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Author Topic: Gravesend Blockhouse  (Read 6714 times)

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Offline cliveh

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2016, 11:50:04 »
The remains of the Blockhouse:

cliveh

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2015, 21:31:32 »
The Excavation of the Gravesend Blockhouse,1975-76
25 page paper by D. Thompson and Mrs. V. Smith. Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 93 1977.
Available online @http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.093 - 1977/093-11.pdf

Introduction
"After King Henry VIII's break with the Pope, the possibility of invasion from the Continent led to the building of a system of coastal fortifications from Hull to Milford Haven, among them being five small blockhouses in the Thames estuary, the order given to build these being given in 1539.
Of these five blockhouses, one was built at East Tilbury and one at Higham, although neither of these are now in existence so far as can be ascertained. Another was built at Tilbury (now buried under the curtain wall of Tilbury fort) and the remaining two at Gravesend, one (Milton blockhouse) at the western end of the canal basin and the other at the site of the Clarendon Royal Hotel. It is the last one which is the subject of this paper.
This historical background to this blockhouse has been published in
Arch. Cant., Ixxxix (1974), (V. T. C. Smith, The Artillery Defences at Gravesend') and should be read in conjunction with this paper."

The Artillery Defences at Gravesend. Victor T. C. Smith. 31 pages.
Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 89 1974.
Online @ http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.089 - 1974/089-11.pdf
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

Offline kyn

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2008, 09:55:07 »
My one and only picture of New Tavern Fort...


merc

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2008, 23:16:44 »

I've got this one ;D

There is an original plan in one of my books, but the detail isn't too clear on it.

merc

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2008, 11:25:33 »
Gravesend Blockhouse,17th Century


Tilbury Fort 1773,with the Union flag flying from the Tudor Blockhouse


Tilbury Fort Plan,1669

merc

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2008, 00:07:35 »
Unfortunately not Kyn :(
3 of them were demolished some time after 1558.
The Gravesend and the the one at West Tilbury were kept though.
The one at Tilbury was modified and a larger defended enclosure made around it. (may post a plan of this sometime)
Then it was later turned into a gunpowder magazine when the Fort was rebuilt in the 17th Century, but I think it was later demolished when further changes were made to the fort.

I have also found a print of the Gravesend Blockhouse I might post sometime.


Offline kyn

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Re: Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2008, 22:26:17 »
It's a shame this was demolished.  Anyone know if any of the others remain?

merc

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Gravesend Blockhouse
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2008, 11:10:54 »
I think it might have been Col who pointed this out to me a little while ago when we were at Gravesend.


The Gravesend Blockhouse was one of five small forts built in 1539/40 on either side of the lower Thames to protect the river approaches to London against the possibility of an attack by an enemy fleet. This was part of Henry VIII's national programme of defence.

All that remains of Henry's Blockhouse today is the foundations excavated during the 1980s. When Henry VIII visited here he would have seen a D-shaped brick and stone tower pierced with gun ports, as would Charles II who used the Blockhouse as a banqueting hall. By the 18th Century, it has become a gunpowder storage magazine, before being demolished in 1844 to make way for the gardens of the Clarendon Royal Hotel.





 

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