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Author Topic: What is this?  (Read 14045 times)

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logicman

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2009, 06:56:55 »
When I was a child in the 1950s I lived nearby at Westminster.  I used to walk to school past the railway station.  At that time the dockyard railway spur was still in use, and the goods sidings of Dockyard station, formerly called Sheerness station, were always filled with small, black tankers that smelled wonderfully of tar.  The spur rails to the gate were shiny then, suggesting they were used, although I never saw a train enter or leave the dockyard.  Perhaps they moved the train only at night so as not to block the road, thus depriving small schoolboys of an excuse to linger close to a steam train in an very dangerous area.  (There were never any crossing gates there.)

Considering that the dockyard was a military establishment there was a need to ensure that it was strongly secured against foreign invaders and small schoolboys.  I surmise that the gadget shown is simply a winder for opening the heavy iron gates from the outside.  The gauge part of such a mechanism would show when the gates were fully open, they being invisible to a driver if his loco was beside the gadget.

I imagine that it was unacceptable to have a doorbell and to have road traffic held up for half an hour by a goods train parked across the road whilst the only dockyard matey who ever did any work ambled his way from the other side of the basins.

The cost of having a sentry posted at those gates 24/7 would have outweighed the benefits, although I suppose that many a National Serviceman would have loved such a sinecure.

The road level there, as far as I recall, is well above the top of edge of the Lappel "beach" as it then was, and t
he nearest outfall was by the pier, so I doubt this gadget had anything to do with water.

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2009, 22:39:55 »







splashdown

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2008, 16:12:06 »


At low tide on smaller ships we can still see the remains of the pier under the quayside, or whats left of it.

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2008, 15:27:15 »

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2008, 14:56:53 »
Here is a pic of the model showing the tunnels and another circular tunnel.  Culvert ???


Swamp Kiwi

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2008, 19:34:11 »
The Jolly Sailor was run by a couple called Len and Doris in the late '70s. They were from Thanet and it was their first and only pub, I think. Len found a couple of enormous gas lamp fittings hidden away upstairs, like an inverted 'T' shape they were, had them wired for electricity and hung above the bar. There was a taxi company (Ph: 2222) had their office just along the road opposite the pier house and the owner liked to keep exotic animals in the back yard. Some nights we would here the things roar while we were enjoying a pint. So the story goes (I wasn't there) one night one of the regulars burst in through those little doors on the corner, all breathless and panting, and announced "I've just been chased by a ****ing bear." Everyone laughed and said they wouldn't fall for that but a couple of minutes later the taxi company owner came in and asked "anyone seen a bear come past here?"

Swamp Kiwi

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2008, 03:41:15 »
Does anyone have any photos of the Rennie model of Sheerness Dockyard that was on display a few years ago? That might shed some light on this. I heard the model was brought to the island and set up for the locals to have a look at but I never got to see it. I was sent a copy of the guide from the 'Historic Sheppey Series' and a drawing on page 6 shows a tunnel running from the mast pond under some buildings to the river front at the corner of the entrance to Rats Bay. You can see it better on the photo on pages 12 & 13 and that also shows the 3 arches which you can see in Kyn's photo to the left of the tunnel. Sorry I can't post an image - no scanner.
Digging back into the dark recesses of my memory and walks on the pier, I'm sure that there was a big hole with a grill over it at the sea wall end of Rats Bay, right where this device seems to be. To me it looks like a winding mechanism with an indicator to show the position of the sluice gate.
As an aside to that, I remember the landlord at the Jolly Sailor used to need to wear his wellies when he was changing a barrel in the cellar during a Spring tide.Perhaps that sluice is still open.  

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2008, 23:37:28 »
After checking plans and google i've worked out this is the culvert


And it is right next to where the pier would have come out  :)

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2008, 18:54:06 »
Could well be!  I will ask around when i get a chance!

Offline Paul

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2008, 10:14:49 »
This cover is on the otherside of the Dock wall on the raised section opposite that thing.
Could it be an access point to the culvert ???


Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2008, 12:01:15 »
At this rate i'm going to ring the historian   :)

I checked all my plans for the culvert and none mark it anywhere.  Apparently it loops under West street before leading to the water next to the old pier.  

I wonder if the docks or council will have plans for it as surely it would interfere with and buildings that could be built here?

Offline kyn

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2008, 16:41:46 »
Thinking about this (and chatting to my Dad  ;D) we have decided it's for a sluice gate  :)

Whilst talking to the local historian, David Hughes, he mentioned a culvert in this part of Bluetown.  Once i realised i wouldn't be able to get inside it i lost interest however the culvert would have come out in this area so it is very possible this was the sluice gate for it.

Offline Paul

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2008, 13:22:07 »
Could that thing have been a stopcock for putting water in steam engines ???

Maybe there was a tower thing with a tube.
Wev'e got dockyard steambuffs on here do they know ???
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Trev

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2008, 15:48:13 »
Could have been a timer for the gate?
Wind it and the gate opens, then shuts itself after so long.
Saves getting out the cab twice?

(Uneducated guess) ???

Offline Paul

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2008, 11:14:22 »
It does look like some kind gauge,It looks like at one time it had a scale screwed to it Gas?
A large spanner and a tin of WD40 ;D
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

 

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