News: In June 1557 Edmund Allin, his wife and five others were burnt at the stake, where Drakes pub now stands in Fairmeadow, Maidstone, for refusing to accept Catholicism.
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: Warden Chain Home Low Station  (Read 22056 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Re: Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2011, 14:09:33 »
Found this 1966 map showing the orientation of the OP/Radar at Warden.. Strange it doesn't show the other buildings, They were there then?

Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2010, 21:07:57 »
I found this Drawing.



It looks like Warden Point?
There used to be small wooden posts at Warden as in the pic and it looks like Whitstable in the background.
Also the building layout looks the same.

It could be generic as i dont think Warden had a gantry but it could have had one?
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2009, 10:42:25 »
This was about 71/72.
Its the Main building broken in half.
You can just see the top of the OP (by the trees) in situ  :)

Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7429
  • Appreciation 421
    • Sheppey History
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2009, 16:14:11 »
Tiny bit more info, the buildings started slipping down the cliff in 1971.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7429
  • Appreciation 421
    • Sheppey History
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2009, 08:33:36 »
Yup, you can see the buildings in the water there.

Also along to the left you can see the remains of the soundmirror lying on the beach.

Offline Trikeman

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 185
  • Appreciation 26
  • History from above
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2009, 23:51:55 »
I think this is the spot - just to the right of the caravans - of course, a lot of the site had been eroded, I guess the 3 pillboxes would have been on or near the site. Can you confirm this is the right spot or was it a bit further along? I've got more pics along the coast. There ia a brick building with a modern mast in next field, but I doubt if there is any connection. Picture was taken in 2005
Trikeman

Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2008, 22:04:54 »
The yellow line is the cliff edge now :(

Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7429
  • Appreciation 421
    • Sheppey History
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2008, 12:39:05 »







Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2008, 13:11:17 »
An e-mail I recived from RAF Air Defence Radar Museum after an enquiry I made.


"Thanks for your E-mail on the above subject at Warden Point.    
The site was chosen for an Army coast defence (CD) radar in early 1941, to reinforce the radar defences against the expected German seaborne invasion.    
The Royal Air Force had already adapted some of the Army radar once the equipment had demonstrated that it could detect low-flying aircraft as well as ships.    
The title CHL was added to the radars acquired by the RAF, they then being known as CD/CHL stations.  By the autumn of 1940 the Army had identified 135 CD sites covering possible invasion beaches, and gave them the "M" prefix which became standard for the 1.5 metre CD/CHL sites.  Not all of the 135 sites found by the end of 1940 were intended for immediate development, only 90 were considered for immediate construction, with the highest priority being given to those sites facing the enemy, M1 ? M16 on the south coast.  
With a manning state of 23 men (including 9 guards) per site these 16 sites were commissioned before May 1941.

By the end of 1942 the RAF had taken over the responsibility for coast watching radars and used some of the CD sites to fill gaps in its own schedule of CHL stations, with the result that only 38 of the CD ?M? sites would need to be completed.  
By the end of May 1941 Warden Point (M69) was under construction.  
However, by 1 November 1941 none of the CD stations listed as Temporary status (including Warden Point) were operating and for various reasons it was unlikely that any of them were actually provided with radars.

By 1942 the RAF inventory of radars took on a new turn when centimetric equipments became available, of better performance than the previous metric radars.   The line up for CD/CHL  sites was the 16 operational on the south coast (M1 - M16), a further ten planned for Triple Service developments, and 34 sites in the former army chain apparently in limbo.

In short, it looks like Warden Point was put under construction but never finished.  "


So warden Point may never have been Active :-[
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7429
  • Appreciation 421
    • Sheppey History
Warden Chain Home Low Station
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2008, 17:18:27 »
Here are some pics from the sound mirror and of the pillboxes














 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines