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Author Topic: Taste of Kent  (Read 11346 times)

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Offline Skulduggery Pleasant

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2016, 10:33:17 »
As I took early retirement a couple of years ago (I know, I know, I don't look nearly old enough  :)) I've started cooking quite a lot.

I came across the following books on the "Abe Books" website. Does anyone have any opinions on them? (I've not been able to find anything on this site about them) :-

Kent Country Recipes - Ann Gomar (1996)

Village Cooking; Recipes from the (Kent) Weald - Joanna Smith (1974)

Flavours of Kent - No Author (2011)

Country Recipe Books: Kent (Country recipes series) - Ann Gomar (1987) Might be an earlier version of the 1996 version

Old Kent Recipes - Catherine Blackwell (1989)

A Kentish Cookery Collection - Alison Revell (1978)

Kentish Fare Millennium Recipes - Mo Joslin (assume 2000)

Favourite Kentish Recipes - Pat Smith (1996)

Flavours of the Region. RECIPES FROM KENT and SAVEURS DE LA REGION . RECETTES DU NORD-PAS DE CALAIS - Patrick Villechaize (2007)



I don't guarantee that's all, the search returned nearly 700 books with "Kent" and "Recipes". I've accumulated (*ahem*) quite a lot of Recipe Books so I'm a little concerned about buying more  :)
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King Chav

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2013, 23:02:54 »
Gypsy Tart!? Oh, yes... I remember having that at school! I used to get free school dinners...

Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #17 on: October 20, 2013, 19:59:20 »
It`s such a tasty old Kentish dish. I still make it and so do the rest of my family. I had half a whole one last week, I had to share the other half  :)
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Offline busyglen

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2013, 18:03:04 »
I also didn't realise Gypsey Tart originated in Kent.  I loved it when I first had it at school, as I stayed for school dinners.  My mother tried to make it, but she wasn't able to get the smoothness that the school kitchen did.
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Offline ann

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2013, 12:15:40 »
Bit surprised no mention has been made of Gypsy Tart whose origins are definitely Kentish.

Did not know this was of Kentish origins.  My absolute favourite - but lethal for the waist!!!

EKCTAFC

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2013, 10:45:06 »
Can anyone add any traditional kentish recipies to the following.
Kent Lent Pie sometimes called Kentish Pudding Pie.

http://www.lynsted.com/html/kent_lenten_pudding_pie.html

mother used to cook this recipe and she called it Kentish Pudding Pie. Very nice it was too.

Another local speciality that has disappeared are Tonbridge Biscuits....

http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipebook/index.php?option=com_rapidrecipe&page=viewrecipe&recipe_id=1105&Itemid=28My

Bit surprised no mention has been made of Gypsy Tart whose origins are definitely Kentish.

King Chav

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2013, 01:41:39 »
Hello to you all! I have got to say I miss the strawberries, cobnuts and Biddenden's Special Reserve Cider! I can get Spitfire Ale out here but it costs $8 for a 500ml bottle!

Offline Apollo

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2013, 12:29:19 »
In an interview with Kent Life, published in the April 2013 edition, Edwyn Martin, the new manager of Produced in Kent, said "Most counties have a food product you associate with them for example, Lancashire hotpot and Irish stew but we don't have that in Kent. Somebody must have a recipe that, 50 years from now, wherever it's eaten in the world, it's associated with Kent and what fun would that be as PinK to push the initiative!"
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2013, 23:00:53 »
The Foods of England Project.
'Every traditional dish, every original receipt, every classic cookbook.'
http://www.foodsofengland.co.uk/index.htm
Type Kent into search and you will find a goodly number of Kentish recipes.
Hodge Podge, Epplag Sausages, Heron! Pudding, Canterbury Pudding, Bread and Cheese Custard,
Appledore Chicken, Folkestone Pudding, Cobnut Cake, Kentish Plover and many more.

A few random tit bits.

The Ploughman's Lunch.
Francis Grose's 'Provincial Glossary' of 1787 says that in Kent, 'The plowmen.......eat a bit of bread and cheese and drink some beer when they come out of the field at ten in the morning and six in the evening.'

Pimm's, a gin-based drink containing quinine and a mixture of herbs, was invented in 1823 by James Pimm, a farmer's son from Newham, Kent.

The first 'hygienic' (grown in running water) Watercress farm was at Springhead, near Gravesend in 1808.
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2013, 22:39:26 »
Tonbridge recipes.

Tonbridge Ginger Beer.
Tonbridge Cakes.
Tonbridge Brawn.
Bordyke Bread.
http://www.tonbridgehistory.org.uk/miscellany/recipes.htm
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2013, 00:09:08 »
Recipes for Kentish Huffkins, Kent Lent Tart, (or pie) and Kentish Pigeons in a pot with Plums,
@ http://greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/the-gbk-cookbook/regional-cooking/kindly-kent/
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2013, 23:02:14 »
Kettlebender, I was assured by several correspondents who made and ate it, was quite appetising and a stomach filler. It was prepared by cutting a thick slice from a loaf of bread, sometimes toasting it if a fire were available, then breaking the bread into pieces in a pudding basin. Salt and pepper were then sprinkled on the pieces and also, if available, a lump of dripping was added. Hot water was poured into the basin and the contents given a stir, then eaten with a spoon while hot.
Another delicacy was Shackells or shackles. For this a large onion was cut into slices and boiled. Then the onion and the water in which it was boiled were poured into a basin already containing pieces of bread and cheese. On all this salt and pepper were liberally sprinkled. It was often eaten hot as a helpful relief during flu, a cold or 'd bronkittis'.
A third delicacy was also called shackells, but comprised a bowl of soup made with a mixture of the liquid from boiled meat bones and various vegtables, plus a sprinkling of salt and pepper.


From 'Kentish As She Wus Spoke. A Guide to the Kentish Dialect.' by Alan Major.
S B Publications 2001. ISBN 1 85770 244 1
A neat little book not only on the Kentish dialect, but also nicknames, sayings and saws, weather sayings, squibs and ditties and other interesting odds and ends.

The author also notes that Hot Flead Cakes, Kentish Pudding-pie, Tunbridge Cake, Kentish Cheese Pasties, Kentish Well Pudding, Rabbit Pudding, and Huffkins, are widely known county delicacies.
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2012, 16:25:51 »
Sound much like Welsh Cakes
Yes, I agree, seaford! My Mum was Welsh and made smashing welshcakes. I once ate some which were bought from a supermarket but they just weren`t the same. Mum had a large oblong hotplate on her old cooker and used it for welshcakes but had to resort to a frying pan when the cooker finally gave up.

seafordpete

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2012, 10:58:46 »
Sound much like Welsh Cakes

heritage07

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Re: Taste of Kent
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2012, 09:33:09 »
I bumped into this one a while ago. Though honestly I haven't tried it yet.

Named after the distinctive hop-drying houses that dot the Kent countryside, these cakes were originally eaten after the crop had been gathered.
They are like thin, fried scones, and are good served lightly dredged with sugar or with cherry jam.


MAKES 12

8 oz plain flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
2 oz lard, diced
1 1/2 oz caster sugar
3 oz currants
3 tbsp vegetable oil
1 oz butter

1.   Put the flour, salt and baking powder into a bowl, then rub in the lard until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.

2.   Stir in the sugar and currants, then mix with 45 - 60 ml (3 - 4 tbsp) water to make a soft dough.

3. Turn out on to a lightly floured surface and roll out until 1 cm (1/2 inch) thick. Using a 5 cm (2 inch) plain cutter, cut out 12 rounds.

4.   Heat the oil and the butter in a heavy-based frying pan and fry the cakes for 2 - 3 minutes on each side, until golden brown. Drain on kitchen paper.

Eaten warm or very fresh.


 

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