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Author Topic: Witchcraft  (Read 29556 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2011, 22:06:51 »
The Greenwich Witch bottle.
http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/halloween/opening_witch_bottle/index.html
Its also worth clicking on the uncanny archaeology link on the bottom, the Cornwall link is very interesting,

ellenkate

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2011, 21:56:18 »


FOXGLOVE (Digitalis) has strong associations with folklore and fairies.
The earliest name in the 14 Century was Foxes glofa. A Shropshire witch is supposed to have “discovered” digitalis which, in modern times, is synthetically produced, for use as a heart stimulant.
The plant is dangerous to use.

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WITCH-BOTTLES:

from wikipedia:
 The witch bottle  is  a very old spell device. 
Its purpose is to draw in and trap evil and negative energy directed at its owner. Folk magic contends that the witch bottle protects against evil spirits and magical attack, and counteracts spells cast by witches.

A traditional witch bottle is a small flask, about 3 inches high, created from blue or green glass. Larger and rounder witch bottles, up to 9 inches high, were known as Greybeards and employed so-called Bartmann or Bellarmine jugs. Bellarmines were named after a particularly fearsome Catholic Inquisitor, Robert Bellarmine, who persecuted Protestants, was instrumental in the burning of Giordano Bruno and, in consequence, was labeled as a demon by his victims. Greybeards and Bellarmines were not made of glass, but of brown or gray stoneware that was glazed with salt and embossed with severe bearded faces designed to scare off evil.

A witch, cunning man or woman, would prepare the witch's bottle. Historically, the witch's bottle contained the victim's (the person who believed they had a spell put on them, for example) urine, hair or nail clippings, or red thread from sprite traps. In recent years, the witch's bottle has taken on a nicer tone, filled with rosemary, needles and pins, and red wine. Historically and currently, the bottle is then buried at the farthest corner of the property, beneath the house hearth, or placed in an inconspicuous spot in the house. It is believed that after being buried, the bottle captures evil which is impaled on the pins and needles, drowned by the wine, and sent away by the rosemary.

Sometimes seawater or earth are used instead. Other types of Witch-bottles may contain sand, stones, knotted threads, feathers, shells, herbs, flowers, salt, vinegar, oil, coins, or ashes. A similar magical deceive is the "lemon and pins" charm.

Another variation is within the disposal of the bottle. Some witch's bottles were thrown into a fire and when they exploded, the spell was broken or the witch supposedly killed.

This form of "bottled spell" dates back hundreds of years, and were prevalent in Elizabethan England - especially Anglia, where superstitions and belief in witches were strong. The bottles were most often found buried under the fireplace, under the floor, and plastered inside walls.

The Witch-bottle was believed to be active as long as the bottle remained hidden and unbroken. People did go through a lot of trouble in hiding their Witch-bottles - those buried underneath fireplaces have been found only after the rest of the building has been torn down or otherwise disappeared. The origins of this tradition have been dated at least to the 16th century. In ancient times the bottles were made of stone and originally contained rusty nails, urine, thorns, hair, menstrual blood, and pieces of glass, wood, and bone. Etc


kevin payne

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2011, 18:54:49 »
the church,"christian faith",believes in love,forgiveness,and salvation!,they only mean well,nothing else!






ellenkate

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2010, 10:28:56 »
Witches?

MURRELL, Mary,   'Shorne witch 1894'  case dismissed
(Crime and Criminals in Victorian Kent (Gray 1985) p. 96)

EXECUTED as witches at Faversham 1645:  Joan CARRIDE  Jane WILLFORD   Jane HOLT

I think there was a Nell Garlinge ducked and drowned in Coldred pond?  believed to be a witch but cannot find reference.


seafordpete

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2009, 14:57:50 »
What gives the Church the right to give these and other old skeletons (often pre Christian) a so called Christian burial? Imagine the  row if the local mosque/synagog or whatever tried to do the same.

merc

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2009, 14:03:21 »

Offline kyn

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Re: Witchcraft
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2009, 15:21:30 »
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Offline kyn

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Witchcraft
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2008, 00:00:01 »
The witchcraft act was only repealed in 1951!

 

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