News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

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Author Topic: Richborough Port  (Read 52079 times)

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Lee

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #39 on: December 03, 2010, 19:08:38 »
Hi Ted,
Are the workshop pictures the same buildings that used to be on the prized site
Bsrgds,
Lee

Offline JohnG

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #38 on: December 03, 2010, 16:40:46 »
Many thanks Ted, a very interesting set of photgraphs, thakns for shareing them with us.
JohnG

Monkton Malc

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #37 on: December 02, 2010, 20:37:20 »
What a fantastic set of photos Ted. Thank you for sharing them with us.


MM

Offline Ted Ingham

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #36 on: December 02, 2010, 19:32:40 »
A few photos of Richborough Port during World War 1.
Regards,
Ted.



















Offline doug

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #35 on: November 12, 2010, 17:07:26 »
A Swing bridge was in place from shipyard No1 [Blood point] this took a rail track over to Shipyard No 2 which was on the other side of the river Stour, could probably also be used as access to Broadsalts Landing Ground.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #34 on: November 12, 2010, 16:43:40 »
An interesting feature on old maps is the bridge crossing the River Stour at Bloody Point.We used to see something looking like a small Bailey bridge crossing a ditch.This was situated near to the centre of a pasture so we couldn't understand it's purpose as the ditch was just a shallow scrape really.This was possibly used to carry the rail line shown in the map.I've got a larger scale plan somewhere of this area but maybe someone knows more about this feature?

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Richborough Port
« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2010, 08:19:42 »
                                                                                                            
Richborough Port in 1971.Photo taken from the other side of the River Stour.

philspain

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Richborough Port
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2010, 16:59:28 »
From the corner of a 1947'ish Borough of Ramsgate map. To see the full map follow http://ramsgatehistory.com/1950s_ramsgate_map.jpg


Guest

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Richborough Port
« Reply #31 on: October 21, 2010, 15:04:33 »
Can I barge in on this?
This was the train ferry berth a couple of years or so ago:



And this, now selling garden sheds, was apparently originally the Port's hospital:





The drawing of the train ferry below is from Shipping Wonders of the World which my father bought in the 1930s. I think he had to buy it in weekly(?) instalments and then pay a bit extra to have them bound into two volumes.


Offline TowerWill

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Richborough Port
« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2010, 22:07:51 »

This GE image shows what's left of two wooden barges in the salt marsh opposite the Port.

philspain

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Richborough Port
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2010, 22:25:15 »
Reading through Robert Butler's book Richborough Port I noticed that the Railway Gantry from Richborough was moved to Harwich in 1923 along with three of the train ferries. The gantry still exists and is a Listed Structure. See http://www.heritagegateway.org.uk/Gateway/Results_Single.aspx?uid=366518&resourceID=5
The gantry is also listed on page 79 of the Essex County Council Historic Buildings at Risk register. See htt
p://www.essexcc.gov.uk/vip8/ecc/ECCWebsite/content/binaries/documents/Planning396/BAR_2009_Tendring.pdf


Picture from RICHBOROUGH PORT by Robert Butler

Offline doug

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Richborough Port
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2010, 20:59:16 »
Barges used at Richborough during ww1 were mostly steel built and a lot larger than the ones seen on English canals, More like the Rhine barges that went up to 1,000 Tons. Have never seen any reference to timber barges beeing used,although most of my information is on the constuction of Port Richborough rather than its operation.The buildings mentioned earlier in this section, near to the site used by Eagle sheds, was the site of the quarters for female medical staff, the area was surrounded by a wall, the houses sited to the back of the shed company, formed part of a stables used for a change of horses for the Waldershere park estate, between Estuary and Dover.
The large building running parallel with the road in Towerwill aerial photo was the motor transport section, in the 1950s this was a shuttlecock factory, to the left of this building was Haffendens, the shed factory would be to the right of this, The buildings on the other side of the road were used by Petbows who made generators.

Offline TowerWill

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Richborough Port
« Reply #27 on: August 10, 2010, 17:05:22 »

Another photo from "KENT AND THE CINQUE PORTS", this one taken near the lake at Stonar.I believe Richborough Port extended out to here.

Offline Islesy

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Richborough Port
« Reply #26 on: August 10, 2010, 10:36:53 »
For many years there used to be what everyone thought was a water tank perched high on a post alongside the road somewhere between the power station and Pfizers. Apparently it was in fact a transformer used within the port, and was promised to Ramsgate Maritime Museum by Pfizer when they carried out work in the area. Unfortunately it never reached the museum, but may be kicking around somewhere. I believe the Ramsgate Maritime Museum holds quite a bit on the port. The problem here is that it's currently shut pending discussions with the local authority.

That would be the Wurtz Lightening Arrester - it was donated to the Amberley Chalk Pit Museum in Sussex.
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Offline TowerWill

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Richborough Port
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2010, 07:57:35 »
Just had a look on G.E. and i can make out the bows of one barge sticking up above the saltings and what looks like some bits of the other one next to it.The ravages of time and all that are certainly having an effect there.They were mainly of wood construction but if they were used in WW1 for cross Channel transport or just local river work i wouldn't know.They had to have been left there after WW1 as that area was dredged out to widen the river.

 

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