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Author Topic: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough  (Read 9473 times)

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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2016, 22:00:21 »
This attributes the two long brick structures to EKLR locomotive maintenance sheds (hm) and says they are/were due to be refurbished


Oh dear. Why does this legend persist? They had nothing to do with the EKR and everything to do with the coal mine, I have seen (somewhere, my memory fails me) the same said of Guilford. ALL maintenance was done at/in Shepherds Well (Siberts Wold) yard, they mainly used the incomplete spur leading to the main line in the Canterbury direction. Someone has even stated that there was a Goods Shed at Canterbury Road (Wingham)! There was a branch into Hammill, same at Wingham Pit and Guilford. all these branches ever handled was the spoil from the shaft sinking. At Eythorne the spoil trains, from Guilford, ran up the Tilmanstone branch (propelled from Guilford) before running down hill toward Shepherds Well. I was told this by my Dads former Boss, Harold Evans (Chief Engineer at St Augustine's Hospital), whos Father was the engine driver for the Aerial Ropeway to Dover and remembered the trains as a child. He told me that there were branches built at Wingham and Hammill and even took Dad and I out in his Rover P4, this was the early 1970's, to show us the remains. The Triangular Junction would have been of use had the line been completed to Grove Ferry.

There are so many suppositions and legends about this line it boggles the mind. How I wish Mr Evans were still with us as he would answer 99% of the questions about the EKR, all I have is memories of being shewn this stuff as grassy banks in fields 40+ years ago with a 5 - 7 year olds attention span. I now know only one person who knew this line when it was a working line, he is in his mid 80's now, and his Father was a Loco Driver upon it and is in one of the famous pictures, the one at Canterbury Road (Wingham) with the young woman with the pram on the station. He is/was the baby in the pram......

S4 (calming down a bit (sorry)).
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Offline DS239

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2016, 14:22:41 »

Map-wise, see also this: http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=15&lat=51.2554&lon=1.2904&layers=10, which suggests that the EKLR had at least prepared for a triangular junction (not sure if I knew that).

Although nearby,the [planned] triangular junction was at Eastry, not Hammill,- the map shows the route fenced off,and I think there may have been some preliminary earthworks done,but track was never laid.

Offline Nemo

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2016, 14:04:56 »
One (2011) iteration of redevelopment proposals appears here: http://quinn-estates.com/commercial/downloads/quinn-estates-hammill-regeneration-submission.pdf.  This attributes the two long brick structures to EKLR locomotive maintenance sheds (hm) and says they are/were due to be refurbished.  Reference is also made to the "Story of Hammill Brick" by LC Poupard (presumably the Works Manager); how detailed it was I don't know, but t'internet says it crops up in Bygone Kent 1981 Vol. 12 No. 8.

Map-wise, see also this: http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=15&lat=51.2554&lon=1.2904&layers=10, which suggests that the EKLR had at least prepared for a triangular junction (not sure if I knew that).

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2016, 22:22:21 »
There are going to be 19 houses on that site. Some of these are timber frame, a timber Ikea build with a brick skin. I delivered five of them last year and the roofs last Winter. My last delivery was in early February and needed to be towed our by their site fork lift as I got well and truly stuck, almost to the chassis, in the mud. Moral of that is never believe a builder when he says the ground is firm. I should have got out and walked (swum, waded, struggled, delete as applicable) through the mud first. When I was there I was told the two building were to be retained. However I have my doubts.

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Offline DS239

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2016, 13:39:03 »
A view of the claypit to the north of the works in 1960.

Offline Trikeman

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2016, 21:06:38 »
Work has begun on clearing the old site at Hammill Brickworks / Woodnesborough Colliery. Hopefully the two brick buildings will survive, but what are the chances? Pictures taken Dec 2015
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seafordpete

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2010, 16:12:58 »
Ref  Squadron Leader Starr, why is his grave in an untidy state, even if his family do not bother with its upkeep. it would appear to be a standard War grave memorial which is subject to the war graves commision terms of duty.
Non standard ie family memorials are not looked after by them.

I commented to a cemetery worker in Brighton about a couple of CWGC graves and he told me that CWGC mow them twice a year, which is twice a year more than Brighton Council do the rest.

Roob Itself

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2010, 15:34:10 »
I think you`re, right detmould. I had heard that there were two test shafts that had been sunk to quite a substantial depth and are still open. Their uses now are nothing more then an open fish pond. You can see the two rings on google earth. Also when I lived in Eastry I had a telescopic sight and a clear view of Hammill Brick works and I could never understand why there was a small slag heap round the back of it.

