News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: The Ringlestone Arms [i]  (Read 19105 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline AlanH

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Appreciation 27
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2011, 09:25:23 »
Nice to see someone stand up for the old girls. I think the shotgun was just an empty threat but it worked and if it was pointed at you it was most likely because of your own behaviour.
I thought it was a nice quiet pub in the 60s and only once got on their wrong side through no real fault of my own except a wrong turn when going back into the bar.
At least the yobs generally kept away from the place.  :)
AlanH.

manokent

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2011, 08:22:11 »
I used the Ringlestone Arms for some time. All that is written is true. However to set the record straight: they may have been eccentric and much derided but they managed a pub near an airfield (W.Malling?) during the war and nothing was too much trouble for the young aircrews. Nothing was ever written about the good they did for the lads in the Battle of Britain. They may have been odd but they deserved a medal!

sparrowmuscles

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2011, 00:02:03 »
I served them a couple of times when I worked in Chiesmans, one carried the cheque book but the other one signed it very shakily, I had to write in the amounts etc as they were too shakey to write it themselves
I met my wife Barbara whilst we both worked in Chiesmans in 1964 she was in shoes and I was in carpets. Still together!
The Ringlestone arms was a Fremlins house at one time as my Day had to deliver water as there was no mains laid on. Early 1950's

Online DaveTheTrain

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 316
  • Appreciation 18
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #24 on: July 11, 2011, 20:42:07 »
You may be interested to know that there is a family connection back to the Gaskings again, I take clients in there reasonably regularly and the landlandy has press cuttings from the 1960s on the wall, as we were chatting about them she told me she was the (IIRC) the grandaughter of Dora.

Very nice food, and definitely no guns now.

SA

eavyumble

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #23 on: July 11, 2011, 10:55:26 »


Postcard picked up at a boot fair yeasterday showing the Long Bar at the Ringlestone

patmore

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2011, 14:59:04 »
Florence and Dora Gasking - mother and daughter not sisters - took over the Inn in 1958. Wikipedia

Offline Leofwine

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2392
  • Appreciation 355
  • Today is only yesterday's tomorrow
    • Brompton History Research Group
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2011, 13:59:30 »
Regarding the Ringlestone I have memories of the place from various scout hikes that included illicit forays into licensed premises.I seem to remember that the two old ladies were sisters and that there was no electric used in the place all lights being oil lamps.I remember knocking on the door one time,the bolts were drawn,and I found myself peering down the barrels of the shotgun through the crack in the door,needless to say I failed to gain entry that time.The place is definitely still open as this link shows

http://www.theringlestoneinn.co.uk/

Looking at that link it would seem that the inn is a little more 'outsider friendly' now!

I think it has been a more accessible place for a while now. Back in the 1990s and early 2000s there was a potter in Rochester who made replica historic pottery for me, but one of her regular clients was the Ringlestone Inn who had their own plates, mugs, etc made for their restaurant, and that doesn't sound like something the two old girls mentioned in much of the thread would have done!
=========
Brompton History Research Group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1891788967775575/

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 946
  • Appreciation 68
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2011, 06:52:23 »
Aways rememberer the shotgun stories going back to the 60s cant say I ever saw the gun myself. Went there a few times door always locked had to knock only ever allowed in once found it a dark dingy place no atmosphere think everyone was scared of the old girls,

patmore

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2011, 04:23:59 »
Sentinel S4, exactly the same thing happened to me once at the Robin Hood, went back by car and stood at the bar 'talking motorbikes' all evening.

Offline Sentinel S4

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1932
  • Appreciation 165
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2011, 17:17:26 »
Went there twice in the early 80's. First time a bunch of us turned up on motobikes and got barred, so we went back the next day in a car and got served. I have never been back since as when we pointed out what we had done ............ we got barred again. Doh........
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

patmore

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2011, 15:37:37 »
When I last visited the Ringlestone (which was some time ago) there was a chart on display which listed all previous landlords and ladies dating back to the 17th century

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 994
  • Appreciation 74
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2011, 13:34:36 »
Regarding the Ringlestone I have memories of the place from various scout hikes that included illicit forays into licensed premises.I seem to remember that the two old ladies were sisters and that there was no electric used in the place all lights being oil lamps.I remember knocking on the door one time,the bolts were drawn,and I found myself peering down the barrels of the shotgun through the crack in the door,needless to say I failed to gain entry that time.The place is definitely still open as this link shows

http://www.theringlestoneinn.co.uk/
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Minsterboy

  • Guest
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2011, 12:43:36 »
I also recall, when I used to use it in the late 1980's - early 1990's that many of the chairs were of the junior school type, which having squeezed in to you normally ended up taking to the bar with you stuck to your hips.
They used to serve a great range of Real Ales straight from the barrels as well.

Offline scintilla

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 88
  • Appreciation 17
    • Kenticisms
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2011, 11:53:44 »
I also visited several times in the 80's. When we had a hockey game in that particular part of Kent it was a must to drop in for a pint or two. As Barrowboy says I think the old ladies were long gone by then.

Offline Barrowboy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
  • Appreciation 1
Re: The Ringlestone Arms [i]
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2011, 10:30:26 »
I visited several times in the 1980's. No sign of the old ladies then but the pub was still odd. Peanut shucks were thrown around the floor so that customers made a crunching noise as they walked to the bar. Sold an impresive range of English fruit wines - which my good lady got sozzelled on. Most difficult part was trying to find the dam place. I have approached from both Sittingbourne and Harrietsham and it was always hit or miss whether I found the place.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines