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Author Topic: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907  (Read 131 times)

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Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #7 on: Today at 14:12:48 »
Thanks Mickleburgh, very nice detective work.   It's nice to tie these loose ends up.
DTT

Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #6 on: Today at 12:48:55 »
By 1911 Arthur William Minter (b-1874) and his aged mother (Jane) were at 5, Stanley Terrace, Island Road, Sturry which supports it being Broadoak. He was seemingly born at Ash.
Harry Padgham however was by this time at Buddles Farm, St Peters, Thanet, whether relevant or not unclear.

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #5 on: Today at 08:44:39 »
I think you may be right, filmer01.  Goose Farm, Sturry is in a area known as Broad Oak.  Perhaps it was an error in reporting and spelling that lead to the error.

Thanks
DTT

Offline filmer01

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Re: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 17:19:43 »
There is a Goose Farm at Broadoak, Sturry - could that be it?
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 16:52:50 »
Does anyone know where Broadleek may have been? 

I know Ramsgate/Minster reasonably well and cannot place it.  I have looked on the Kent Interactive Map and cannot find a similar place name.  I am guessing that it was located somewhere along the Minster, Richborough and Sandwich line.  My only guess is it could have been Sevenscore estate, but purely a guess.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 11:41:25 »
Still like it today .Law for the rich not the poor.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Thanet Farm Seige. October 1907
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2017, 22:57:13 »
Tenant "Smoked Out."

An action for alleged assault and trespass commenced in the King's Bench Division on June 3 revealed some very extraordinary procedure in regard to getting rid of a tenant.
Plaintiff, Mr Arthur William Minter, a farmer, took Goose Farm, at Broadleek, in the Isle of Thanet - "the place where the aboriginal Britons met Julius Caesar." He had a three years' lease, and now sued the following defendants for assault and trespass:--
Frederick William Aylwin, of Brynmoor, Liansaulleit, Glanmorganshire;
Thomas Vacher, land agent;
Harry Padgham, a farmer, who was to succeed plaintiff; and
Henry Briggs, a bailiff.

The events complained of, Mr Shearman said, began in the second week of October, 1907, when Briggs, the bailiff, arrived to distrain for L100, the valuation on the farm, which had not been paid. Plaintiff and his aged mother resisted Briggs's entrance, and a siege was set up, which attracted the whole neighborhood. The windows were boarded up from the outside, and the doors were guarded, so that no food went in.

When they could not get the man out in this way they stopped up the chimneys, and the house filled with smoke. But, as these drastic tactics did not succeed, a door was torn down by Briggs, who attempted to get into the house. There was a struggle, in which the plaintiff's aged mother and the plaintiff took a hand, and plaintiff's little finger was broken.
By strategy, said counsel, Briggs was got out of the house, and the siege recommenced. The final stage was a short one. Briggs and the other defendants got to the drains of the house, and pumped in a vile chemical used for testing drains, which got all over the house and drove plaintiff and his mother out.

Mr Minter, a florid gentleman farmer, produced photographs of the fortifications for the jury's inspection. Mrs Jane Minter, plaintiff's aged mother, said Briggs first got into the house through the window, and pushed her down into the room. "When I recovered," said the old lady, I found him looking into my face. He said, 'Madam, you are trespassing!' "I said, 'No, I am not,' and I slapped him in the face."
On Friday Henry Briggs, the defendant, in his version of the affair, said, "When the old lady (plaintiff's mother) opened the window I jumped in. She hit me on the head with a screw-driver, and kicked and scratched and behaved like Boadicea leading the ancient Britons."
Counsel (cross-examining): Why did you barricade the house?
Witness: To starve Minter out.
His Lordship: He was entitled to.
Counsel: I am more than surprised to hear your lordship say so. I hope you won't direct the jury that way.
His Lordship: I do say so. If he was legally entitled to get the man out he was entitled to use these means.
The jury found there was no assault, and judgment was therefore given for the defendants.


From Lloyd's Weekly News. October 1909.

 

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