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Author Topic: Fire at Old Brompton - 1885  (Read 4115 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Fire at Old Brompton - 1885
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2013, 23:02:37 »
I'm pretty sure that is the building smiffy. I'm still trying to find out more about it, as well as another music hall that was apparently to the rear of the Sun in the Wood in the High Street (which was apparently destroyed by a fire in 1892).
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Offline smiffy

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Re: Fire at Old Brompton - 1885
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2013, 22:54:30 »
Leofwine, could the music hall be the building I've highlighted here? Looks like access may have been through the covered alleyway leading to some steps seen to the left.


Offline Leofwine

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Re: Fire at Old Brompton - 1885
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2013, 19:09:50 »
Another account of the fire:

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 31 October 1885
CHATHAM.
DESTRUCTIVE FIRE
. — A serious fire occurred Sunday afternoon in Wood-street, Old Brompton, near Chatham. in the Shepherd and Shepherdess public-house and in Army and Nary Music Hall, the latter covering a large area of ground. A large fire-party, numbering some two hundred Sappers, under Colonel Bruce Brine and Captain Battle, immediately proceeded the scene of the outbreak. Owing the fact that the burning premises are situated in the midst of a thickly-populated neighbourhood, and close proximity to her Majesty's Dockyard, at Chatham, considerable excitement prevailed. The flames spread with alarming rapidity, owing to the rear portion of the premises being chiefly constructed of wood, and grave apprehensions were entertained at first that range of small tenements would become involved. Special messengers were despatched summon all the available brigades in the district, and with commendable promptitude the Metropolitan Police Fire Brigade, under Superintendent Smith, the Chatham Fire Brigade, and the Gillingham Brigade responded. After working for three hours the fire was got under. Both the public-house and the music  hall were, however, completely destroyed, and considerable damage was done to the surrounding property, the tenants of which in many instances lost the whole of their furniture and were uninsured.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Fire at Old Brompton - 1885
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2010, 17:20:41 »
That is really interesting Merc, and ties in with a problem I was having with my Brompton Pubs investigation. Someone told me the Shepherd and Shepherdess burned down and after it was rebuilt it was renamed the Beresford arms. As it was still the Shepherd and Shepherdess in the 1891, I guess the renaming was not immediately after the rebuilding from the fire.  Unless of course it had yet another fire later. I have a pic showing that by 1907 the Shepherd & Shepherdess had become the Beresford arms, so the name change must have happened between 1891 and 1907.

I hadn't heard of the Army and Navy Music Hall, I wonder if that was beside or behind the pub? (Anyone else know anything about this) If it was beside, I'm now wondering if the rebuilding after the fire is when the Dew Drop first appears? In 1881 there is no pub listed at 21 Wood Street (the property next to the S & S), there is a Royal Marine Corporal and his family as head, along with a lodger who is a publican, plus a second family consisting of a tailor & milliner.  In 1891 there is a Mary McCarthy (Beer Seller) and her son Joseph (Bar Man) living there, but frustratingly the pub is not named. In 1901 both 19 (Shepherd & Shepherdess/Beresford Arms) and 21 are pubs, but again, frustratingly both are unnamed in the census.  By the 1911 Census they are recorded as the Beresford Arms and the Dewdrop. I can find no record of the Beresford Arms after 1918 (which ties in with a photo I have of the Dew Drop c.1920 where there appears to be no building to the right of the dew drop, the site of the Shepherd & Shepherdess/Beresford Arms).

I guess I need to dig out some Kelly's or similar to narrow down these dates.


Am I the only one that can't help noticing the irony that in the photo the surviving building on the left in merc's pic is now the one that appears to be the burned out/demolished one.


Cutting from Medway Extra comprising reproduction of photograph of street frontage of Dewdrop public house, 21 Wood Street, Brompton, showing six men and a boy in civilian working dress and Royal Navy sailor in sailor's suit and cap, all looking at camera. Also showing part of Beresford Arms public house to the right (no.19, formerly 'The Shepherd & Shepherdess'). Couchman's accompanying notes suggest central figure is a Mr. Shrub, cab owner and figure on extreme right is W.E. Dennord. Original exposed c.1907, published 8 April 1983.
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merc

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Fire at Old Brompton - 1885
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2010, 15:17:55 »


Shortly after 3 o'clock, on the afternoon of October 25th, 1885, a fire was reported in Lower wood Street, Old Brompton. The Shepherd and Shepherdess Public House and the large Army and Navy Music Hall were both alight. The alarm was raised to nearby Brompton Barracks, and a fire-party of 200 Sappers under the command of Colonel Bruce Brine and Captain Battle, immediatly rushed to the scene. Owing to the fact that the premises were situated in a thickly populated neighbourhood and in close proximity to Chatham Dockyard, great excitement prevail
ed. The buildings were partially made of wood, and the flames spread quickly. It was at one stage feared a range of small tenements, close by, may also catch fire. Special messengers were despatched to summon all the available brigades in the district, and soon the Metropolitan Police Fire Brigade, under Superitendant Smith, the Chatham Fire Brigade, and the Gillingham Fire Brigade arrived. They all worked on the fire for three hours untill it was finally under control. The Public House, which had survived a previous fire in 1860, and the Music Hall were completely destroyed, as well as considerable damage to surrounding properties. Luckily there's no report of any serious injuries.

Info from The Times

 

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