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Author Topic: Luton Village 1909  (Read 17132 times)

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patmore

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2011, 13:03:26 »
The following text is taken from the leaflet 'The Windmills of Luton' by Jim Logan and I suppose should be posted in 'Windmills' but as it is a continuation of this thread I've posted it here.
                        Thomas Mainwaring worked Luton Mill for 36 years until his death in 1848 when his son William took over for a year but the mill was then rented to Mr. William Burgess. It was during his time that the mill was destroyed by fire.
                        In September 1887 the mill had been working hard all day in strong winds. It is thought that the iron axle from the sails overheated due to friction and set fire to surrounding woodwork. As the fire started at the top of the mill it was impossible to get water to it. the miller and his neighbours had to watch helplessly as the fire took hold. they threw water over the miller's house and adjoining outbuildings to prevent them being set alight by sparks or the pieces of burning timber as they fell from the mill.
                         A member of the Chatham Fire Brigade who happened to be riding along Luton Road spotted the fire. Stopping only to alert the Luton firemen he galloped to Chatham and twenty minutes later the Chatham fire engine pulled by two large horses thundered through Luton heading for the fire. The tar covered wooden building burnt fiercely. By the time the brigade arrived the top of the mill including the remains of the sails had crashed to the ground scattering burning debris. The base of the mill was like a furnace and the millstones could be seen glowing white hot within.
                         The mill was beyond saving so the Fire Brigade concentrated on preventing the fire from spreading, pulling down outbuildings close to the mill and pumping water from the well over nearby cottages. When these houses were safe the Fire Brigade worked to douse the mill and, more than four hours after the fire started, it was under control. The operation which involved 14 firemen cost the fire brigade 10 and two officers                      
sutained minor injuries. Although the mill had been insured it was never replaced.

             One or two dates differ to other info I've found but at least we now know the fate of the mill.
                                                                                                                              James

patmore

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2011, 14:03:12 »

A map of the area from about 1962, Crestway the first of the roads along the ridge of the hill, being built starting from the Luton end a year or two later. The 'Tank',centre picture, would be on the site in question, I do not know for sure but I suspect this may have been at or below ground level. As a young lad my friends and I would walk to school (Fort Luton) from Pheasant Road up and along the Daisey Banks, which are slightly higher than the Crestway/Downsview hill. Prior to the housing development the land was all cornfield and in the summers we could sometimes see a harvester as it worked on the ridge of the hill. I cannot be absolutely certain but I am reasonably sure there were no buildings or ruins visible on the mill site then. Mill Lane,,which at the date of this map was developed ended just short of the 'drain' and continues as a footpath perhaps this once would have been a cart track to the mill
                                                          James
                                             

Offline numanfan

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2011, 08:26:01 »
in 1887,Luton Mill burned down.

Well done patmore :) Another mystery solved.

Mill House obviously retained the name long after the actual windmill was no more, I wonder if those buildings stayed until the Settington Estate was built?

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patmore

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2011, 05:37:51 »
If I may take this topic back to Numanfans original question about Luton Mill/Mill House simple search on various 'Old Windmill' sites has produced some answers. It would appear that Luton Mill,also known as Mainwarings Mill,was a smock mill bought by Thomas Mainwaring when it was moved to Luton from Slough in 1848. It was run by Thomas (and for one year only) William Mainwaring, the two owning or managing a further 6 mills in Kent at the time including one at Frinsbury and one at Strood Hill. Thomas, who was a miller by trade, worked Luton Mill until his death in 1884. I can find no information as to who,if anyone,succeeded him but 3 years later,in 1887,Luton Mill burned down. Further to this a George Mainwaring was miller at Upberry Mill,Chatham,previously known as Gilberts Mill,in 1834.
                                                                                    James

Offline numanfan

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2011, 13:56:29 »
Numanfan,are you sure that photo is from 1920?                                                                                                                                

