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Author Topic: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham  (Read 63554 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2014, 18:50:03 »
Chatham Naval Establishment

Plan showing cell accommodation.

Called for by D.W. Minute No. 2286 of 24th July 1883.

Cells at Marine Barracks.

Offline cliveh

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #60 on: June 21, 2012, 09:48:52 »
A plan of the Barracks from 1911:




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Offline kyn

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #59 on: May 16, 2012, 21:17:05 »
9th March 1954

Mr. A.G. Bottomley (Chatham & Rochester)

As the First Lord knows, the Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham, are unoccupied for the first time in 200 years. Had these buildings been used, there would have been no waste, but they have been neglected and are rapidly deteriorating. That famous parade ground has weeds on it for the first time. I know that it has now been given to the Army, but surely the First Lord should have considered more fully the proposition that I made to him earlier, when the Chamber of Trade wanted to inspect the site in order that it could be considered for industrial purposes. We did not have a very good reply from the First Lord, who was not at all sympathetic. All I can say is that the ratepayers of the town are losing about £3,000 a year. I should like to know what will now be the cost of putting these barracks into a reasonable condition. I imagine that it would be very high. Not only are the citizens of the borough suffering locally, therefore, through higher rates, but they have to pay more taxes nationally because of this kind of neglect.

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #58 on: February 27, 2012, 11:31:11 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 19 August 1856

CHATHAM.
INTERESTING CEREMONY. — An interesting ceremony was witnessed at the Marine Barracks on Wednesday, that of presentation of the cross of the Legion of Honour, which had been awarded by the Emperor of the French to Major G. B. Rodney and Captain D. Blyth, of the Chatham division, for distinguished conduct during the late war. Major Rodney and Captain Blyth are the only officers of Chatham division of Royal Marines who have been decorated with this honor.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #57 on: February 20, 2012, 23:25:10 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 26 February 1861

CHATHAM.
The distribution of the prizes awarded to the non-commissioned officers and men of the Chatham Division of Royal Marines Light Infantry for excellence in rifle firing, on the completion of their annual course of musketry instruction, took place on Tuesday on the parade-ground of the barracks, at a full parade of the officers and men of the battalion. The number of prizes taken by the non-commissioned officers and men of the Chatham division is 68, but only portion of that number were decorated on Tuesday, the remainder being absent from headquarters, either serving afloat or on duty. The presentation of the prizes was made by Lieut.-Col. R. J. McKillop, six men being awarded a gold badge with crossed muskets, to be worn for one year, the wearer being granted 2d. per day additional pay during that period; and 22 men receiving a less expensive kind of badge, which carries with it 1d. per day extra pay. The remaining 40 men will be decorated on their return to head quarters, a few them who proved themselves to be first-class shots receiving an addition of 3d. per day to their pay.
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Offline 101sean

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #56 on: December 02, 2011, 23:51:27 »
Only just signed up here but been wondering about this for years -

Quote
The tunnel Ubique's sister mentions was the RM Deep Refuge. There were two entrances just inside the Dock Road wall of the barracks, an exit into Melville Barracks and an exit into the Gun Drill Battery. It was (still is) on two levels. The lower level was all accommodation with triple level bunks. The upper level was admin offices, plant rooms and a casualty clearing station. The main air intake for the tunnels was via a huge galvanised metal chimney next to the Gun Drill Battery entrance

When I had a crew checking drains on Dock Road around 1998ish we lifted a manhole cover close to the garage and it was over a steel flight of stairs down in to this. I didn't go in but one of the crew did, said it was an immense space and full of bunk beds. Last time I looked a couple of years ago the cover was gone, presumably sealed off when the garage was rebuilt.

Offline kyn

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #55 on: May 29, 2011, 15:10:14 »

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #54 on: February 09, 2011, 23:42:53 »
Oh dear Oh dear I seem to have openned a can of worms with this one.On one hand I have the R.M.'s museum laughing at the claim and on the other hand I have people who have actually seen the feat.In addition to this I have copied below are some postings made on the Military Forum back in 2003 with more tales about the truly heroic feats of D.M.'s at Eastney Barracks.
Has anyone got a picture?   
Can I suggest that if this quest is to be pursued we move it to a new thread and clear the way for leofwines research

Please note the weight of a military ceremonial mace and remember that it had to be tossed to approx 25ft. and would be travelling at a devilish rate of knots when being retrieved

Posting from Military Forum cica 2003

Sticky

I seem to remember an old Corps tale of a Drum Major who, when marching through the main gate at Eastney, would throw his mace (?) over the arch, and catch it on the other side! 

True or false?

TRUE!
The Drum Majors, that I know who could do it, from memory were all DLs and these were the only ones who did it for real on an official parade! Others had done it on their own but never on parade in front of a band.
Colin and Charles Bowden (Brothers)
Jack Daycome

The practice of 'throwing' the staff was stopped in the early 60's by decree of CGRM because too many staffs were being broken. The staff is a solid silver and Mallace Bamboo cane and weighs about 6-8 pounds. When I was in Deal I had one of the heaviest because I was the sprog... not much fun on a long parade I can assure you!
Jack Daycome said, words to the effect of, "I used to practice the arch in the early hours of the morning with a staff I had made for the purpose then one day I did it on parade with the real staff. I lobbed it up and took very big steps as I went under the arch to make sure I was waiting the other side. I looked up and caught it, more by luck than skill. Needless to say, I never had to buy a pint in the mess for weeks!"

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #53 on: February 08, 2011, 17:50:51 »
Wardy is correct. My dad came to Chatham in 1946 and saw the feat performed and told me about it when I was old enough.

Offline Wardy

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #52 on: February 08, 2011, 14:13:38 »
Sorry to be the bearer of bad news Ubique but I've actually seen the Drum Major perform this feat and even at a very young age I was still amazed, sorry again but perhaps the guy you spoke to had it hit him on the head when he tried it

ubique

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #51 on: February 07, 2011, 22:58:52 »
 Drum major tossing his mace.Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but according to an ex-drum major at the RM museum tossing the the mace over the entrance to chatham barracks is a myth.A story told in every town that has a military band
The RM's still produce the best military bands in the world.
(But to march with massed pipes and drums puts a swagger in your step)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #49 on: January 31, 2011, 18:13:12 »
Hill House would have been gone for almost a century by 1876, and was on the other side of the road. I am guessing that might have been the army pay office associated with Chatham (Kitchener) Barracks, and it looks to be about where the statue is now. 

I picked up a map from 1719 today that shows Hill house plus Hill House Garden and Field and there is a note on it saying 'repaired and added to in 1703'.  I'll be scanning it soon and will add it here when I do.
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Offline kyn

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #48 on: January 31, 2011, 14:46:15 »
Is this Hill House marked as the Pay Office?

1876

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #47 on: January 27, 2011, 23:55:56 »
Thanks for that info Charles, very interesting. I'll have to see if I can find any of the British Library images.

I know the dockyard moved from Gun Wharf to it's current location in 1622, but Pepys was staying there in the 1660s. Any idea whether it served as the pay office and accommodation at the same time? Or when it became the pay office?

Also, you mention that it became a pub 'when no longer required by the Navy' do you happen to have a date (even an approximate one) for this?

Re Pay House Lane, are you sure it would be seperate to Red Cat Lane? I've seen various examples of situations where a street was known by more than one name at the same time, I suppose because there were no street name signs (eg Barrack Hill/Brompton Hill/Melville Hill, or sometimes simpler, such as directory entries that list the same location as Road or Row in different addresses).
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