News: Gypsy tart originated from the Isle of Sheppey
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Witchcraft  (Read 29541 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sheppey_bottles

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 936
  • Appreciation 46
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2011, 17:26:33 »
Forgot to say that this edition is edited by DAVID POTERTON.

Offline sheppey_bottles

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 936
  • Appreciation 46
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2011, 15:52:27 »
For anyone who is interested in Herbal medicine a good book worth seeking out is called Culpepper's 'Colour' Herbal. This book not only explains how Nicholas Culpepper used his herbs as a medicine but also explains modern day uses or indeed non usage!!! as many are extremely dangerous. Compulsive reading if you are in any way interested in the plants around you.

ISBN No.. 0-572-01152-0   W. Foulsham & Co ltd 1983

Offline alysloper

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 143
  • Appreciation 7
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2011, 14:57:49 »
Thanks to Herb Collector and ellenkate

As a soon-to-be ex-employee of a local pharmaceutical company, I am also interested in herbal remedies and their history.
Let's not forget that the completely synthetic pharmaceutical industry as we know it is barely over 100 years old and many medicines are still derived from natural sources. What has changed is the quality control situation and legal framework for making and selling medicines.

Also, before the NHS, many rural people relied on the local "wise woman" as they could afford or maybe didn't trust the local doctor.

thanks again for the thread - i would love to have a bash at growing a Witches garden!

Ian

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Appreciation 238
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2011, 22:02:49 »
Thank you ellenkate,
I have been a member of KHF for almost 2 1/2 years and, despite my forum name, it is the first time I have posted anything about herbs  :)

ellenkate

  • Guest
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #19 on: September 21, 2011, 20:28:05 »
Very interesting Herb Collector - thank you for this information.

I am very interested in the uses of herbs and keep a file of information.
      My Kentish gt-grandmother was brought up by her grandparents at Ide Hill near Sevenoaks, and her grandparents used to make ointments and herbal lotions etc.  My grandmother used to tell me her mother told her that they made buttercup ointment (maybe for leg ulcers - smallpox etc?).  When she got old my gt-grandmother used to wrap cabbage leaves around her own ulcerated legs (I heard of this remedy somewhere else too).  My gt-grandmother also told her that when young she used to deliver ointments onto doorsteps where there was smallpox in the house in Ide Hill.  
      My gt-grandmother's name was Jane GEER, born 1841.  
Her grandfather owned some land at Ide Hill/Sundridge called 'Hanging Bank' which is interesting !

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Appreciation 238
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2011, 20:34:51 »


FOXGLOVE (Digitalis) has strong associations with folklore and fairies.
The earliest name in the 14 Century was Foxes glofa. A Shropshire witch is supposed to have “discovered” digitalis which, in modern times, is synthetically produced, for use as a heart stimulant.
The plant is dangerous to use.


A few more plants supposedly connected to witchcraft.

Deadly nightshade    Atropa Belladonna   Toxic.
Berrys known as satans cherries.
Of major importance in modern medicine.
When rubbed into skin or inhaled can cause intoxicating sensations of flying.

Henbane     Hyoscyamus Niger   toxic.
Can cause death from heart or respiratory failure.
Can cause hallucinations and sensation of flight.
Its use is mentioned in records of witch trials.

Hemlock    Conium Maculatum   extremely toxic if eaten.
Supposedly connected to European witchcraft.

Mandrake      Mandragora Officinarum       toxic.
The roots often resemble human figures.
Has long been used in magic rituals due to its narcotic and hallucinogenic properties.

Mistletoe     Viscum Album   toxic if eaten.
In German folklaw allows users to see and talk to ghosts.

Monkshood/Wolfsbane     Aconitum Napellus.
Contains Aconitine, one of the most toxic plant compounds known.
In folklaw is said to turn a person into a werewolf if eaten or smelt.

Mugwork      Artemisia Vulgaris
Mother of all herbs and used in witchcraft.

Opium poppy        Papaver Somniferum   toxic if eaten except for seeds.
Supposedly used by witches to produce a flying ointment when mixed with other plants.

The above are all native to Britain and it is quite legal to grow them. Would make an interesting 'witches garden'.

There is evidence that the first plants to be domesticated were not the staple foodstuffs, but psychoactive species such as Mandrake, Henbane, Belladonna and, in the Americas, tobacco. 
Lost Civilisations of the Stone Age Richard Rudgley, page 140.

