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Author Topic: Surgeon Sidney Bernard  (Read 27754 times)

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Offline kyn

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Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2010, 18:29:59 »
Well....it seems Dr. Bernard was not a volunteer on board the Eclair!  A Dr. Mclure was in fact the doctor who volunteered on the ship and Sdney Bernard was appointed from HMS Growler on the previous doctors death!

Oh, and if you ask nicely I will post a photograph of the plaque that was recovered from Sidney Bernard's grave in the 50's  :)

Offline kyn

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Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2010, 20:16:22 »
I have been looking for one too but have never found one, not sure who is likely to have one?

Offline Jason

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Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2010, 19:04:23 »
Sidney Bernard (1818-1845)

Volunteer Surgeon on HMS Elclair for Royal Navy.

In 1845 after serving on anti-slavery duty off west Africa, where crew members contracted a very virulent form of Yellow Fever through which the Captain, Surgeon and Assistant Surgeon had died, the HMS Eclair returned via Madeira to England.  On arriving at Madeira Mr Sidney Bernard, hearing of the crew's plight and also returning to England on another ship, the Rolla, volunteered instead to serve on the Eclair and was appointed Temporary Surgeon. 

The fever-ridden
Eclair arrived at the quarantine station, Burntwick Island in the Medway Estuary, on 2nd October 1845.  Bernard was taken ill on the 3rd and died on the 9th October 1845, by which time 74 officers and men out of a compliment of 146 had died. 

This brave, unselfish man was interred on Burntwick Island, his grave being marked by an upright headstone reading "Sacred to the memory of Sidney Bernard, L/Surgeon, R.N. and son of the late William Bernard of Knocklyon House, County Dublin, who departed this life the 9th October 1845, on board HMS Eclair whilst performing quaratine at stangate Creek aged 27." 

The headstone later fell and was broken.  It was repaired and then set in concrete horizontally over the grave, with iron railings erected around it.  A bronze memorial tablet set in oak was also fixed to the railings.  This was rediscovered in the mud in the 1950's and housed in R.N. Hospital, Chatham, as it was then.  The lonely gr
ave is rapidly disappearing from sight in the mud of the island and now only the railings are visable at low tide.


Is there a photo of the grave anywhere?  I haven't been able to find one, and I can't see it on Google or Bing.

Cheers

Jason

Offline kyn

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Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2008, 20:04:13 »
02 Oct. , 1845 , ?CLAIR (1811), paddle sloop, returning from West Africa, sent to Stangate Creek, rife with yellow fever; 74 deaths out of 146 crew. Surgeon Sidney Bernard of the ROLLA (1829), brig-sloop, volunteered his services, but he also died a week later.

Offline kyn

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Surgeon Sidney Bernard
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2008, 23:42:13 »
Sidney Bernard (1818-1845)

Volunteer Surgeon on HMS Elclair for Royal Navy.

In 1845 after serving on anti-slavery duty off west Africa, where crew members contracted a very virulent form of Yellow Fever through which the Captain, Surgeon and Assistant Surgeon had died, the HMS Eclair returned via Madeira to England.  On arriving at Madeira Mr Sidney Bernard, hearing of the crew's plight and also returning to England on another ship, the Rolla, volunteered instead to serve on the Eclair and was appointed Temporary Surgeon.  

The fever-ridden Eclair arrived at the quarantine station, Burntwick Island in the Medway Estuary, on 2nd October 1845.  Bernard was taken ill on the 3rd and died on the 9th October 1845, by which time 74 officers and men out of a compliment of 146 had died.  

This brave, unselfish man was interred on Burntwick Island, his grave being marked by an upright headstone reading "Sacred to the memory of Sidney Bernard, L/Surgeon, R.N. and son of the late William Bernard of Knocklyon House, County Dublin, who departed this life the 9th October 1845, on board HMS Eclair whilst performing quaratine at stangate Creek aged 27."  

The headstone later fell and was broken.  It was repaired and then set in concrete horizontally over the grave, with iron railings erected around it.  A bronze memorial tablet set in oak was also fixed to the railings.  This was rediscovered in the mud in the 1950's and housed in R.N. Hospital, Chatham, as it was then.  The lonely grave is rapidly disappearing from sight in the mud of the island and now only the railings are visable at low tide.

Here is a pic of a map i found with the quarantine station marked at Stangate Creek.  Sorry about the quality.

 

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