeing the hedges covered by snow - literally a cutting through 10-feet drifts. That snow lasted for ages afterwards!

At the time my gran warned me that snow like that was most unusual and some years we didn't even have snow on the ground. I didn't believe her, but she was right. We didn't see proper snow again until 1991.


Offline Lyn L

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2011, 09:04:43 »
NCR

It was a supplement by Associated Kent Newspapers.. CR&G News and Chatham Standard covered as well as other Kent newspapers, just called Snow Special  ( 30p ) Very interesting if you can still get it ? mine is very moth eared after all this time there may well have been different pics in the actual CRG news at the time though.

The snow started on a family birthday 10th Jan , we were off to Austria for the snow mid Feb, had plenty still left on the ground this side of the water but NONE in Austria that winter  :) so we went the following year and had over 5ft of it , yum !
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Offline Stewie

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #24 on: August 20, 2011, 08:08:14 »
I remember I was still working for British Rail when the snows came and had recently transferred from the signalling maintenance to the design office in Croydon in 1986. I was unable to get to Croydon and so reported to the local depot at Rochester where I became part of a hastily assembled 3 man 12 night shift of other displaced S&T staff clearing points of fresh snow and other duties to try and get trains moving.
During a walk to Rochester Bridge Junction we crossed the rail bridge and a Snow Plough pushed by a Class 33 diesel came along heading for Rochester.
It was the practice at the time for staff to climb into the lattice work on the side of the bridge to get clear of trains. From this vantage point I peered out and my view of the snow plough was a solid wall of snow moving along the rails towards me, a sight I shall never forget!
This is the only time I ever saw a snow plough in these parts.

Minsterboy

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2011, 06:16:14 »
I worked in Sheerness Docks at the time and I recall, I think it was the beginning of that week, walking in to work from Minster first thing in the morning in a really bad blizzard, just to be sent home like all the Docks, until further notice.
We eventually got back into work on the Saturday morning and my first job in the deep snow that was still laying around, was re-stacking packs of pine timber that were hanging over the side of a Swedish Gorthon boat. All her deck cargo had shifted in the gales earlier in the week as she came into the Thames Estuary and a lot of the timber actually went overboard and was collected and kept by people at Leysdown and Shellness.

keith-17

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2011, 14:06:12 »
ah yes i remember that year , i was out delivering in the car the night it really started to snow and just made it back to Ashford around 11pm ...after that all the roads in and out of ashford where impassable for a few days
and the old Motel (now a housing estate) along the A20 just past Charing towards lenham was cut off for about a week with stranded motorists staying there

 also the lowest recorded temp for a very long while was -21 ( i think ) at Pluckley

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2011, 11:47:14 »
Nothing on the Darland Banks or Kings Frith field, pic of an RAF Chinook air lifting an Army Landrover from Police HQs in Maidstone to High Halstow and another with soldiers AND Mr  John Stanley who was Minister for the Armed Forces at the time helping  :)   unload the supplies to 'stricken' villagers .The whole of Kent is shown in different pics so if anybody wants a particular place looked at I can look to see if there's where you want. Plenty of text too. One reads....

Inmates of Eastchurch's Standford Hill prison kept people at the eastern end of Sheppey supplied with fresh bread and milk. The prison has its own bakery and a pasteurisation plant for the milk produced by its 150 cows. Milk surplus to the prisons requirements is usually taken away by tankers but they couldn't get through and that meant gallons of milk was handed out free to islanders.

Another one ( Poor bloke )

Salesman Dave Major was one of the few Medway workers to struggle through the snow to get to London on the first working day of the freeze---- only to be told he was being made redundant. To add insult to injury , his company car was taken away and Mr Major who lives in Gingham , was left to attempt the journey home by train.

I don't know whether the poor man had the same experience as you NCR , he probably didn't think the countryside was at all beautiful on the train home .

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Offline Lyn L

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2011, 10:42:50 »
It looks as though I got sidetracked ( what's new ) and never got back to the supplement about the snow. There are loads more so I'll drag it out again and see what's in there. Some show soldiers helping to ferry in supplies perhaps there are some of the Darland Banks ?
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Deano

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2011, 02:32:59 »
love the pics, not cos of the snow as such, but love lookin at the old shops in sheerness high street, many of them names come and gone now

i know the winter of 1962-63 was suposed to be the coldest ever since......

cos my mate always tells us he was born that year and he used to sleep in the bottom drawer cos they never had a cot and it was the coldest winter ever !

NCR

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2011, 00:30:35 »
Good grief. I was walking behind that Photographer at the time. Brings back memories. I think he or a colleague also took pics on the Darland Banks and I'm in shot on those. Would love to see the full supplement to see if I'm correct.

The trains weren't running to London (yes - no work!!) but unbelieveably one or two were actually attempting to head coast-bound. So I hopped on one to see a g/f in Sittingbourne. Well.. may as well enjoy the day off :)

Reduced power to the pick up meant no lights in the carriage. The flashes from the rail lit up the frozen countryside between Rainham and Sittingbourne beautifully. Was quite a sight.

Train actually made it too. Just.

PS Seem to recall i wasn't physically able to buy a ticket either... what a great weekend away.

darrenh

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #17 on: August 19, 2011, 00:20:50 »
all i remember is getting a full week and a half off of primary school.  this was also the year we made an igloo in the side garden using an old washing up bowl to form the bricks. 

Merry

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2011, 21:10:03 »
I was living with my parents in Wigmore at the time.  I recall people taking sledges over to the Savacentre to get bread and milk, and I think there were power cuts (though I may be confusing that with the aftermath of the hurricane.)

I also have a memory of a military helicopter dropping supplies in King's Frith field - does anyone else recall that?

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2011, 10:38:32 »
As I recall, the snow itself although deep wasnt that bad on the Isle of Sheppey. I was working in Sheerness Docks at the time. The snow fell overnight and the following day, I drove from Gillingham to the island and got as far as Cowstead Corner before the engine in the car froze up. I walked the rest of the way to the docks from there and arranged for a garage to pick my car up. The tow truck came from Eastchurch and towed my car there. Luckily, my nan lived on Bartons Hill Drive, so I stayed the night there. The wind got up that night and that was where the problems really started. Although only a little snow fell that night, the wind whipped up huge snowdrifts which cut off not only the Island from the mainland, but also all the towns and villages on the island from each other. I saw RAF Chinook and Puma helicopters flying in supplies and army diggers to clear the roads.
Once the roads had been cleared, I got a lift to Eastchurch to pick up my car and we passed an army digger which had gone down a ditch on the way.
Ended up staying a fortnight on the Island, which was OK, but my nan, bless her, still thought I was about 8 and treated me like it (I was 24 at the time).
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Offline Lyn L

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Re: Severe Weather 1987
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2011, 16:21:16 »


Watling St Gillingham

There are a load more but I'd take every bit of space up on the forum , but I'll have another 'go' at them and see if I can resize and get them just a bit smaller.  :)
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

 

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