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Author Topic: Witchcraft  (Read 29477 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #38 on: March 02, 2015, 20:56:50 »
Another witch bottle found in Kent, this time at Hoath Cottage, Hoath, near Herne Bay, in 1968. The bottle was found under the fireplace, and was confirmed as a witch bottle by its contents.
More @ http://cka.moon-demon.co.uk/KAR015/KAR015_Hoath.htm

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #37 on: November 02, 2014, 22:38:31 »
A link to a list of accusations of witchcraft, possession, etc within Kent, October 1568 to March 1682.
http://witching.org/brimstone/detail.php?mode=oldcounty&county=Kent

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2012, 21:46:37 »
You mean Drake's Crab and Oyster Bar - I think these were executed for being protestants under the reign of Mary I and not for being witches.


William and Katherine Allin of Frittenden and five others, burnt 18 June 1557 at Maidstone

From Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marian_persecutions Picture of the plaque - doesn't mention witches.

elmore1978

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #35 on: July 10, 2012, 21:45:06 »
As you go into maidstone town centre, just as you reach the roundabout coming from chatham there is an old 17th century building on the left which has a plaque on it mentioning that in 16-- so many witches were killed on that site for their beliefs.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2012, 22:50:02 »
This rather amused me.
In July 1570, Richard Wickes, vicar of St Dunstan's near Canterbury, made a series of charges against Leon'd Norgrave, the keeper of Canterbury goal.
One complaint accused him of letting out a convicted witch on what we would now call day release.
Norgrave replied that the witch does more good by her physic than the preachers Mr Pundall and Mr Wood do by god's word.

'...dye speake these wordes....the wytche dyd more good by hir phisick than Mr. Pundall, and Mr Wood being pre of godes word.' Kent assizes 35/12.

Norgrave was found not guilty of the charges.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2012, 01:16:27 »
Witches in early modern England.
http://witching.org/content/welcome
Plenty on Kent, but a difficult site to navigate, good luck!
If, like me , you have trouble using search on this site, go to http://witching.org/brimstone/detail.php?mode=city&city=faversham
and replace faversham with maidstone etc.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2012, 00:55:44 »
"Temporal distribution of witchcraft indictments at Kent assizes 1560-1700.
1560-79         16 indictments
1580-99         23
1600-19         13
1620-39          8
1640-59         45
1660-79         15
1680-99         10

Sex of accused witches and their victims at Kent assizes 1560-1700.
Sex        witches                  victims
Male         7                          45
Female     73                         54

It is clear that disputes between neighbours were at the root of witchcraft accusations......
........The foregoing analysis
(Not shown here) indicates that witchcraft accusations were the outcome of disputes between neighbours in which the woman to be accused of witchcraft felt injured, and, as a consequence, bore malice towards her antagonist. The antagonist, who was to become the victim of witchcraft, felt that because of the dispute he had left himself open to some kind of retribution. Some time later he would suffer a misfortune, deduce that he was a victim of the vengeance of the women with whom he had had a dispute, and suspect and eventually accuse her of witchcraft."
From;
Social and Economic Characteristics of Witchcraft Accusations in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth- Century Kent.
Adrian Pollock,  Archaeologia Cantiant vol 95, 1979.

ellenkate

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2012, 21:50:30 »

Offline Paul

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2012, 16:46:31 »
There`s a TV programme about "Mudlarking" on the History Channel that deals with these bottles :)
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Lutonman

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #29 on: January 08, 2012, 12:35:07 »
Odd that the finds should be in a Bellarmine bottle. Cardinal Bellarmine was a well-known German (I think) cleric renowned for his alcoholic excesses and was lampooned by having his face put on a range of jugs and bottles. Didn't know they found their way over here so early on.

Alastair
My understanding is the bottles are "man with a beard", it is thought that the Cardinal working from Rome may well have upset some of the Germans so much that they renamed the jugs after him as a means to deride him. I found no evidence that he had alcohlic exzcessess.

Offline Alastair

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2012, 15:05:50 »
Odd that the finds should be in a Bellarmine bottle. Cardinal Bellarmine was a well-known German (I think) cleric renowned for his alcoholic excesses and was lampooned by having his face put on a range of jugs and bottles. Didn't know they found their way over here so early on.

Alastair

seafordpete

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2012, 09:57:07 »
2 of my wife's ancestors were tried in the Salem Witch trials, sentenced to death but the the same day the State Governor declared the trials to be illegal and they were released. I'm sure they were guilty and the craft came down through the family at least to the mother in law if not the wife  :)

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2012, 21:08:51 »
http://ia700408.us.archive.org/34/items/discoverieofwitc00scot/discoverieofwitc00scot.pdf

Victorian edition of the 1534 book published by Reginald Scott of Brabourne "Discoverie Of Witchcraft"

Brief history of the book and his research on Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discoverie_of_Witchcraft

Fred the Needle

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2011, 09:13:21 »

I am starting a new thread on the Historical and present uses of Plants.

Ellenkate

Good idea.  I've always had an opinion that certain herbs etc that we use in cooking (fresh and organic please) make a difference to overall health but I'm lost when it comes to using them to cure or alleviate ailments.

Regarding alysloper's witches garden, I'm sorting out our garden at the moment and we're planning a herb area.  Hmmmmmmmmmmmm.

On the subject of the pharmaceutical companies, at least they give some kind of structure.  However, set against that is their need to make a profit.  The "Wise Women" (I think) didn't concern themselves with that - apart from needing to live as I don't think they were the richest in the village.

ellenkate

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2011, 17:53:52 »

I am starting a new thread on the Historical and present uses of Plants.

Ellenkate

 

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