Offline doug

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2010, 19:12:41 »
Ref  Squadron Leader Starr, why is his grave in an untidy state, even if his family do not bother with its upkeep. it would appear to be a standard War grave memorial which is subject to the war graves commision terms of duty.
Non standard ie family memorials are not looked after by them.

Offline Islesy

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2010, 14:26:59 »
From an article in "This is Wiltshire" by Katie Bond.

FORMER RAF serviceman Dan Gurney has been tending the neglected grave of a Swindon fallen hero for almost 30 years.

For three decades Mr Gurney has been a man on a mission as he has attempted to piece together the story of Battle of Britain pilot Squadron Leader Harold Starr, who was shot down and killed over the Kent countryside.
Mr Gurney, of Lydiard, is now preparing for the 70th anniversary of Sqn Ldr Starr's death.
"These kinds of things should not be forgotten," said Mr Gurney, who has marked the death every year since his quest began.
"I always try to put flowers down at the cenotaph on the anniversary of Harold's death, it is nothing big, just a personal tribute."
Sqn Ldr Starr, is buried in Radnor Street cemetery, was killed in action on August 3, 1940, in Kent, aged just 25.
He is one of only three pilots killed in the Battle of Britain to be buried in Wiltshire, which is what led to Mr Gurney's interest.
Sqn Ldr Starr had been leading a patrol and at 8.25am, when his Hurricane plane was shot down, he was seen parachuting to safety.
One of four circling ME 109 fighters opened fire on him as he hung helplessly in his parachute harness and his body was found at Hammill brickworks, near Eastry.
There was a bullet hole through his heart.
After discovering Sqn Ldr Starr was in fact the son of a Swindon hotel owner, Mr Gurney set about tracing his relatives to get permission to release his records in order for his research to progress.
He said: "I've spent nearly 30 years gathering this information and I don't want it to die with me when I die, so I have taken it to Swindon library and they have made a copy of it for their archive.
"I was pretty stunned when I first found out Harold was from Swindon, it took me more than three trips to find the grave and it was in such a terrible condition "I can't believe that was nearly 30 years ago. I spent two days cleaning it all up and I have had letters from his family saying I have managed to find out all this information that they didn't even know, so they were really pleased."
The engine of the Hurricane which Sqn Ldr Starr was flying is now in the Battle of Britain Museum, in Kent, and Mr Gurney has made several trips to the spot where the plane was shot down.
He says he would now like to make a trip to Dunkirk, where Sqn Ldr Starr's brother Norman is buried, to complete his quest.



Dan Gurney at the grave of Harold Starr in Radnor Street Cemetery
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Offline Islesy

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2010, 14:16:07 »
Had a good chat with the caretaker whilst I was there - as far as they are aware the main kiln is the original.
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Offline detmold

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2010, 14:03:12 »
Thank you for the interesting info. I was aware a mine shaft was sunk close by.
Fantastic photos appreciate you sharing them.
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Offline doug

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Re: Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2010, 13:51:27 »
Hammill brickworks is now closed and is being advertised for sale.

Offline Islesy

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Hammill Brick Works at Woodnesborough
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2010, 10:23:24 »
Hammill Brick occupies the site of the former Hammill (or Woodnesborough) Colliery. Construction was started in 1910 by Arthur Burr's Goodnestone & Woodnesborough Colliery Ltd, and an extensive range of surface buildings had been erected by 1911 including an engine house, workshops and a chimney.

No further work was to be undertaken until a branch from the East Kent Light Railway was completed, and by 1914 no sinking had yet started. At the outbreak of WW1, all further development of the site was halted for the duration of hostilities. Shortly after the war started the colliery was taken over by the Army for a cavalry re-
mount unit, a large number of horses being stabled in the colliery buildings.

Around this time Intermediate Equipments, the Holding Company, began to dispose of surface plant that had already been installed.

After the war, no further development was undertaken, but apart from the wooden headgear the surface buildings were still complete in 1923 when the mine was sold to Pearson & Dorman Long, owners of Betteshanger Colliery.

They kept the mineral rights and sold the colliery to the Hammill Brick Co. who built a brickworks on the site utilising some of the old colliery buildings, opening in June 1927.

Hammill Brick continued trading until 2006, when a downturn in fortunes lead to the site running down. Despite an attempt to revitalise the company, the brickworks shut in 2008 and has been run on a care & maintenance basis ever since in the hope of keeping the site viable for a buyer.

























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Offline detmold

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Hamil Brick works Woodnesborough
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2010, 09:41:58 »
I had an uncle who worked there as a moulder pre WW1. I would be grateful if anyone knows any history about the company. Old photos stories etc.

Regards

Detmold
I do not suffer from stress but I am a carrier!!

 

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