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Author Topic: Nashenden Valley  (Read 9240 times)

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blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2011, 21:41:27 »
We don't really notice the noise to be honest, if you are out on the road by the train track then there can be quite a bit of noise but appart from that it it nice and quite.

Offline AlanH

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2011, 10:53:33 »
Do you get much noise from the M2 or railway there Blackmafia? Reason I ask is both my brothers are in the UK at the moment looking at rural properties and as we were bought up not far away, they may be interested.
Cheers.
Alan.

blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2011, 07:53:34 »
Upper Nashenden farm was originaly built as two copicers cottages by the Rochester Bridge wardens in 1830, by 1901 it was reclassified as a farm and renamed Upper Nashenden farm at this time we beleive that it was turned into one cottage and leased to the Borstal institute as used as a live stock farm, comming into present day it was compulsery purchesed by the CTRL for the high speed rail network and only resently bought at auction an then only three years ago bought by myself.

blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2011, 07:47:33 »
For any one interested Upper Nashenden farm, Stony lane, Rochester is up for sale 499,500.00. It is set in one arce of land, comprising of the main cottage, Wooden out building (Granny flat), 25'x25' workshop, big vegatable patch, hardcored area for vehicles up to 32 tonne, big paddock area which is currently used for Water fowl, In the cottage all windows are double glazed, gch + wood/coal burning stove with back boiler, massive fitted kitchen, massive living room, massive dinning room, study and down stairs bathroom, upstairs are three bedrooms and a big shower room/bathroom and walk in wardrobe. it is on sale with Your Move Rochester.

blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2011, 07:33:59 »
Thanks Rossco that is differant pdf. than i had found, I don't suppose anybody has any photo's of the area at all? as i'm trying to renovate the cottage and would like a guide to go by.

rossco

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2011, 13:03:36 »

seafordpete

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2011, 09:59:34 »
Small saw mills are probably the guys who do coppicing, usually just a bench and  a circular saw, there is not  enough substantial timber there to build one proper mill never mind several

blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2011, 07:49:17 »
I have recently spoken to a dog walker who was telling me that the woods around here were littered with small saw mills or something of that description. I knew that was the reason the house was built initually but he was talking about the 50's and 60's and at this time the house was part of a farm. Walking in the direction that he stated in to Bridge woods i found old vehicle tracks and a large ammount of old lorry tyres? but that was about it.

seafordpete

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2011, 11:05:55 »
Sorry know nothing else, suggest the range was orginally for Fort Bridgewood as it fires directly onto the bank (now M2/CTRL) below.

blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2011, 19:22:37 »
Thank you very much that is a very good mapping tool to play with, do you know much about the farm at all?, through a bit of digging i have found out that it was built by the Rochester Bridge wardens in 1830 as two wood cutter cottages and named Bridge wood cottages (suprisinly there was a lot of Bridgewood cottages around this area) and in 1900 in was sold or leased to the borstal institute and re named Upper Nashenden farm, i don't know if this is when it became one cottage or not ?

seafordpete

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2011, 18:13:15 »
Guessing trenches were in Monks wood. Range and modern maps on this link http://wtp2.appspot.com/wheresthepath.htm?lat=51.35602443127541&lon=0.48949378342299404&gz=14&oz=9&gt=5  at the top of the OS map is a drop down showing OS +1930sOS, click on this allows the map to be changed to sat photo, current OS or 1940os. These weren't Auxillary hides but normal fire trenches

blackmafia

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2011, 19:45:44 »
Thank you for your responce seaford Pete, if you do a google seach on Borstal Rifle range it comes up with a pdf explaining the range boundries and rough position of a range hut, i went walking that way yesterday and the said boundries are in a natural re-enterant which would make a perfect rifle range.
         I don't suppose you know the where abouts of any of the trenches do you, i am intrested after seeing a program on the secret army of WW2 in which it told about secret bunkers being made around wooded areas and farm steads in case of German invaision.

seafordpete

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Re: Nashenden Valley
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2011, 10:01:50 »
There were a lot of trenches in the woods there in the 1950s but don't recall ever seeing a range in the area

blackmafia

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Nashenden Valley
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2011, 21:26:45 »
I have recently looked at pre war maps of the Nashenden Valley and noticed that the ten acre strip of arrible land behind Upper Nashenden farm only materialized after 1939 was this possibly due to the out set of WW2? Also i have found panflets of a rifle range inbetween Nine acre wood and Monk wood did this range actually exist as i can find no evidance other than this panflet, and finally has any one got any pictures or information and stories about Upper Nashenden farm wether war or peace time location of bunkers would be nice.

Thank you for your time

 

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