The Poison Garden

Offline sandi_01

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
  • Appreciation 19
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2011, 18:47:03 »
What gives the Church the right to give these and other old skeletons (often pre Christian) a so called Christian burial? Imagine the  row if the local mosque/synagog or whatever tried to do the same.

seafordpete...I totally agree with you. I have only just seen this thread. I am not a Christian and would be horrified to think that well meaning 'Christians' had taken charge of my remains after my death. Not that it's likely to happen...just saying! You have given me something to think about there...thank-you!

Sandi

Offline unfairytale

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1311
  • Appreciation 31
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2011, 16:58:56 »
The act that was repealed in 1951 was the Fraudulent Mediums Act.

   In the 1700s, when the law realised that witches didn't exist, the earlier laws which made witchcraft illegal were almost reversed and it became illegal to 'pretend' to be a witch or to say that someone else was a witch. After 1951 it became ilegal to pretend to be a witch for monetary gain, otherwise it was ok.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline ann

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 423
  • Appreciation 44
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2011, 13:09:15 »
Going back to the witchbottle Ellenkate mentioned.  As i recall they had one in the museum in Gravesend. This was probably sometime in the 1980's when it was located in the market entrance in the High Street.  Not sure where they moved it to.

Offline Sentinel S4

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1946
  • Appreciation 154
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2011, 04:39:57 »
Thanks Fred The Needle, you have cleared up the point I was trying to make. I tried to make it as clear as I could, failed as normal. Sadly here is not the place for a debate on the Wicca/Pagan theologies V's Christianity, oh how I love that one on the doorstep with the groups that come around. S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Merry

  • Guest
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2011, 22:47:33 »
Modern Wicca only really emerged in the 30s with the work of Gerald Gardner and Margaret Murray.  They claimed that the practices they described could be traced back to a pre-Christian cult but that's up for debate.
However both Wicca and other Pagan paths are thriving!

If I recall , The Gillingham Chronicles mention that a woman called Agnes May was accused of witchcraft but that no record of her fate is known. 

Offline Lyn L

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1161
  • Appreciation 77
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2011, 13:41:56 »
In the same year those 3 witches that Ellenkate has posted, 1645, there were also 6 women hanged in Maidstone and 1 in Sandwich , no names given . And in 1593 a Nicholas Hardwyn was accused and went to trial in Kingsdown , but the last part of the trial papers went missing  so it's unknown whether he was condemned or not.

This was from the Lynsted and Kingsdown Society.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Fred the Needle

  • Guest
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2011, 10:26:24 »
The problem with the Wise Women who were considered witches was (as Sentinel S4 says) they had a better hit rate for curing than the "established" professions. So they were at threat.

Not sure about the Wicca "link".  My understanding was that the Wise Women who were considered witches were a stand alone group, often going to the christian churches as like as not.

But does kyn's original post mean that up until 1951 you could still be burnt at the stake?

ellenkate

  • Guest
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2011, 23:29:17 »

Apart from the 'Nell Garlinge" of Coldred, whom I mentioned earlier, the only other name of a witch I can think of is  Alice Nutter  a member of the Pendle Witches, in Lancashire

see:  http://www.pendlewitches.co.uk/


Offline Sentinel S4

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1946
  • Appreciation 154
Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2011, 22:53:08 »
The Wiccan belief is still as strong as ever, however that is not about Witches. Very often these were the Women who had survived and prospered as well as had had several children and knew about several herbs for healing. They were often better than doctors and 'trained' mid-wives. In more remote places they were the only chance you had of surviving ANY illness. They were hunted by so called men who thought they knew better, doctors and churchmen, and did away with many innocent old ladies who talked to them selves (chances are they had senile dementia etc). The 'men' who hunted these old ladies thought that they were better than some old girl who could provide relief for a headache or tooth ache. The problem was that the old ways had a better hit rate than the new medicine, you went to a doctor if desperate and then only if you were ready to meet you maker, surviving a visit to a doctor was a novel idea during the time of the witch hunts. The church had a downer as according to them women were inferior and seen as chattels, there is a modern comparison but I will not mention this religion as I don't want to upset anyone or the moderators, or property to be used, abused and traded. Thank the Gods that times have changed, in most countries that is. Did we ever have any well know Witches in Kent? S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines