News: In 1834 a 13 metre long Iguanadon fossil was found in Queen’s Road in Maidstone
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Malaria and Cholera  (Read 15514 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

ellenkate

  • Guest
Re: Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2013, 09:52:35 »
CHOLERA:   1831  refusal to provide a place for the reception of patients  (page 493, Dover St Mary Vestry book U3/30  8/4)

CHOLERA:  Burials  5 Sep 1849  Daniel DAWKINS aged 46, and on same day Ann DAWKINS aged 45, also Margaret CASTLE on 9 Sept 1849 aged 40 
(Buckland by Dover regr U3/112/1/18)

Mr DAVEY medical officer Walmer District, supplied advice and medicine to 159 poor persons (not paupers) for Cholera and Diarrhoea.  14.11.1854.
(Eastry Union records)

ellenkate

  • Guest
Re: Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2011, 18:31:22 »

Old treatment for Cholera:

One of them was quinine. It is contained in tonic water, which made gin and tonic so refreshing to those in colonial Africa.

Before the isolation of quinine, powdered Peruvian Bark, isolated from Cinchona trees, was used to treat patients with malaria. Quinine was isolated from the bark in 1817, and a synthetic form is now used.

In the mid 1700s, willow bark was noted to have an effect against malaria. While willow bark did not cure the disease, it reduced the fever, pain, and fatigue of patients with malaria. The active compound in the bark was salicin, a compound that is related to aspirin.

(wiki)

merc

  • Guest
Re: Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2011, 22:43:27 »
August 2, 1849

Chatham

Several cases of cholera have appeared in this town. Three or four cases are reported to be in the Medway Union, two deaths have taken place. In Red Cat Lane, near the church, a dirty filthy place (The lane not the church), and the houses principally inhabited by soldiers wives and famillies, with four or five famillies in each, the cholera has made its appearance, and two of the soldiers wives were removed to Fort Pitt, but they both died a few hours later. The military authorities caused all the famillies to be moved out immediatly into rooms in the barracks. The houses in the lane are being limewashed outside and in, and sentries have been placed to stop soldiers entering the lane. A garrison order was read to the troops on parade cautioning them from going to certain parts of the town.

From The Morning Chronicle.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Appreciation 238
Re: Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2010, 18:23:09 »
Cholera and typhoid fever in Kent, a paper by Christopher Collins.
http://www.kentarchaeology.ac/authors/004.pdf

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7431
  • Appreciation 409
    • Sheppey History
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2010, 16:22:32 »
14th August 1849

Cholera - Chatham

We are sorry to say that the pestilence, which is proving so fatal in different parts of the country, has within the last few days made its appearance in various districts of this borough.  Upwards of 30 cases were reported yesterday to the authorities.  This malignant disease is at present confined to the ill sewered portions of the town, such as lanes and alleys, where filth of every kind is allowed to accumulate, creating a monster nuisance to passengers and to the inmates of those closely packed and ill ventilated dwellings, inhabited in these localities by the poorest classes.

In the neighbourhood of Hogg Lane four deaths of decided Asiatic Cholera were announced yesterday, and it is expected that as many more will be names this day.  All the furniture and bedding of the dwellings in which deaths have occurred have been removed and placed in an open piece of ground abutting on the New-road for the air to purify, and the houses are being lime-washed inside and out.

Merv

  • Guest
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2010, 14:45:48 »
They were spraying the Isle of Grain in very recent years to kill the Mozzies that cause Malaria, bought it by the Tankers from foriegn parts

seafordpete

  • Guest
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2010, 10:10:42 »
I have a death cert of my GGGF who died of cholera in London in 1848, on it is written "17 hours" which apparently was the time from symptoms showing until death!

ellenkate

  • Guest
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2010, 19:29:38 »

Smoking out the Cholera!
?Some professional gentleman from Inverness, having occasion to visit Cromerty last week was seized at the entrance of the town and told they must go to be ?Smoked? for the Cholera as they came from Inverness.   They were accordingly conveyed to the seaside, until they arrived at a wooden shed, where they were obliged to take off part of their clothes, wash themselves with a preparation of chloride of lime and then enter a place strongly impregnated with sulphur and other ingredients, where they were locked up until half suffocated.   Having undergone this salutary and rational process, the Inverness
ians were allowed to dress and depart. -  Inverness Courier ?   (reported in the Kentish Gazette Oct 5 1832 p.3 col.1)

Cholera in E.Kent:
Mr RIGDEN and Mr SLADDEN the Relieving Officers, sent a letter requesting an increase in their salaries in consequence of the high price of provisions and were informed that during the year 1854, the R.O. at Ramsgate was paid ?25 and at Margate ?10 after the Cholera visitation there and that the R.O. of Bridge Union was paid ?15 for his extra trouble and attention to nuisance cases.  The board deemed it inexpedient to make any alteration in the salaries.   However, it was proposed by E.R.RICE Esq. and seconded by Sir Brook BRIDGES and agreed that, subject to the approval of Poor Law Board, a gratuity of ?10 be presented to each of the R.Os. in consequence of extra duties performed by them on the visitation of cholera during the last year.  24 Dec 1855 (Eastry Workhouse ? guardians minutes)

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7431
  • Appreciation 409
    • Sheppey History
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2008, 19:31:15 »
22 Dec 1710 - First Quarantine Act of Parliament; mainly as a result of plague in the Baltic. Ship from Baltic to spend 40 days in Quarantine at Stangate and Sharpfleet Creeks. 

13 Jan 1712 - HARE, sloop, captured in 1709, ordered to Stangate Creek, to enforce quarantine regulations there.

01 Nov 1713 - ARUNDELL (1695), 5th rate, ordered to Stangate Creek to enforce quarantine, but not to approach the merchant ships; over 100 moored in creek.


Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7431
  • Appreciation 409
    • Sheppey History
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2008, 20:39:21 »
I'd love to go out there and have a poke around!  But victims of the plague were buried there too...... :o

Zowen

  • Guest
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2008, 09:53:07 »
Cool. I was always fascinated by Dead Mans Island.


Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7431
  • Appreciation 409
    • Sheppey History
Malaria and Cholera
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2008, 19:06:42 »
Pandemic years      epidemic years in Britain
1826-1838      1826-1838
1846-1854      1848-1849
1863-1868      1853-1854
                    1865-1866


It is believed Cholera was established on the Isle Of Sheppey in the warships anchored off Sheerness and Queenborough in 1931.  The hulks were used to house convicts at the time, they lived in cramped dirty conditions and the disease spread rapidly.  

The island had already suffered with Yellow Fever and the Plague in the past due to Stangate Creek being the quarantine station of the Naval Authorities, this was next to Burntwick Island in the River Medway, there was usually two huls stationed here used as prison ships for quarantined patients.  

Sunderland had the first victims of Cholera in this country and due to this the quarantined boats were sent to Stangate Creek,  it soon became very crowded in this area with all letters from the crew and passengers being opened, fumigates (with vinegar) and resealed before being sent to Queenborough post Office.  All parcels had to be aired on the ships deck before being sent or used.

The prison hulk Cumberland had 80 deaths onboard, this included a surgeon that was treating the victims.  At the same time there were 12 deaths in Sheerness from the disease, another 12 in Faversham and 47 in Minster, Sheppey.

Another Hulk, the Eurgalus, which was moored off Chatham had an outbreak in 1831.  The prison ship housed mostly boys aged 8-15.  Surgeon records from the transport vessel, the Waterloo, recorded picking up 214 convicts, they travelled to Sheerness where it was recorded 40 convicts were suffering from Cholera and 8 had died from the disease.

In 1811 there were 520 convicts living in hulks.  

It was recorded there were 135 deaths in 11 areas of Sheppey by mid 1832.

Several cases were reported in Eastchurch, with two being harvest labourers.  The graves were fenced off in accordance with Government instructions.  There were so many deaths in Eastchurch that many people were buried in a mass grave in the church's meadow.

Another victim of Cholera, this time from Sheerness, was Vice Admiral Sir Richard King, Commander in Chief, Nore.  He was a member of the Court Marshal that tried the ringleader of the Mutiny at the Nore, Richard Parker, in 1797.  Sir Richard King died at Admiralty House in the Dockyard, his body was interred at The Church of All Saints in Eastchurch.  You can find a memorial plaque on the wall inside.

The General Board of Health recorded that the huge scale of the Cholera epidemic in 1849 was due to overcrowding, poor ventilation, the inadequacy of the water supply and lack of sewers, drains and privies.  There were still no drains in Sheerness in 1860.

To try and reduce the disease spreading any further dead bodies of the victims and prisoners were taken and left on a small area of marsh near Queenborough.  This marshy island got the nickname Dead Man's Island, it is still known by this today.  Victims that had suffered from smallpox, malaria and other easily spread diseases were buried here also.

The last case of Malaria was recorded in 1952 when a man died of the disease.  Due to this there have been many investigation in the area to keep track of the mosquitoes that thrive in the marshy land on the Isle of Sheppey.




 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines