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Author Topic: Goodwin Sands  (Read 40256 times)

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Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2011, 17:43:31 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2011, 17:43:00 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2011, 17:42:28 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2011, 17:40:55 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2011, 17:40:26 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2011, 17:39:43 »
And some of the second trip a year later, in roughly the same place. You can see how it has changed.


Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2011, 17:03:23 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2011, 17:02:48 »

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2011, 17:02:04 »
Dug out some pics from my first trip in 1992 (I think)


Offline CELOCANT

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2011, 11:33:32 »
In the days of the Earl of Godwine it was rumoured the sands were joined to the land and a great flood separated them. Could this have been caused by a tsunami following an earthquake or just a vast tidal surge from a violent northerly storm in the North Sea? Possible the latter, as I have never read of an earthquake from that time.
A living fossil

busyglen

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2011, 19:00:02 »
There's some earlier information that I came across here, if you haven't already seen it.


http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9019.0   Post #5

Offline Paul

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2011, 13:22:22 »
Quote Celocant:
"‘The Sands can appear safe but, if landing, very careful consideration must be given to tides, the weather forecast and the prevailing conditions. The Goodwin Sands should be treated with the utmost respect by visitors’ "     

Better still, Stay off the sands unless you are with an authorised person with a Marine Radio.
As Cellphones may not work if you get in trouble.. :(
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Alastair

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2011, 12:35:11 »
I was there when the film crew was. On the two occasions I went we landed in roughly the same place, having passed the wreck of the 'Luray Victory', and I was amazed at how the sands had changed. The second time there was a lifeboat davit sticking out of the sand and the whole configuration was different.

Offline mmitch

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2011, 11:08:21 »
Did one of the lightships there capsize once? Possibly in the 1950s.  If so was it recovered?
mmitch

Offline CELOCANT

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Re: Goodwin Sands
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2011, 10:31:24 »
The hovercraft provided a great safe service for those who wanted to visit the Sands. I think it was £18 per person. I pity the cleaners who had hoover up all the sand left by the passengers on board.

On the northern part of the Goodwins the sand lies exposed at low water, and all about the sandbank are ‘swillies’ or deep holes that remain filled with seawater. Elsewhere gullies and mini sand dunes are formed which will start to crumble beneath your feet; and when you try to paddle in the ‘fox-holes’ or the puddles… it is then that you feel the suction of quick sand. Nevertheless, this situation gives little fear to the supposed colony of 350 seals, however, in the past it has given cause for much concern and grievance to humans. 
   
The desire to do the unusual has always held a fascination for some, and to visit the Goodwin Sands as a fun-day out is no exception. They have been visited by thousands over the years for various reasons, and still attract the curious.

Annual cricket matches on the Goodwin Sands are irregular. The first recorded game was in the summer of 1813, which caused criticism from the public as a blasphemy against all those unfortunate victims of the rapacious Sands. During 1985, this author assisted in ferrying players and spectators from the Kent team for a fundraising match on top of the Goodwins. Thirteen Deal boats took out around a hundred people on a calm and sunny afternoon. Since that event, cricket, amongst other games, have only been played by a few whilst on the occasional organised trips.

Although the large hovercrafts are no longer available to take up to 355 sightseers out to the sandbank at a time – the Goodwin Sands Potholing Club has found another way. This club, a charity formed in 1977, which raises money for young people, prearranged a trip to the Sands on 19th August, 2009. The use of two small helicopters were hired and the fare paying passengers ferried out, and back, on the hottest day of the year, enjoying the evening’s low tide ramble on the Sands.

In July 2006, the BBC film crew who were making the well known television programme ‘Coast’ thought it would be a good idea to feature a cricket match being played upon the Sands. As the tide started to make, the skipper of the craft who took them out urged that they should evacuate with haste. The TV crew pleaded for another ten minutes to finish the take. That was all it took – the tide changed against a north-east wind and the surf built up and swamped the vessel and its outboard engines. Several thousand pounds of film cameras were washing about in the bilge of the disabled boat and the occupants were at risk of being stranded. It took two lifeboats from Ramsgate and Walmer, plus the rescue helicopter, to avert a tragedy. Coastguard sector manager Andy Roberts summed up the situation by stating:

‘The Sands can appear safe but, if landing, very careful consideration must be given to tides, the weather forecast and the prevailing conditions. The Goodwin Sands should be treated with the utmost respect by visitors’     

This advice, unfortunately, has not always been observed … and sometimes ventures have led to grief and misfortune.



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