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Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
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Author Topic: Mystery field marks on Tolsford Hill- any ideas?  (Read 6394 times)

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Offline unfairytale

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Mystery field marks on Tolsford Hill- any ideas?
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2010, 23:00:34 »
Great detective work Islesy. That second photo is fantastic!
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Offline Islesy

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Mystery field marks on Tolsford Hill- any ideas?
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2010, 11:47:35 »
Glad to be of some help Andy C.
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Andy C

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Mystery field marks on Tolsford Hill- any ideas?
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2010, 10:16:25 »
Excellent addition to the thread and filled in some more detail in my great grandfathers past. He was in the 12th Reserve Training Battalion and would have trained many of the Canadians who passed through Shorncliffe before he went to France in 1917. There were as many as 40-50,000 Canadian troops in the Folkestone area at any one time and it was dubbed a suburb of Toronto. Anyone interested in the CEF in general should head on over to the Canadian Archives website who have many war diaries online. If you had a relative they also have online versions of their attestation papers (front and back in most cases) and you can order a copy of their service records though this is not cheap. A site I would recommend for the CEF at Shorncliffe is this one:

http://www3.nfb.ca/ww1/wartime.php

Which has some excellent images of Canadians at Shorncliffe. I would be interested if anyone knows the location of the memorial.

Offline Islesy

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Mystery field marks on Tolsford Hill- any ideas?
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2010, 21:59:06 »
These would be the chaps that made those trenches,


(photos from the website of the 21st Battalion CEF)

Tolsford Hill is behind Beachborough House, which was used as a Military hospital by the Canadians during the First World War. The hospital was operated and maintained by the Canadian War Contingents Association and opened in October 1914. An offer was made to the Army Council, through Queen Mary to maintain a hospital in connection with shorncliffe camp. Her Majesty has always taken a keen interest in the care of the wounded. The offer was accepted and the house and grounds at Beachborough Park were lent by the late Sir Arthur Markham MP. The officers, matrons, nurses and V.A.D's were all Canadians. About 3,000 soldiers passed through the wards with only 30 deaths. Beachborough was the only Canadian hospital in the United Kingdom supported by voluntry funds and open to all the wounded soldiers of His Majestys Dominions. The Hospital closed in early 1919.



The area was dominated by Canadian troops in WW1, based at Shorncliffe, East and West Sandling Camps. The original Sandling camp, built by McAlpine and Sons of Glasgow in October 1914 and auctioned off in September 1919, was of wooden huts and was built to house 8 battalions of the CEF who would carry out their training here before moving on to France. The 21st Battalion CEF went to West Sandling Camp upon arrival in England, and they made many references to their training on Tolsford Hill and marching back and forth morning and night in various letters, and the War Diary (excerpts here: http://18thbattalioncef.wordpress.com/).

Located close by is a Memorial Cross, which I have yet to locate.



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neil clark

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Mystery field marks on Tolsford Hill- any ideas?
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2009, 13:14:08 »
I was involved with English Heritage and a few other organisations and agencies with the Barham practice trenches. I wonder if these government departments know about these trenches near Tolsford Hill?????

 

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