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Author Topic: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway  (Read 31254 times)

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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2011, 16:26:57 »
Sorry to disappoint but the cylinder block aint there. This was as of half an hour ago. It was about two feet six high and about eighteen inches in diameter with the square valve box on one side. It vanished abot two years ago and I was wondering if it was removed for some reason or whether the local itinerant scrap dealers had it away one night. That said it must have weighed in the region of about a ton......
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2011, 20:31:34 »
Does anyone know what happened to the cylinder block that was part of the engine? It was for many years located with the fly-wheel at the back of the Castle. One more thing, are there any pics in existance of one of the winding engines? They were there quite a while before loco traction took over. You can alway tell which way the train is going on this line as the smokebox ALWAYS points to Canterbury so the crew did not get overcome by the fumes in the tunnel. Regards, Sentinel S4.

Hi,

Had a look today - the cylinder block is still there - dumped behind the building by the fly-wheel and covered in rust!!!

John

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2011, 23:24:33 »
The C&W was the first non-mineral railway built for the purpose of making money. It beat the Stockton line by a few months and that was built for carrying coal. Both lines were built by Stephenson and both were built with rope worked inclines on long stretches. A few years later the Stockton line was rebuilt and most of the steeper inclines were bypassed or eradicated. The C&W sadly did not have the same care and remained to the end almost as built. It was only that locomotives got more powerful that spelt the end of the winding engines. Yes the little SER R and R1 class were used but I have also seen pics of an O class tender engine on the line. The locos that were stationed for use to Whitstable were shedded at Canterbury West and all had cut down fittings, a shorter chimney and dome as well as lowered cab roof, to fit through Tyler Hill Tunnel. The C&W had a few claims to fame, the first season ticket issue for example. It also had two bridges. One out towards Bogshole which was/is a farm occupation bridge and another. This is the important one for historical purpose as it crossed an existing road and was built to allow the passage of vehicles, it was a long time until the first cars so we can assume that they meant horse drawn vehicles. The Stockton line was built on ground level with no really heavy earth works. The next line built was the Liverpool and Manchester and this combined lessons learned from both the C&W and the Stockton line, but the oldest railway bridge in existance is the Causey Arch on the Tanfield railway. This is up north and was built for the conveyance of Coal and, as far as I know, never carried passengers. The Whitstable bridge did. As much as I despise official vandals this bridge really did have to go. It was too small for most vehicles,  and created a huge bottleneck arount the town. It must be remembered that theselines were built in the Georgean era, not Victorian, and they were on a very steep learning curve so they built to the sizes that they understood. I think that it is sad that this line has gone as it could have been developed much like the Addiscombe line in Croydon and become a modern Tram way. That would have helped take traffic away from the roads.  Sentinel S4.  
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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2011, 16:33:24 »
Does anyone know what happened to the cylinder block that was part of the engine? It was for many years located with the fly-wheel at the back of the Castle. One more thing, are there any pics in existance of one of the winding engines? They were there quite a while before loco traction took over. You can alway tell which way the train is going on this line as the smokebox ALWAYS points to Canterbury so the crew did not get overcome by the fumes in the tunnel. Regards, Sentinel S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

patmore

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2011, 20:20:26 »
Am I right in saying that those little R1 locos finished their days assisting the boat trains up the gradient away from Folkstone harbour? I am sure I once saw a photo of two working together doing just that.
                                                                                  James

PG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2011, 19:29:48 »
I don't suppose that were many railway cranes at Whitstable. With such a low tunnel on the Crab and Winkle line, and locos having to have their smoke stacks cut down to get through, I wonder if they had to bring the crane in by sea. I will have to do some more digging. PG

BenG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2011, 16:38:56 »
Southern portal of the Tyler Hill tunnel:


Track bed towards Canterbury from the tunnel:

PG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2010, 21:00:49 »
I have done some research into my family history, and have found that my Great Grandfather was an engine driver living at Whitstable harbour in 1901, presumably the engine was on the C&W line. Later in 1911 he was a Railway Steam Crane driver at Whitstabl harbour. Has anyone any information about such a crane at the harbour?

LenP

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2010, 22:32:19 »
Remains of occupation underpass, St. Stephens Field, Canterbury.


BenG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2010, 13:16:41 »
Remains of the bridge over Old Bridge Road:




Remains of the bridge over Teynham Road:



BenG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2009, 18:40:27 »
A few pictures of the 1930s art-deco Southern Railway bridge carrying the old Thanet Way across the railway.







A pedestrian crossing gate (?) leading to All Saints Church:


Trackbed towards Canterbury:

BenG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2009, 21:08:13 »
Thanks to LenP for identifing this wheel:

These are the remains of a stationary winding engine that once hauled trains up the gradients that were too steep for Invicta on the Canterbury and Whitstable line (Source In The Tracks Of Railway History by Mike Page published by the Whitstable Improvement Trust).






LenP

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2009, 22:11:43 »
Here is said bridge.



This one is postdated 1962.

marmalade

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2009, 23:07:20 »
Thank you, super pictures!

I've just been reading a little more about it, and I see that the "world's first railway bridge", according to the Crab and Winkle Line Trust, was knocked down in 1971 to make way for cars.  :'(


BenG

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Re: The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2009, 17:08:38 »
Heres a few pictures from the line:

The bridge in the embankment just before the Thanet Way:
View from the across the field:






The parapets have fallen off:


Some of the brickwork:




The trackbed looking towards Canterbury:


What I think is the second storage pond for the winding engine:


In the middle of the line is the Winding Pond which was built in 1829 to provide water for the steam winding engines used to pull the carriages out of Whitstable.


The trackbed from the pond towards Canterbury:


and from the pond towards Whitstable:


 

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