News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
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Author Topic: Free School Lane Rochester  (Read 5466 times)

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Offline peterchall

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Free School Lane Rochester
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2010, 15:53:26 »
I went to Rochester Junior Technical School, 1941 to 1944, but we used the Math school premises for some lessons. My recollection is that the buildings themselves did not go right back to Corporation Street, but what is now part of the car park was the school 'playground'. I have a vague memory of going into the playground via a short tunnel.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline MedwayDweller

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Free School Lane Rochester
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2010, 07:34:19 »
Is that giftshop Frances Isles? They had/have 2 or 3 gift shops and art shops in the High Street, even a gallery at one point.
nostalgia's not what it used to be

Offline peterchall

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Free School Lane Rochester
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2010, 09:36:53 »
.......The 1907 map shows a road called 'The Commom' going from the bridge as far as 'Free School Lane'.
So why was it Free School Lane? The following is an edited extract from 'A History of Rochester' by FF Smith.

Sir Joseph Williamson was MP for Rochester from 1689 to 1701, when he died. In his will he left £5000 for:
"The building carrying on and perpetual maintenance of a free school at Rochester and of a school-master for the instructing and educating of the sons of the freemen of the City towards the mathematics and other things that might fit them for the sea service or arts and callings leading or relating thereto". (Phew - all one sentence without a single comma. But that's how it was written!).

Sir Joseph Williamson?s Mathematical School was opened in 1708 in Free School Lane and, until 1783, was restricted to the sons of freemen of Rochester. In 1773, owing to the small number of pupils (27), sons of burgesses were admitted at a fee of £4/year (It seems a contradiction in dates, but that's what the book says! Perhaps it was a mis-print). In 1880 the school was opened to all boys living near, with 78 pupils, and a number of free scholarships were awarded.

The school is now on Rochester-Maidstone Road, near Valley View Road.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

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