That's the full photo, unfortunately. The caption with it definitely quotes 1920.
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patmore

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2011, 05:23:27 »
Numanfan,are you sure that photo is from 1920? It looks like another part of the photo I mentioned earlier from 1905, although mine is not as clear.Do you have the rest of it? Just as a point of interest Sid Turner the local archaeologist and I believe, discoverer of the Upnor elephant, lived in one of the large houses in Nelson Terrace in the centre of your picture just to the left of the Hen and Chicks.
                                                                 
;                                                                James

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2011, 21:23:07 »
I noticed on the 1832 map posted in the New Brompton map there was an 'oil mill' and that looked to be a collection of small to medium buildings that may well have looked like farm buildings.  It also made me wonder what kind of oil it was, presumably some kind of vegetable oil to need a mill.
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patmore

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2011, 14:53:34 »

 This picture from 1905 is worth close study. Mill lane can clearly be seen and what looks like the end of a building at the top of the lane. To the right of Mill Lane there are definitely some sort of workings. To the extreme left is what looks to me like a windmill. I remember as a small boy in the mid 50s going to the top of Mill Lane with my parents and having to open a gate to pass into the fields beyond.
   The brickfield,or where it had been, can be seen behind the larger of the tram depot buildings, on the site now occupied by the Second Avenue industrial estate, the present day allotments being where the fields are beside Street End Road. The large house just to the right of the chimney was still there when I was very young, standing opposite where the bottom of Third Avenue is now.
   It must be born in mind that distance and perspective are distorted in this photo, being part of a much wider 'panned' picture which was once on display in the Waggon at Hale pub. How I would love to own that picture today !
                                                                                                          James

Offline Stewie

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2011, 14:27:21 »
Peterchall

The footpath from Downsview to Hopwell Drive actually goes via Shanklin Close. There was a patch of waste land at the end of Shanklin Close but this has now been cleared and fenced off pending the building of 'Luxury' housing units.
However, your map would put Mill House on the Hopewell Drive Industrial Estate and thus long gone. I don't recall seeing anything along this road that looks older than the 1960's.

seafordpete

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2011, 13:56:03 »
1869 OS shows "clay pits" at Stonecross Fm and "Luton Brickfields" including  clay mills at Pheasant Fm

Offline swiftone

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2011, 13:36:11 »
I would guess that the tramway was to do with the old gravel pit. Mill House was part of Luton Corn Mill but seems to have disappeared after WW2 when the area was redeveloped.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2011, 12:46:40 »
I've overlaid what I THINK are the locations of the present day roads, except that I originally mis-placed Hopewell Drive, and I think Shanklin Close is a bit further down towards the bottom left of the map
                                           
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seafordpete

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2011, 12:07:14 »
Probably a tramway in the sense of small wagons from a quarry to works or similiar-think of colliery tubs

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Luton Village 1909
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2011, 11:15:12 »
My son used to live in Downsview 3rd one in from Mill Lane and I wouldn't say there's anything at all left of any remains of Mill House, it's all tightly packed houses there now, and at the back of those , there's another rd before Hopewell Drive, so it's long gone.
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Offline numanfan

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Luton Village 1909
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2011, 22:14:44 »
I've purchased a map of Luton Village, 1909, and there are a few queries that I'm hoping can be answered.

Here's a section of the map. The tramway depot in Luton Road is top right of the map, directly below is Pheasant Farm, then Stonecross Farm. In between the farms is what would become Street End Road.


My question is - why would a small section of tramway run between the two farms? It's quite clearly marked, but it isn't linked to the main line in the village.

The next section of map is a little bit lower, still showing Street End Road and the Brick Works


Does anyone know about Mill House (lower left). It is situated in what is now the Settington Estate. There is a Mill Lane on the present day estate, but I would guess Mill House would be in the Downsview area. I'm pretty sure it's long gone, but are there any remains, or any sign that it ever existed?


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